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■i"X 



f^ 









HINERVA INSTRUCTING YOUTH ' 



" Hisc youth, exalt thystlf and mf." 



/ 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOO?, 

NO. I. 



THS 



JUVENILE SPELLING-BOOK: 

BEifro 
s AN EASY INTRODUCTION 

TO THB 

EJ^GLISH LAJfGUAGE: 

CONTAINING 

EASY AND PAMiLIM^' LBS§(fi^JH SPELLING, 

WITH APPR<>|5ll4tJj JlE JplNG LESSONS, 



* . * 



' cfifLCtrLlTEI) 

To advance tJie kamer *;/ en^%r^at$ofi^;^^d^ teach the ortlu^graphy 
of Johmon] twiiM; prtntiiataUtorCof Walker 

BY A> PICKET. 

AUTHOR OF THF. AMERICA?? SCHOOL CLASS-BOOfCS, VfZ. 
TnE JUVEXILK EXPOSITOR, JUVENILE MENTOR, &C. i:C. 

* >Vhinj «tii *nt«r into tht tflecHon* which »tnmWM »t the thrvthold. '...^Jaif. 



■■ 



niPnOVED A.VU STKRUOTYPKD. 



STEREOTYPED BV €. AND J. WHITE. NEW-YORK. FOR 

1>ANIEL D. SMITH. 

• (Etcv(n*h Sfertotvp^ KUidon.) * 

For ^p.^e v.- him st the Frinlihn Juvenilf R«ol: an<] Stationary ?*or*», ?.\ 

•IH) Oriifcon ich-slreet, and by tJie princrpiii Book^elli-ra in tlijg City and (J:fc L'.;- 
> ..~ ... 

i«i9. 
^Priae 2 dolU. per doz. 2f conk singie.) 



I 

BOOKS designed to precede ii^d accompany tiiis Spell- 
ing-Book, viz. 



THE JUVENILE, OR UNIVERSAL PRIMER. 
THE PARENT'S MANUAL, OR CHILD'S FRIEND. 
THE JUVENILE MENTOR, OR SELECT READ* 

IN6S. 
THE JUVENILE EXPOSITOR. 
PICKETS' GEOGRMHICiJi QflAMMAR, &c. 

.•:>:- :V •-•• .'::V: 




ItB IT REMEMBERED, That en dw tbird *Jj eF Fcbrmtry, in tW tUrtf-firlitk fMr • 
tha Indcpindenoe »( tba Unitad StttM of America, ALBERT PICKET, of th* nid diatrlBt, 
hu dapoaited ia this office the title of a h«ok, tUa riffht wharaaf ha clainu at Author and Prapric* 
tor, in the words foDowinf^, to .Kit: " American School Clasa-Book, r?o. I. Tb« JUVENILIB 
SFE LLIIVO-BOOK : bcinfr an tMj introduotion to the English ianguaga. Coatainin;^ eaajr and 
familiar lessous in spelling, with appropriate readuif lessons, eaknlated to adrance the leanicr ^ty 
easy g>radatio«i, and to tieacb the orthofSfvaphy of Johason, and <he proonsciatien of Walker. B/ A< 
Picket, author o," tbo ** Juvenile Expositor,** etc " Nothing can tnter into th* affeetaona, whiflh 
stumbles at the thresbold.**...fiIair. The revised and improved impression.*' 

la oonformtty to the Act of tlic Congress of th« United Statei, entitled ** Aa Act for Um c»- 
eoarsgemert of Icantinf^ hj securing the copies of Maya, Charta, and Books, to the apthors and 
prophetors of such eopict, during the time therein it* atiaaed.** And also to an A^ tntitlad ** Mm 
Act, supplementary to «n Act, entitled an Act for ^w enaoorafement of learning, hf aasarinc tha 
copies i)f Maps, Cbarik, and Books, to the aulbon ad propriotert of such ce|fna, during Iko la«M9 
therein mentioned, and extendii^ the basa&s tfaK** )• Uta arts of daaigaiBf . aBgraTiv •ad «lc|ii«S 
hutoriflai and othar onirtr" 

« THEKON RUDD. 
Clark of tha Nt^^oik 



J 



PREFACE. 



An elementary book, designed for general use, ought to contain aa 
much useful matter as its limits will admit, and he unincumbered wit3i 
abstract rules and metaphysical distinctions. It should contain, not 
only the standard orthography and the best usage of pronunciation, 
but also, plain and simple examples ; conducting tlie infantile pupil,, 
step by step, from the letters of the alphabet, through syllables and 
words, to a series of amusing, familiar, and instructive lessons. In 
teaching children tlie first principles of reading, we should take 'na- 
ture for our guide. Every thing should be plain and easy. Whatever 
is adapted to the juvenile mind, it comprehends. 

In the orthographical exercises, tfie lessons have been much simpli- 
fied, and the pronunciation of all the words obviously pointed out, by 
analogical classifications, according to the specific quantity of tlie 
vowel sounds, whether long, short, middle, or broad. This plan is so 
fimple and natural, that it requires but few directions, to enable the 
learner to become ^cqugv^edowiih than^ngt o»\prweot orthography and 
harmonious pronuijoi^tion df thc^Eu§|flisl} Is^^^uA^ej 

AH uncommon ol* eJj&J^te^JWohls have* Jifeeo «orupulously omitted. 
The lumbering up of eloop^taty.bopks WinWords which are seldom 
or never used by chaste jF"t3>riec-tAvrite«^ and making children learn 
them in the first stages oTtlioir odrtca4.ioa,'ii^roductive of very Uttle 
real benefit. R is sacrificiDg4ime>2 it ^pg^ Ijne^n^d without improving 
the learner either in lJ«agira^jpj*-$bi(^e^e. V 

The grand object of« SpeHbi^-bciok,-' iS to teach children to spell 
and read as soon as possible ; and not to perplex them with long cata- 
logues of words which are seldom used. 

It has been the endeavour of the author to adapt the plan of the 
work both in manner and matter to the capacities of youth, and to 
enable instructers to teach the elements of our language with ease to 
themselves aud advantage to tlie learner. The reading lessons have 
lieen selected with great care. Not a word or sentiment has been in- 
tentionally inserted, which is not consonant with jthe purity of religion 
and morality, and calculated effectually to impress upon the tender 
mind, the love of virtue and goodness, and*to form a taste for reading. , 

All extraneous matter has been rejected, and the pages filled with 
that which is deemed necessary and useful : comprising all tliat seems 
to be proper for an elementary school-book. 

In a manual of this kind, to have omitted the principles on which our 
language is constructed, would have been extremely culpable. The 
Etsentiait of English Grammar have, therefore, been inserted. ^~ 



iv PREFACE. 

.thifl part of the work, care has been taken to render it nmple, intriK- 
gible and appropriate. I|i teaching the elements of gTammar, wc 
ought, aa in every other tcience or art, to ibUow nature. By ob* 
serving her operations, inaprovement is facilitated; by acting other- 
wise, it is retarded. When we teach a child to read, we begin with 
the letters, then unite them into syllables ; syllables into words, and 
words into sentences. In the same manner ought we to proceed ia 
teaching' a child the parts of speech, and their uSes in composition. 

The first thing necessary, after the learner can spell and read cor^ 
rectly, is to teach him the <£fferent sorts of'^ords and their uses ; &• 
various kinds of nouns ; the different methods of distinguishing the 
sex ; the numbers and cases of nouns with their variations ; the com- 
parisoil of adjectives ; the different kinds of pronouns ; tiie moods, 
tenses, numbers and persons of verbs; the distinction between tbm 
active, passive, and neuter verbs ; the nature and use of adverbiy 
oonjunctions, prepositions, interjections, and other essential particulars 
interspersed throughout the Grammar. The next step is synthetical 
parsing, or applying rules to such words as govern or influence one 
another, in construction. 

That the rules of syntax maybe rendered practical and uiefu], 
sentences are added to each, and the words-marked with figures that 
refer; to the rules J«}uelv*^^kn^lif)rtbe9^or^i;^i^r whioh they are 
placed. By thes^liejp^ ^d Uie s]^)Xi^^cditi]>e$iod of parsing ex- 
iiibited in the key, immediately precdCUdg thb* rules of syntax, young 
learners will be materiaMy')PL2ledS]f&fiduiti([f$ a facility in parsbg sya- 

tactically. • •**. i\*** • *• 

Every teacher will«d<v}bt|ca| pei^iV^ th£ propriety and utility of 

inserting the £«en/i^4!:''^^^^fH'i>^'*4^ ^ ^^ work, as it 
superettes the necessity .!>( V^^^fitttofiifi Pp^ ^^^ ^^ hainds ol 
the learner, till he b prepared to enter {he jTuvenile Exporter, Mur- 
ray's large Grammar, or any other work which is well adapted to 
that purpose. A superabundance of bodks, dividing the elementary 
requisites into aa many separate books, as there are different grades of 
learners, is extremely inconvenient, perplexing, and expeusive. The 
author being desirous of obviating these objections, has eodeavoured 
to unite the exercises in spelling and reading, and the Essenttals of 
Grammar into one volume, calculated ibr the use of schools through* 
out our extensive country. 

' That this work may not he liable to incidental or typographical er- 
rours, the author has had it cast in stereotype plates, executed at the 
type-fbundery of Messrs. E. k J. White, of New-York. To these 
gentlemen and their ingenious workmen, much credit is due for the 
taste and neatness of the typography, but especially to Mr. Charles 
Starr, for the beautiful stereotype castings disi)layed i& this book. 
Mavhattajt School. J^ac-Yorkf 1817. 



THE JUVENILE 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



A TABLE 



Of the varioui Sounds of the Fawdi* 



as 
as 
as 
as 
as 



,• • 



as heard in Fate, ale, daj* 
in far, bar, arm. 
in fall, call, all. 
in hat, cat, rat. 
ill cedar, liar, 
in cabbape, damagCi 
iiiv"i^6^,'be5/8ee. 
ifji'iAet, ni^V^et. 






;H . .... in her;,,banter. 
War! •---^fn Bilre, vine, line. 



~ ■» J 



a long, 

a middley 

a broai) 

a short,' 

a like u short, 

a like i short, 

e long, 

e short, 

e like u shorty 
, i long, 
ij short, 

1 like e long^ ^ 

o loBff, 

o middle, 

o broad^ 

o short, 

o like u shorty 

a long, 

u short, 

u middle, 

u like o in move, 

7 long, 

J like e long, 

th....The acute or sharp th, as in thfnV, thin 

TH....The grave or flat th, as in thIs, THat. 

9Qr TlMtoNwirtaMiBlltllo. vtilkftt,«M|itt,ivlMii«liAia»#. 



as 

. • . 

» as* 

# • « 

:.ad 
aft 



as 
as 
as 
as 
as 
as 
as 
as 



in «ih',^tin, him. 
: iji^dJiftWent, caprice, 
^ittnby^6y note. 

in move, do, shoe. 

in nor, for, morn. 

in hot, pot, sot. 

in son, love, dove. 

in mute, mule, tube. 

in tub, but, nut. 

in full, bull. 

in rule, cruel 

in fly, try, defy. 

in Urjr, jolly. 



.AMEaiCAN SCUOM. GLASS-BOOK; NO. I. 
The principal dii^ilhiHigs are : 



"T i 



The wand of two Toweli ; as 
. (oi in boil; \ ^^ ioti m our; 
toy in boy; j t ow in c6wj 

Tbtianndof aibgle>h<Ht'Towel| a> 
ea ia heail sounds like e short ; 

ui in build lite i short; 

ue in gueaa like e short ; 

The souiul oT ft uDgle middle vawel ; at 
au in aunt sounds J^emkldlea; 

00 in cool like middle o ; 

00 in good * like middle u;' 

Theaoundof aiiiKleloi^OTbroadTOweli 
■ '- ' '•.»u'»(& .•"-'" •- '■'■ 



ai 111 au- 
aj in day • 
ey in key 
au in daub 



like a long ; 
like a long ; 
like e long ; 
like a brood ; 
like a broad. 



THE ALPHABET, RkkjOt^Kt^'TMOUAR BYCXJTS. ^ 
A a B b , 




Antelope. 



AMEBICAK SCHOOXf CLASS-BOOK, NO. I. 

C c D d 



Dog. 




F f 



E^ogle. 



G S 




H h 



Ha«k. 




K k 



Kangaroo. 




Lynx. 



M 



Moiikey. 




Njl-Ghau. 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLAES-BOOS, KO. I, 

O P p 



Q q 



Quail. 



Pig. 



T I 



■Tortoise. 



10 JUVENILE SPELUNG-BOOK. 

u u : V T 



Xacca-cockatoo. 



T y 



^ 



Yelper. ■ 




Zebra 



AMKRICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. L H 

The Alphabet. 

THE LETTERS PROMISCUOUSLY ARRANGED. 

DBpFGEHAXUYMVRWNKP 

JOZQISLT 

zwxoclyb d fpsmqnvhkrtgsej 

au i 



THE ITALIC LETTERS. 

ABCDEFGHUKLMNOPQRS 

TUVWXYZ 

ahede f ghi j hlmnopqr s tHvv) X y.z 



DOUBLE AND TRIPLE LETTERS. 



fi Iff 

n ff 



ffi 
ffi 



fi 
f 1 



ffl 



and 



M 
AE 

and 



OE 



ae 



OB 

oe 



STOPS U&1i:D IN READING. 



Cdmxna. 



Semi-colon. 



Colon. 



Period 



Intcnbgktion. 



Exclamation. 



B 2 



T2 



JUVENILE SPELLING-BOOK. 



Syllables and wo/rdt of two letUn. 
The vowels long. 

^^ The ■ebdirMoa of th* wftlOiog letsom ioto coIdiium bj icpmtwf IiMt, will fttmaA nuA 
trooU* and eonfadoa, particularlj ia dut-resdiog'. The teacher will doatftlcM peroeiwitigrMtj 
coBTCBNiiM ; a> it renden th* matter mora diaUost aad batter adapted to aohool enroiiai. ' 



Da 


de 


di 


do 


du 


dy 


fa 


fe 


fi 


(6 


fu 


fy 


ga 


pe 


ti 


go 


gu 


V7 


ha 


he 


hi 


ho 


hu 


hy 


ja 
la 


• 

le 


• • 


• • 

lo 


\: 


ly 


ina 


me 


mi 


mo 


mu 


my 


na 


ne 


ni 


no 


nu 


ny 


ra 


re 


ri 


ro 


ru 


U 


sa 


se 


si 


so 


su 


sy 


ta 


te] 


tr 


to 


tu 


ty 


va' 


ve 


vi 


vo 


vu 


vy 


wa 


we 


wi 


wo 


' 




ya 


y« 


y? 


yo 


yu ' 




• 


ce * 


CL 

9 






cy 


- 


ge 


& 






gy 




Tl 


le Towels generally she 


irt. 




Ab 


eb 


• 
IC 


ob 


of 


ub 


ac 


ec 


if 


oc 


od 


uc 


ad 


ef 


ig 


od 


ok 


"g 









" • ' 


% ' -^ 


AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. L 13 


al 


f el 


il 


ol 


ul 


am 


em 


im 


om 


inn 


an 


en 


in 


on 


un 


ap 


ep 


ip 


op 


up 


ar 


er 


ir 


or 


ur 


as 


es 


is 


OS 


uS 


at 


et 


it 


Ot 


ut 


ax 


ex ix 


OX 


ux 




The Towels generally lottg;. ^ 


t 


By 


do* 


be 


be 


go 


cy 


to 


me 


ye 


no 


my 


so 


we 


se 


wo 




' The Towels sliort. ^ 




Am 


if 


at 


of 




an 


in 

1 


it 


on 


us. 


as 


IS 


up 


ox 






The y and ie long, as i in pine. 




Spy 
shy 

z 


cry . 

sky 

why 

sly 

tie 


fry 
my 

by 

Wry 
ire 


sty 
rye 
ile 
fie 


S7 

eye 
vie 
hie 




The vowels short. 




Aft 


aut " [ ell 


• ink 


oft 


alp . 
and 


apt egg 
ask end 


inn 
ill 

■ 


off 
odd 


• WW. tf0, to, 

Jma i»^ «• •>« 


is, as, off %n uMil 


p aot H ijlUblM, bu 


t u wordi, ttMy k(» 


proDouomd, d99. 



4 



JtJVZinLE SFELUNG-BOOK. 

Wordi of tfarw letUn. 
Tht short lound of the vowels tad diphfhoii||« 



Bad 
bag 
bat 



can 
cap 
cat 



had 

ha« 

hat 



fat 

lad 

sad 



mad 
mi^n 
mat 



rag 
wag 

wax 



bed 
beg 
fed 



den 
hen 
men 



I 



et 



eg 
let 



met 
net 
set 



peg 
pen 

pet 



red 
vex 
wet 



bid 
big 
bit 

box 

fox 

dog 

bud 
bun 
but 



did 
dig 
dim 


fit 


him 

his 

hid 


lip 

Pig 
pm 


fog 

hop 

hot 


mop 
nod 

not 

1 


pop 
pod 
pot 

n 


rob 
rod 
rot 


cup 


1 
hum 


mud 


rub 


cut 
gun 


hug 
hut 


mug 
nut 


rug 
run 



rid 
sit 
tin 

sob 
sop 
top 

sun 
sup 
tub 



Words of four letters. 



Band 
bank 



riad 

[at 



have 
hand 



lass 
fast 



sash 
sand 



flax 
land 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. I. 15 



beU 
best 
desk 



- 


e 




fret 


nest 


1 mend 


left 


rest 


send 


lent 


west 


sell 



tell 

well 

when 



dish 
fish 
give 
live 



hill 


milk 


sing 


fill 


mist 


silk 


kiss 


pini , 


ship 


king 


ring 


skip 



spm 
swim 
will 
wish 



blot 
doU 
drop 

burn 

duU 

drum 



glass 

grass 

plant 

shall 

stamp 

stand 

jsmell 



fond 
frog 
irom 



^ durst 
j hurt 
! hush 



gone 
W 
lost 



u 



jump 
lump 
must 



pond 
shop 
song 

plum 
purr 
shut 



Words of five an2l six letters. 



spell 

spend 

bless 

dress 

flesh 

fresh 

shelf 



The vowels atnart, 

shell 

bring 

brisk 

brink 

frisk 



si)ring 
stiff 



still 

sting 

string. 

cross 

strong 

blush 

brush 



soft 

spot 

stop 



spun 
sung 
curb 



crust 

grunt 

snuff 

stung 

strut 

trunk 

huff 



19 



JUVENILE SPELLmO-BOOK. 

Words containiag^ short diphthongs* 



Dead 
deaf 
head 
bread 



death 
breath 
earth 
learn 



pearl 
tread 
spread 
thread 



said 

say^ 

guess 

mend 



been | buUd * | guilt | quill 



blood 
flood 



Cake 

care 

gave 

air 

fair 

hail 

tail 

rain 

vain 

Eve 

ear 
eat 
east 
pea 



1 



doe* 
touch 



young 
dove 



f he laag soond of the Towels and diphfiioDgs. 
Vowels and cUphthongp like a in fate. 



face 

Jane 

James 

clay 

day 

hay 

gain 

gray 

hair 



haste 

miside 

make 

may 

maid 

way 

play 

say » 

stay 



Vowels and dipMhongs like e in me. 



she 

read 

bleat 

clean 

mean 



here 

steal 

wheat 

bee 

see 



take 

tape 

grape 

break 

great 

n*ail 

snait 

THcy 

THeir 

Tiiese 
week 
geese 
green 
sheep 



i^AIERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. I. 17 



tea 


leave 


feed 


deep 


dear 


sheaf 


feet 


sweet 


fear 


shear 


keep 


sleeve 


leaf 


speak 


tree 


field 


neat 


squeak | weed 


1 piece 


VoweU and diphthongs like i in pine* 




Ice 


kind 


nice 


blind 


bite 


kite 


ride 


wipe 


dine 


like 


ripe 
side 


shine 


fire 


mice 


smile 


sire 


mild 


time 


quite 


line 


mind 


wine 


spice 


die 


pie 


tie 


buy 


lie 


rye 


vie 


eye 


Voweb auoi diphthongs like « in no. 




Old 


home 


roll 


bone 


cold 


hope 
mole 


rose 


stone 


gold 


told 


smoke 


hold 


most 


tone 


stroke 


coat 


cloak 


low 


grow 


load 


toast 


mow 


show 


road 


door 


blow 


snow 


roar 


floor 


crow 

■ 


sew 


Vc 


>weU and dijihthangs.like u in tnute. 


i 


Use 


fume . 


pure 


tune \ 


cure 


mule 


tube 


plume 1 


du^s 


clew 


new 


flew 


hue 


few 


pew 


evre 


^ blue 


mew 


blew 


view 



18 



JUVB»IILE SPELUNG-BOOK. 



The middle sound of the vowels and diphthongs. 

1 




Like a in far. 


Art 


cart harm 


part 


are 


card 


lark 


tart 


bark 


far 


large 


sharp 


dark 


hard 


star 


smart 


hart 


jaunt 


heart 


launch 


aant 


guard 


hearth 


haunch 


r 


Like in ntorc. 


Coo 


prove 


whom 


do ' 


lose 


JL 

who 


whose 


Rome 


move 


noon 


brooia 


shoe 


cooi 


poor 


goose 


you 


too 


root 


.shoot 


true 


food 


room 


spoon 


fruit 


moon 


soon 


stool 


your 


• 


' Like u in, 6uU. 


Bush 


full 


puss 


bull 


push 
book 


pull 


put 




look 


good 


foot 


cook 


rook 


hood 


wood 


hook 


took stood 


wool 


The bj 


road sound of the vowels and diphthongs. 


\ 


^owels and diphthongs like a in faVL» 


Ball 


tall 


warm 


scald 


call 


wall . 


M^art 


small 


fall 


salt \ 


false 


swarm 


daub 


daw 


clqiw 


shawl 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASd-BOOK, NO. I. 19 



fault 
gauze 



caw 



paw 
raw 

saw 



I draw 
lawn 
crawl 



straw 
bread 
George 



Proper diphthongs, in which hotli the vowels are sounded. 
<n and 01/, as in boy; ou and ow^ as in eow. 



Oil 


joy 


T«OU 


round 


boil 


toy 


cloud 


cow 


moist 


our 


found 


how 


iioi^e 


out 


house 


. now 


spoil 


loud 


mouse 


owl 


voice 


shout 


pound 


growl 


boy 


sour 


ground 


down 




Irregular sound 


s of the voweld. 


t 




a like short, as in 710/. 




Wat 


wash 


want 




wast 


wasp 


what 






t like 1 


i short. 


• 


dirt 


flirt 


first 


bird 


shirt 


spirt 


stir 


squirt 


• 


i like e 


short. 




birth 


firm 


girl 


skirt 


mirth 


gird 


girt 


whirl 


/ 


olikei 


lesliort. 




come 


glove- 


some 


work 


done 


love 


son 

word 

t 


worm 


dove 


none 

i 


world 



20 

lord V 

cord 

cork 

crnde 
rude 

* 

TBtere 



JUVENILE SPELLING-BOOK. 

o like a broad. 



fork 

horse 

storm 



born 
com 
horn 



u like middle. 



rale 
brute 

V 

where 



prtide 
prune 

yes 



foi^ 
nor 
short 

truce 
spruce 

her 



Words containing: consonahts not flOimde<}. 



Wottb with silent consonants, the vowel or diphthong bating: the sbdrf 

or the middle somid. 



b silent 

Lamb 

limb 

dumb 

thumb 

crumb 

g 
gnat 

gnash 



k 
back 
black 
quack 
neck 
pick 
sick 
? trick 
I quick 



rock 

clock 

mock 

duck 

knit 

knot 

knock 

/ 
calf 



half 

cahn 

could 

should 

would, 

to 
wrap 
wrist 
wrong 



Wiffds with Bilent consonants, tiie Towel or diphthong having tlM 

long or Uie broad sound. 



b sikni 
ClmA 
comb 

.8 i 



reign 

gnaw 

I k 

knife 

know 



knee 
knead 

i 
talk 
walk 



I 



stalk 
yolk 
folks 

high 



*^Zi»uci&IiwlMf aiB|Aer«|f0&«ri; ^•AmU'w jft»; vtAtiummhen 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, Nof L 21 



sight 


sigh 


taught 


d<Migh 


bright 


thigh 
eight 


bought 


though 


fight 


ought 


tv 


li^ht 


neigh 


thought 
bough 


write 


might 
ni^t 


straight 
caught 


wrote 


plough 


sword 


CwMNiantSy tm^le ^od. doable, which haT« different lotindi. 




' Single coniona^ts. 




■ 


€ t^ard like k. 


, 


Canh 


jcnim 


clash 


scar 


crab 


curd 


cling 


scum 


can 


cold 


creep 
crawl 


count 


call 


cool 


crown 


1 


e loft ^e f . 




dance 


pence 
fence 


since 


hence 


dunce 


prince 


whence 


lace 


nice 


cease 


joice 


place 


price 


pie;Ge 


voice 


• 


ghard. 




glad 


gasp 


glass 


grand 


grin 


gust 


gitiss 


gland 




^•oft. 




gem 


gin [age 

f diarp* 


hedge 


sand 


pass 
less 


dress 


nurse 


send 


gloss 


purse 


seed 


haste 


goose 


seat 


side 


^a9te 


straw 


sweet 



22 



JUVENILE SPELLING-BOOK. . 



# 


/ s flat like z. 




hi^ 


stairs 


leave* 


bed* 


heir^ 


staves 


beam 


head* 


keys 


hare« 


pear* 


plea*e 


tea^e 


ware^ 


praise 


need* 




Double consonants. 






th sharp. 




thank 


thick 


breath 


cloth 


think 


thin 


health 


thing , 


three 


throw 


teeth 


north 


throne 


throat 


rnouth • 


south 




TH flat. 




THan 


this 


that 


bath* 


then 


thus 


thqiii 


path* 


they 


the^e 


thy 


clothe^ 


their* 


tho^e 


thine 


smooth 




ch]\kefyh. 




Charles 


chin 


much 


rich 


charge 


chick 


such 


which 


chair 


cheese 


coach 


peacli 


child 


choice . 


couch 


reach 




ch like sfL, 


- 


inch 


bench 


tench 


French 


pinch 


bunch 


stench 


chai*e 


, 


ck }ike k. 




chyle 


cha^m scheme 

gh and ph like /. 


school 


rough 


cough 


phiz 


nymph 


tough 


laugli 


phrase 


soph 



AMERICAN SCHOOL Ct ASS-BOOK, NO. I. 23 

Easy profreMiye phrafiv 9Skd sentences, comuting^ of words of OBt 

syllable! 

8^^ TIm cembininf of lueh word* into phrtwi or .mtMiaM, •■ tli* Mf—r bw ymiiwwly iprilrf 
IB a i rt ae i wd &rp, will aid bin maimuUy io^acqiuiwf tba ut of rttdii^. 

Go on. .1 am. An egg. 

Go up. Go ilk A top. 

I do. She is. A fox. 

r 

He !§. I cry. A hen. 

We go. An eye. An ant. 

An ox. . A pin. A cat 

A fly. The dog. I try. 

The sky. A pig. I fly- 

Is he up? It is I. She is illu 

So am 1. I am up. Try to gQi< 

Do go on. We do go. Is it he? 

As I do. So do I. Yes it i?. 

I go in. We go on. So it is 

I do so. So be it It is so. 

Will he go? I can hop. Will she comer 

Not to-day. She will run. Go and ask. 

You can go. We are in. By and by. ' 

Get my hat. It is odd. Do not stay. 

Put it on. All is well. Let us try. 

Let us go. She is here. It is safe. 

A dim eye. The red sky. A sly fox. 

» 

He is to go. I am to so. I am to be. 
It is my ox. It is my hat. It^smjrpep^ 



24 



JUVENILE SPELLmG-BOOK. 

Progressive. 

(Th« ohild dwtOd U Uoght to TMd aoron th* pfl.) 



A pen case. 
A bad boy. 
A small top. 
A hot day. 
A tall tree. 
A' sweet cake. 
A fresh breeze, 
A wild duck. 
We can run. 
It is cold. 
Bring the cup. 
Feed the lan^bs. 
The boys play. 
The cat purrs. 
The mule frisks. 
A new wheel. 
A true friend. 
A thick cloud. 
Mend my pen. 
RJng the bell. 
Clean your teeth. 
Brush my hat. 
Help yourself. 
Life is short. 
Shun all strife. 
Tell no lies. 
Time runs fast. 
Live in peace. 



A tin box. 
A good girl. 
A nice toy. 
A clear sky. 
A green leaf. 
A sour peach. 
A cool room. 
A lame goose. 
Do not stay. 
The fire burns. 
Drink your miik. 
Shear the sheep. 
The girls learn. 
The d og barks. 
The horse trots. 
A strong cart. 
A safe guide. 
A dark day. 
Cut the quill. 
Pull the cord. 
Wash your hands. 
Black my boots. 
Eat some grapes. 
Art IS long. 
All must die. 
Speak the truth. 
Death is sure. 
God is just. 



American school class-book, no. l 



25 



ProgpTcssive. 



J)!^^ Wh«n (ie learner is sufficiently aJvtnc«(] in spelling and reading to eommrnce the 'f'tdt of 
fraonaar, these or similar Mntcnces wiU be foiiiiJ well ad\|itecj to rxcrniplify s^d illuttr^ta th% 
rolei aad deHuiUons cootaioed ia the " lusaeobalji of £b(;li«b Gri'ininar/' ajreoded to this work. 



^ mad dog. 
A dull axe. 
The wet grass. 
The full moon. 
The cows low. 
The fish swims* 
Boys love play. 
Wolves kill sheep. 
Hoe the corn. 
Fly the kite. 
"Reap the rj^e. 
ScoUr the knives. 
Thrash the wheat. 
Dress the hemp. 
Prune the trees. 
Sail the ship. 
Bake some pies. 
Make some toast. 
Bring the w^ine. 
The doves coo. 
The bells chime. 
The wind blows. 
The duck^ quack. 
The bear growls. 
The wolves howl. 



A wild hog. 
A sliarp knife. 
The sweet pinks. 
Tlie briglit stars. 
The horse neighs. 
The birds feing. 
Men seek fame. 
Hawks eat birdsl. 
Pull the flax. - 
Spin the top. 
Mow the grass. 
Clean the forks. 
Shell the corn. 
Card the wool. 
Make the fence. 
Row the barge. 
Roast some beef 
feoil some ham. "^^ 
Fill the glass. 
The birds chirp. 
The clock strikes. 
The waves roll. 
The geese hiss. 
The hounds yelp. 
The sheep bleat 



26 



Wfjii?' 



\^UV£NIL£ SP£LUNG-BO(& 



Prog;re8siVie. 



A new brick house. 
A nice quince pie. 
A wide deep stream. 
A large cool room. 
A small sour pear. 
A new red cloak. 
A bowl of plum9. 
A dish of soup. 
A cup of coffee. 
The bloom of youth. 
The aim of man. 
A pail of sweet milk. 
A sack of ripe peas. 
A yard of fine 3ilk. 
Let me spin my top. 
I ran a mile to-day. 
The tide runs high. 
I had ill luck. 
Tou and I err. 
Do not cheat me. 
Leave off* bad tricks. 
Strive to do right. 
Be in good cheer. 
Use no ill words. 
Shun all bad boys. 
Heed not bad men,, 
Tear to do ill. 
ftfli)^ ^hat i^ said. 



A large frame barir. 
A small sweet peach. 
A strong )5tone bridge 
A dark damp cell. 
A sweet green boan. 
A nice gold ring. 
A pound of prunes. 
A piece of beef. 
A slice of bread; 
The pride of life. 
The love of fame. 
A flask of good rum. 
A peck of white beans: 
A skein of fine thread. 
Let us hoe the corn. 
Please to let me rest 
We must go home. 
I will not fret. 
It is our faults. 
We must shun vice. 
Thou shalt not steal. 
Peace be with you. 
Learn to be good. 
You must not swear. 
Dread an ill act. 
Wise men seek trpth. 
View vice with hate. 
JL^pyp and fear Qod. 



fc. I 



AMERICAN SCHbOL CLASS-BOOK, NO.^ I. 27 



Progressive. 



Do as we do. 
She will not go. 
Let us go in. 
Do brush my hat. 
Fell me his name. 
He is a good boy. 
Boys love to play. 
My ball is lost. 
I lost my shoe. 
My hand is lame. 
Whos^book is this ? 
Give it Home. - 
Will you hear me.^ 
The ship is built 
It has set sail. 
The 6elds are green. 
The grain is ripe. 
There is a bee ! 
Now it is gone. 
The kite is high. 
The cord is long. 
I have been ill. 
Now I ain well. 
It is quite dark. 
What o'clock is it.'^ * 
It is quite late. 
We must be good. 
I love the Lprd. 



Try to do so. 
He is quite ill. 
Now go to Ann. 
What boy is that? 
It is James Gray. 
You are quite kind. 
May I go and play.^ 
I must find it. 
I hurt my foot. 
Try to cure it. 
It is my book. 
I like to read. 
Read all this page* 
Now it can sail. 
It is on the sea. 
See! the green wheat. 
Let us reap it. 
Do not hurt it. 
It IS gone home. 
It is my kite. 
J)o not break it. 
Give me some drink.. 
I must gp home. 
It is dark night. 
It is eight o'clock. 
Let us go to bed. 
3ad boys do harm. ' 
God save us alL 



2« 



gfprvmx SPELLIRG-BO^ 



iTC* 



JBTow do you do? 
I hope you are well. 
Reach me a chair. 
What is your name? 
To ^eam my vtask. 
Now I will read. 
Where is my book? 
Is it school time ? 
We shall be late* 
When may I go? 
Where shaU I Bit? 

■ 

Be a ffood boy. 
Can you read weU? 
Xiet me hear you. 
The sky is blue. 
The moon is full. 
The mom is clear* 
The dews ^te fresh. 
The days ai:e short 
The sun is set. 
The rose smells sweet. 
The stars look dim. < 
The wind blows hard. 
Cease to do wrong. 
Be kind to all. 
Call Qo iU names. 
Give alms to the poor. 
Po as you are bjid. 



Please to come in. 
Come near to me. 
Sit down by us. 
What is your wish? 
I will say it well 
Will you hear me? 
Have vou seen it? 
Yes, the bell rings. 
We must go soon. 
To-day^ if you please* 

Love tour deaiihends. 
Tes, I tlnnk I can. 
Read all these words* 
The air is pure. 
The Ught is pale. 
The sun is bri^t. 
The fields are green. 
The ni^ts are long. 
The mooa is up. 
The grass looks green. 
The clouds are bJac]^ 
The rain faUs fast 
Strive to do good. 
Treat no one ilL 
Frown at foul deeds. 
Love all good boys. 
Speak well of all. 



X 



AMERICAN SCBtiOh CLASS-BOOK, N0« 1!. 29 

» 

Frog^essire. 

Come here and 6it hj me. 
i wish to hear you read. 
Run first and get your book. 
i)o you know where it is? 
. ifeis, I think it is in school. 
James, have you seen his book? 
iThere it lies, on the floor. 
You should not leate it Ihere. 
Go, child, and bring it to me. 
f think I teft it in my desk. 
Look! some one has torn it 
Where did you read to-day.'* 
I will soon nnd the place. 
Aere it is. I£ reads thus: 
Live in peace with all men. 
Of two ills choose the least 
Do not league with bad men. 
Lie not, but speak the truth. 
Play with none who are bad. 
Make the best use of time. 
Be not too proud to learn. 
Boast not of what you know. 
Wise and good men are scarce:^ 
Vice is the bane of life. 
We should love and fear God. 
This world was made by hixn, 
He gives m life and food. 
He is our trufe and good IHeiid. ^ 



30 JUVENILE SPELLING-BOOK. 



Progressive. 



Let us all try to do oo ill. 
Go not in the way of bad boys. 
They will try to do you much hurt. 
You and I must die, soon or late. 
He who made us, is kind to us. 
We ought then to love and serve him. 
Speak the truth at all times. 
Sin will leatd us to pain and wo. 
Lo5'e that which is good, and shun vice. 
He must live well that M^ould die Well. 
Be just and true and kind to all. 
Take your book and read with care. 
Keep in your place, and be not rude. 
He who goes with bad boys will fall. 
A bad life must make a bad end. 
But he who does what good he can, 
Will gain the love of God and man. 
Go to the ant, you that love sloth; 
Think well on her M'ays, and bd wise. 
She does not waste all her time in play. 
She lays up food for time to come. 
Help such as want help, and be kind. 
We should pray for those Uiat hate us. 
Hate no man, but strivre to love all. 
A vi'hc. child loves to read his book. 
A dunce loves to play with mere toys. 
Let not prjde have a place in thy hearty 
But sirive to be meek, and fear God: 
And do all that jb right, just, and proper. 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOi; NO. i. 31 



ve. 



The sun shines. It is time to get up. Jane^ 
come and dress Charles. Wash his race, and 
neck, and make him quite clean. Comb his 
hair. Tie his frock. 

Now, Charles, we will go dowp stairs. Sit* 
down. Here is 'some milk; and here is a piece 
of bread. Do not spill the milk. Hola the 
sppon in the right hand. 

The crust is hard; dip it in the milk. Do 
not throw the l>read on the floor. We should 
eat bread, and not waste it. 

There is a popr fly in the milk. Take it 
out. Put it on this dry cloth. It moves; it 
shakes its wing$ ; it wants to dry them; see 
how it wipes them with^ its feet 

Put the fly on the floor, where the sun shine?* 
Then it will be dry and warm. I am glad it 
was not dead. I hope it will soon be well 

Where is puss? Tiiere she is. Do not hurt 
her. Charles does not like to be hurt; and 
puss does not like to be hurt. Feed poor 
pw». Give her some milk. Now as Charlefli 
18 so kind to her^ she will not scratch or bite 
him. She purrs apd looks glad. 

Let us take a walk in the fields, and see 
the sheep, and the lambs, the cows, and treesi 
and bir^s. Call Tix^y. He shall go with us. 
He is glad to see us. Feed poor Tray^ Traly 
]ik;es thoie who feed him, and are kind to hioBu 



32 



JUyCVILE SFELUNG-lfOQK. 



Words of ^two syllables. 

* • *■ 

In order to ^etennitie the pronaad^lion of the words in the tpeU* 
ii)gf lessons, they ai-e analogically arranged ih small divifiioini' accord* 
ing to the precise sounds of the vowels. 

Every word^in cax^h of these subdivisions, has the cofrespondfaig 
vowels or diphtliongs in each of the syllables, sounded ejsictly afijce. 
r The leading word,\,which determines the pronunciation of the 
class to which it b^loagB, is distinguished by a capital letter. 



The accent on the first syllable. 
All the syllables short. 



ATy sent 
ac cent 
bad ness 
flan nel 
grav el 
Wap kin 
ac live 
cab bage* 
pas sage 
basket* 
blan ket 
bran che5 
rag ged 
A\ lum 
dam ask 
backxyai^d* 
ban ter 
mat ter 
after 
anger 



bat' ter 

an strer 

chap ter 

chat ter 

la:d der 

sam pier 

am ber 

tat tier 

Bel man 

break fast 

§tead fast 

phiea^ antt 

plea^ ant 

ser vant 

tres pass 

pref ace 

men tal 

med al 

ex tract 

mer chant |s^p tre 



head land 
herd^ man 
Cred it 
crev ice 
fer tile 
ver min 
ex it 
hec tic 
bless ins: 
learn ir| 
self ish 
ser vice 
Aer bage* 
cer tain 
bed ge^ 
Ches/ nut 
b*eg gar 
bet ter ^ 
fet ter 



en tei' 
ev er 
pep per 
shep Aerd 
lem on 
mel on . 
sel dqm 
meth od 
Brick bat 
dis tance 
itffant 
instant 
distaff 
kim man 
wind lass 
rid dance 
syl Tan 
syntax 
sig'iial 
kid nap 



<*«M4UiAi^dki«« 



^* •, fb 9d 9I. u i te p^ 



I ph M f. 



N 11 



AMEMGAN 45CHOOI* CLAS8kBOOH, NO. I. 33 



bf sect 
•ill ness 
cyg net 
fit ness 
ffin seoKi. 

L ut ^ 

guilt l&ss 
chil dren 
' gim let 
fin ish 
shil ling 
build ing 
sing ing 
81V1ID ming 
mis chief 
chick eh 
kitdi en 
lin en 
wick ed 
Hick up 
in jul^ 
pillar 
win ter, 
dif fer 
prim er 
prin ter 
mil Jer 
jriv er 
sister 



4 



litter 
lim ner 
sin her 
bit ter 
din ner 
fing ex 
timber 
lim bei: 
sil ver ^ 

gil fer 
ob web 
non sens^ 
com plex 
novel 
gospel 
prob lem 
con vert 
offset 
con. vex 
Bob bin 
gos Kng 
prom i^e 
robin 
ro^in 
con ic 
hor rid 
vom it 
top ic 
ol ive 



cot tage 
or ange 
quar rel 
Con duct 
dol lar 
prop er 
offer 
cop per 
doc tor 
com mon 
bios 8om 
bqt tom 
scol lop 
spon sor ' 
Nius lin ' 
curtain , 
pun ish 
tur hip 
pub lie 
rus tic 
bur nish 
sul len 
com ing 
worship 
Murmur 
sub urb 
hu^ band 
flut ter. 
sum raer 



blus ter 
sup per 
than der 
blun der 
fur THer 
huck ster 
shut ter 
num ber 
clus ter 
plun de^ 
ua der 
gun ner 
fput ler 
mur der 
slum ber 
huh ter 
drum mer 
bux om 
cus tom 
ful some 
pur pose 
sum men 
broTH er 
moT«er 
smoTH er 
OTH er * 
won der 
gov em 
cov er 



a 



34 



jrUVENILE SPELLINGrBOOlC. 



The ttiaeetated toimd of^, at the end of a syBable, Uka drat df » 
iatllanmiitaatMm, iaalwaytmcethefintK>nndof4-^*tbiu: fwf, 
|ieuriigr«^proiMKmced fa ra, plu m ae, ilcc. 

All the syttables long. 



La' dy 
day ly * 
gravy 

£a stry 
iZJ 

late ly / 
iiafe ly 
state ly 
dairy 

MM} M ( 



dai ^y 
hai jry 
rai ny 
vain ly 



neat ly 
wea ry 
Like ly 
live ly 



Gree dy Mgh ly 
Bweet ly' ikind Iv 
ea^y 
dear ly 



sto ny 
holy 



{clear ly jno bly 



only 

glo ry 

Bml try 
uty 
fu ry 
sure ly 
pure ly 
new ly 
beau ty 



Tht daabli Utfui f*) Aowt te» tU MlowiBr aooMaftot w to bi praoflHuwad m haUk '^fi- 
oif pgr; premuoMd a«p' pjr ; bat the ftadior lM» divided the warik, to thftt, u « ' 
••■ibh, Moh ByUsUt i» a,dhtia«t leaBd, (tod M«b to***^ * ^Mtot qrlhMt. 



Hap' py 
alley 
carry 
an gry 
Mcr ry 
eher ry 
eil vy 

Pa' rent 
latent 
a ^eiit 
ja cent 
care less 



The fint syllable ihort, the secood h»g. 



plen ty 
hea vy 
early 
rea" dy 
Sil ly 

pf ty 
pit ty 



filthy 
quick ly 

?ret ty 
ol ly 
bo" dy 
CO" py 
sorry 



The firtt iqfrllable long, the second short. 



Turkey 
hun gry * 
sul try 
dus ky < 
hon ey 
mort ey 
mon key 



shape less thei noiis 



name less 

flain ness 
*a vour 
Jal(our 



pave meht |ta bour 



UQigh bout 
paper 
dra per 
trader 
patron 



tailbr 
trai tor 
Feel ing 
peel ing 

Eee visn 
earing 



^mm»» 



•Ordi#. 



AMERICUK SCHOOI4 CLASfirBOOK, NO. I. ,36 



hear ii]^ 

glean ifig 

mean ing 

reading 

ceil ing 

chief tain 

Fever 

ce dar 

east ward ISi lent 



deal er 
reap er 
lead er 
teach er 
eag er 
read er 
ei THer 
nei THer 



qui et 
kind ness 
blind ness 
Pi ous 
bri ar 
vi al 
li ar 
li on 
ti ger * 



tire some 
Tu mour 
Au mcHur' 
pew ter 
tu tor 
Mu^rie 
»tu pid 
fuel 
jew el 



The Boiddle sound of the vowels and diphthoogii. ' 
The second sellable short. 



Hstrm' l^ss 
art less 
dark nesa 
scarlet' 
har vest 
gar m^nt 

Earch ment 
ard ness 
large ness 
har Qess 



garnet 



sharp ness car tridge 
harsh ness 1 
Hard ship 
chcirm ing^ 
arch ing ]par eel 

Par lour 



card in«c 
jar ring 
far THing 
par tridge 



spark ling 



bar gain 
var nish 
car pet 



Ai'my 
bar ley 
pars ley 
parley 
Iji^tly 



I » 



lar ger 
char ger 
gar ter 

The second s^llabljs long. 



iaun dry 
Gloo^' my 
boo" ty 
roo'' my 
cool ly 



good ly 
smooTH ly 
woo" dy 
wool ly 
ru by 



fiiTH er 
mas ter 
Bloom Ing 
letoop ing^ 
do ing 
ru in 
cru et 
cru el 
fool ish 
Ru ral ■ 

rude ly 
crude ly 
pul ley 
ftiUy 
bully . 



f luuc^ 



D2 



36 



WaV irnt 
au tumfi 
daugh ter 
draw er 
hal ter 
8au cer 
alter 
wa ter 
wanner 



Sau'c;^ 
iaul ty 
hau^^ t; 
nsVLgh ty 
paltry 



Join' #r , 
dois ter 
^oil er 



lUVEfiraLE SPELLING-BOOK. 

llie broad sounU of the vowela and d^ihongs. 

• ■■ • 

The second ^UaUe shoift. \ 

or der 



orchard 
Bound l^ss 

Srow ess 
ou&t less 
coun sel 
Coun cii 
foqn tain 



howl IDg 
clown ish 
cow slip 
towel 
Coun 4er 
floun der 
polin der 
flow er ' 



mouhtaip jdower 

The second syUaUe lon^. 



pal^y 
taw ny 
taw dry 
forty 
stpr my 



lord ly 
Gouty 
sour ly 
hour ly 
jdow ry 



The second syllable short 



loi ter 
oys ter 
coin er 



foil er 

501 ^on 
'oil et 



loun ger . 
down ward 
now der 
fowl er 
now er 
bow er 
show er 
cow ard 
prowl er 



drow ^y 
clou dy 
coun ty 
proud ly 
boun ty 



oiiEit ment 
Foy iah 
Royal 



The first syllable short, the rowel of titte second scarcely perceptSbk. 



Can' die ' daz zle 



ap pie 
eac kle 
ancle 



*ii> ^ r 



han die 
fas ten 
hap pen 



rattle 
G)5n tie 
ket tie 
les scm 



■»• ' 



' r 



med die 
net tie 
peh ble^ 
pi^r son 



^AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-fiOOK, NO. 1. 31 



hcav' en 
reck on 
Lit tie 
kin die 
giv en 
lis fen 
prison 

Ba' con 
able 
basin 
era die 
& ble 
ma son 
taken 
ra v^en 



LtB, ment' 
kt tend 
amend 
at tempt 
again 
a gainst 
Ab sard 
af front 
among 
a mongst. 
a bove ' 



mid die 
nim ble 
sic kle 
sin gle 
thim ble 
whis tie 
wrin kle 



Bot tie 
gob ble 
cot ton 
oft €n 
soft ew 
Buc kle 
bun die 



'riie first syllable Ions'. 



Sta ble 
ta ble 
Nee die 
ea gle * 
e ven 
levil 
peo pie 
rea son 



steeple 
trea cle 
Bi ble V 
bri die 
{right en 
ri pen 
idle 
trifle 



crum ble 
dou" ble 
glut ton 
grum bU 
pur pie 
shovel 
trou" ble 

INo ble 
bro ken 
cho *en 
fro zeit 
open 
wo ven 
clo ven 



The accent on the second syllable.^ 
Both the syllables shdrt. 



;poken 



Neglect 
ex pect 
excel 

Eer verse 
►is tress 
him self * 
in tend 
in vent 
dis pense 
dis perse 
in'Vert 



Dis turb 
in dulge 
in struct 
in trust 
Con fess 
consent 
po^^ess 
com pel 
^on nect 
con tempt 
|coh tend 



Con cm 
con suit 
cor rupt 
Com mit 
con sist 
con vince 
Sub sist 
sub mit 
un fit 
un til 
un twist 



• ffterd^ 



S8 

Be have' 
de clare 
prjB pare 
re late , 
de lay . 
re fraiii 
de grade 
de bate 
de cay 



juvi^MUi spelling-book. 

Both syUaJ^loB Ion;. 



De tail 
de tain 
re strain 
Se rene 
se vere 
be liev.e 
be tween 
de ceit 
de ceive 



re ceiye 
re peat 
Be side^ 
de light 
di vide 
de By 
de sig-n 
re mind 
re quire 



Be fore 
be hold 
be low 
re pose 
re store 
Mq rose 
pro po^e 
pro voke 
pro mote 



The first syUable abort, the second l(m%. 



. Abate* 
a wake 

. ac quaint 
a fraid 
a way 
a maze 
ap prai^ 
a ware 
af fray' 
ab stain ' 
cam pai^n 
' En gage 
ex plain 
em brace 
per suade' 
main tain 
ex liale . 
exclaim 



Man kind 
ad mire 
a ri*e. 
ar rive 
trans pire 
ad vi^e ^ 
af ir%At 
ac quire 
a bide 

« 

apply 
as pure 
Mis take 
di^ grace 
di; dain 
in flame 
in SkBXe 
in sane 
in veisrh 



ex change mis piiace 



Ago 
a dore 
af ford 
alone 
a bode 
[aro^e , 
atone 
trans port 
trans pio^e 
ap proacb 
a slope 
Dis creet 
im peach 
dis plea^^ 
tsin cere 
Im bibe 
dis like 
di^ gui^e 
in quire 



in diet 
Abiwe 
ac ^u^e 
la mnsB 
traduce 
ab duce 
ad jure 
ab struse . 
a dieu 
abjure ^ 
al lude 
al jure 
Un ripe 
un tie 
sur pri/e 
un kind 
Sup po^e 
sup gort , 
cm knowii 



AMERICAN SCH6OL CLASS-BOOK, NO. I. 39 
'Thffirat^yilabl^loDgf, the seoond short. * ' 



Sedan" 
re caai; 
re past 
re tract 
de tract 
re lax 
re tract 
de cant 
de camp 
re lapse 
be chai^ce 
E ject 
e rect . 
e vent 
de fend 
de pend 
de *erve ^ 
de fence 
de ject 
pre fer 



de *ert 
defect 
de s^end 
ve flefct 
re ject 
pe que^ 
re spect 
re eret < 
ire fresh ' 
pre ^eat 
pre vent 
refer 
re ^ent 
re trench 
re venge 
re verse 
r^ pet 
select 
re lent 
be hest 



de test 
re peht 
de scpnt 
de press 
di rect 
di vest 
di gress 
di ffest 
DeVct 
e quip 
e clipse 
e vince 
be twixt 
re miss 
re strict 
refit 
re print 
begin ^ 
pre diet 
rerist 



re Bcind 
Pro fess 
pro tect 
pro test 

!')ro pense 
b meot 
De spond 
be long 
be yond 
re iolve 
re vol vc 
De mtir 
re flux 
re suit 
re fund 
de duct 
re turn 
re judge 
e come 
e nough • 



i 



Th« broad sound of th6 vowels and diphthongs. 
The first fyllahlo short. 



Ap pal' 
ap plaud 

a ward 
bash aw 
a broad 
at) hot 



a dom 
Perform 
ex tort 
ex Aort 
Mis cal 
in stall 



WITH d^raw 
inform 
dis tort 
A mt>unt 
an noy 
appoint 



a void 
Ert joy 
em ploy 
enjoin 
em broil 
ex ploit 



• cbMf. 



m 

Disjoin' 
dife joint 
in join 
subjoin 



>UVENIIiE SfELUNG'BOOK. 



pnt loin 
tur' moil 
Al low 
a loud 



around . 
a rouse 
Ex pound 
Dis count 



• .♦ 



The first syllable !bng^. 



Reqair 
befaU 
be cau^e 
reward 
de fraud 
e cla^.- 
bedaub 
de bauch 
re«)rt 
be ioughi 



re tort 
de form 
re fprm 
re morse 
Decoy; 
de §troy 
re coil 
sphe' roid 
de vpir 
re joice 



de, spoil 
re coin 
ime moir ' 
de yoid . 
re join 
Pro found 
pro nounce 

grp pound 
le nown. 
re cQunt 



mii^ count 
Sur mdunt 
sur round 
un SQUixd 

be foul 
renounce 
re dound 
re dou6t 
re bound 
de vout 
de vour 
e •pou<9e 
re ^ound 
de nounce 



The.mid(Qe stfund of the ToKrek and diphthongs. 
The first syllable short. 



A larm' 
apart 
Dis arm 
di^ bark 
did card 

\ *^ 

De part' 
be caAn 
re gard 
re mark 
re tard 



Em bark 
en large 
Bab oon 
bal loon 
drag oon 



rack oon' 
shal loon 
ap prove 
Fes toon 



im prove 
in trude 
Buf fdon- 
undo 
Dis pVcvc |iin truth 



The first syllable long;. 



Where to 
Fore warn 
fore doom 
Behoof 
be took 



be hoove 
be fool 
re proof 
here to 
fe prove 



re move 
je June 
de trude 
re cruit 
re prude 



AMERICTAN SCHOOI. CLASS-600K, NO. I. . 4] 

When tho Terbal terminaQoii ed, W noi^ preceded by d or /, the e is 
almost universally silent : as loved, filled, barred, saved, &c. which 
are pronounced -as if written lo\'d, filld, barrd, savd, ice. • ' 

When dort precedes ei, the e is fully pronounced ; a^ added, di- 
Tided^ commanded, waited, &c. ; . 

Wprds. ^nding^ in (wf. . . * v 

Pronounced as one syllable. ^ 



Beg'ged 
swell ed 
fled g^d 
kill ed 
lived 
mov ed 
prov ed 

Ask' ed 
hatch ed 
scratch ed 
thatch ed 
thrashed 
dress ed 
press ed 

Dread' ed 
mend ed 
tempt ed 
gild ed 
sifl ed 
lasted 
pat ted 
crabbed 



crown ed 
drown ed 
lov ed 
rub bed ^ 
scrub bed 
pray ed 
rai^ ed 



sa ved 
caU ed 
warm ed 
form ed 
plea* ed 
seal ed 
seem ed 



d sounded like L 



perch ed. 
stitch ed . 
fix ed 
mix ed - 
miss ed 
wish ed 
whip ped 



cross ed 
drop ped 
hop ped 
lofek ed 
nurs ed 
worked 
pla ced 



Pronounced as two syUaMes^ 



card ed 
cart ed 

Syart ed 
la ted 
shadi^d 
tast ed 
wait ed 
wast ed 



>^ 



past ed ' 
least ed 
seat ed 
treat ed 
mind ed 
sligM ed 
li^t ed 
fold ed 



bri bed 
ti red 
mowed 
sow ed 'i 
show ed 
mu *ed 
|u *ed 

scorch ed 
talked 
reach ed 
preach ed 
screech ed 
crouch ed 
raked 

load ed 
mould edi 
scold ed 
couHt ed 
shout ed 
pound ed 
halt ed 
wanted 



42 



JUVENILE SPELLIKG-^OOK. 
Prog;resst?ie» 



<htir 



M^ Worda of am, mo. Me. ^lablM awinWicd, to triiidi tfa*. driU mmf «tl»4ii 
itrwipact : ib»j ar* «1m wiubU aiifUiiplM 6» Ulustraliaf the prinoiplM of 



A cheerful boj. 
A kind friend. 
A fri)gty morn. 
An early spring. 
A cool ;|utumn. 
A sweet blossom^ 
A tall woman. 

r 

A high steeple 
A fine sample. 

A deep valley, 
A kind mother. 
A loving brother. 
A trusty servant. 
A green carpet. 
A gloomy cavern. * 
A rural village. 
The rustling leaves. 
The vivid lightning. 
The sweet moss-rose. 
The harmless doves. 
The stagnant water. 
The babbling brook. 
A field of barley. 
A barrel of cider. 
The buU bellows. 
The raven croak$. 
Cull the flowers. 
Get some. cewsUpi* 



A tidy girl. 
A good neighbour. 
A rainy day, 
A hot summer. 
A severe winter. 
A pretty daisy. 
A good figure. ' 

A large belfry. 
A blue ribbon. 
A lofty mountain. 
A tender iather.^ 
A friendly sister. 
A kind master. 
A. yellow curtaift. 
A frightful prospect. 
A pleasant town. 
The weeping willows. 
The loud thunder. 
The modest lily. 
The spotted leopard. 
The mud^y rivers. 
The foamipg billpws. 
A basket of currants. 
A gallon of spirit^. 
The lion roars^r 
The black bird Auff. 
Make a nosegay. 
Watjertheplatits. 



AMKBICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, KO. L 

Pr0greasiv«, 



43 



Lemons are sour. 
Silver is white. 
Millers griirid wheat. 
Farmers rais^ grain. 
Drapers sell cloth* 
The turkey gobbles. 
The swallow twitters. 
The quail whistles. 
Wash the linen. 
Shut the door. 
Sweep the floor. 
Lighl the lamp. 
Bring the snuflters. 
Boil some coffee. 
Broil some chickens.. 
Hold the pitcher. 
Break some biscuit. 
Bake some puddings* " 
Fry some oystei-s. 
Weed the garden. 
Bring the basket. * 
The spring is pleasant. 
The rain descends. 
The valleys are fertile. 
Tbe season is fruitful. 
The ciimato is -mil d. 
The M'inter is severe. 
Man is mertal. 
TTouth is fleeting. 
Fools hate ksow^ed^e. 



Honey is sweet. 

Gold is yellow. 

Bakers make bread. 

Tailoi^ make clothes* 

Cobblers mend shoes. 

The hen cackle^« 

The monkey chatters* 

The partridge drums. 

Dry the towels. 

Open the windows. 

Dust the carpet. 

Make the fires. < 

Snuff the candles. 

Set the table. 

Carve the fowls. 

Pour some cider.. 

Spi^ad the butter. 

Roast some mutton. 

Gret some sallad. 

Pick some parsley. ' 

Grather some peaches. 

The summer is ^arm. 

The water flows. . 

The flowers are fragrant. 

The harvest is ripe. 

The autumn is cool. 

The trees are leafless. 

. Death is certain. 

Virtue procures friends. 

Sluggards love sleep* 
B 



44 



JUVtNlLE SIpELUNG-BOQK. 

Pro^essive. 



^^ It k ft food Mcreiw fnr the kitriKtcr ti> jprononnec th««« tni timtlnr ttvitnem^uA t 
lib* Imuqm- to ipttli or wnte Uwa^ft At* or blmdc^boarJ, aoci, at iIm Mkinl titiM!, UH tfie parti if 
■pccch. 



Begin to read. 
I am sincere. 
Oblige jour friends. \ 
Instruct your brotliers. . 
Scorn an untruth. 
Obey your paipents. 
Give no offence. 
Insiilt naperson^ 
Keep from lying. 
Esteem good people. 
Correct bad habits. 
Praise excites envy. 
Regret succeeds foHyw 
Confess your faults. ' 
kettre to rest. 
Visit the sick. 
Reward the Cuithful. 
Vice degrades us. 
Correct vicious habits. 
Despise no man. 
Con^nit no crimes. 
Polly misleads us. 
Revere the godly. 
Relr on Qod. 
Belief secures us. 
To err is Kumati. 
,To swear is wicked. 
To liiFe is pleasant. 



Prepare to write. 

They are steadfast. 
. Regard good advice. 
' Protect your sisters. 
^Adhere to trutli. 

ftespect old age. 

Quarrel with none. 

Treat all kindly. 

Refrain from swearing. 

Virtue exalts us. 

Amend your ways. 

Avoid selfHDonceit. 

Jesting provokes anger. 

Crimes debase men* 
' Depart in peace. 

Assist the needy. 

ComAiend pious deeds. 

Abht^r wicked actions. 

Desist from bad conduct* 

God made all men. 

^nners deserve death. . 

Sin beguiles us. 

Faith upholds vs. 

Believe in J^us* 

God supports us. 

To forgive is divine* 

To steal is sinful. 

To die is dreadfutr 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOr, NO. h 



45' 



A new blanket* 
A ripe chestnut. 
A sweet turnip. 
A neat snrtout. 
A fine waistcoat. 
A sout orange. 
The damask rose* 
The cooling breeze.^ 
The shady groves. 
The craggy rocks. 
The fertile meadows. 
The twiiddii^ stars. 
The hapgyy (parents. 
Patience is a virtue* 
Do no mischief. 
Perform your 4,uty. 
Clothe the naked. , 
Xiive in friendship. 
•Shun all quarrels. 
Study your lesson. 
Always be honest* . 
Sin causes s6rrow. 
Death conquers all* 
Anger kindles r^ge 
Cherish not malice. 
Beauty soon fades. 
ILeep your promise. 
I^ourish the poor. 
''IVar ruins many. 
.Prudence saves expense 



/ 



A yard qf muslin. 
A bunch of s{Hnage. 
An ounce of pepper. 
A pair of stockiop. 
A piece of broadcloth* 
A peck of apples, . 
TIms sweetness of pinluu 
The blowing of wind^. 
The singing of birds. 
The pouring of floods. 
The culling of flowers. 
The shining planets. 
The loving children. * 
Anger is a fault* 
Quit your foibles. 
Tell no jfals^hooda. 
Feed the hungry* 
Love your teachers. 
Honour your parents. 
Learn your grammar. 
Shame follows vice. . 
Read the hdy Bible- 
Say y<>ur prayers. 
Love covers faults. 
Kindness makes friends. 
Reason goterns us. 
Finish yoiir writing. 
Support the infirm. 
Peace h pleasant. 
.Discord destroys f " 



46 JUVENILF SPELLING-BOOlf. 

Progreesive. 

JDo as joa -would be done by^ 
• We should render good for cvi!. 
Wc should do justice to all men. 
We should always reward merit. 
Despise not lihe poor and friendless. 
Let us never insult the distressed, 
ilespect is ever due to the aged. 
' • We must not spend our time idly. 
Strive to excel in your studies. 
Wisdom is much better than riches* 
Learning will- make life pleasant. 
W"e should envy none for their wealth. 
Gold cannot purchase ease or peace. 
W c snould neyer get* angry at trifles. 
A wi*>e man avoids being angry at all. 
We should try to improve our morals* 
Avoid gaming ; it is an evil practice. 
Do not confide in wicked men. 
Quarrel with none of your friends. 
Injure none of your playmates. 
D^iast not of the favours you bestow* 
We should delight in acts of kindness. 
We do not live fiu- ourselves only. 
Always think before you promise. 
Never persuade any one to do wi*ong. 
We shouW always avoid mischief. 
Live well, that you may die well. 
Good men forgive tltose w|po injure them. 
God forgives those who are humble. 
He f "• * * " * to redeem the w<lrld 



X 



AMERICA* SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. I. 47 

Progreseivc. 

None, who are able to work, should be iche. 

AH good boy's love wisdom more than plaj. 

A life-welKspent makes oid'age pleasant. . 

He who wants virtue wants all things* 

Correct the heart, and all will be right. 

The love of money is the root of much 'evil. 

Tfiose who steal will come to a bad end. 

Peace and plenty are the greatest blessings* 

Ail wish to be happy; few strive to be good 

We t^an confide in none, but the truly good* 

A wise person will not begin a quarrel. 

To forget a wrong is the best revenge. 

Of two evils, we should choose the least. 

One lie requires many more to cov^r it* 

We ought never to telf a lie^ even in jest. 

Nothing can be great which is not good. 

Do not practice what you blame in others* 

Imprint on your mind the love of ti*uth. 

Parents should govern, and children obey. 

Trust not too much in boasted friendship. * 

A friend in need is a friend indeed. 

Envy is the greatest cause of evil-speaking. 

To know one's self is the first step to wisdom* 

Try to be good, and you will surely be so. 

tVe should prefer our duty to our pleasure. 

Virtue is the only good of which man can boast* 

find as the world is, respect is always paid to virtue. 

Of all dreadful things, death is the most dreadful. 

God is worthy to be beloved and trusted. 

We can aeVer concfial a crime f^-om God* 



48 JUVENILE SPELLfNG'.BOOK. 

HAY-MAKING. 

• 

Hark ! what noi8C is that ! It is the mower whetHng 
his scfthe. lie is going to cut down the grass an<;l ii\e 
pretty flowers. The scythe is very sharp. Do not go too 
near it. Come into this field. See ! all the grass is cat 
down, , , - 

There is a great number of men sind women witti tiieir 
forks and rakes. Thdy toss, and spread, and turn the 
new-mown grass. How hard, tliey work ! Come let us 
help to make hay. O ! it is very hot I No matter ; we 
must make hay while the sun shines. 

How sweet the hay smells I When the hay is quite 
dry, it must be made into stacks. Hay is for sheep, cows, 
and horses ^o eat in winter, when the grass does not 
grow. 

THUNDER Ato LIGHTNING 

There has not been any rain for a great while. The 
ground is very dry and hard. The grass does mot look 
green, as it used to do. . It is brown : it is scorched by 
the suri. if it do not rain soon, we must water the trees 
and flowers, else they will die. 

The sun does not shine now : but it is very hot. It* is 
qu^ite sultry. There is no wind at all* The leaves on 
the trees do not move. The sky looks very black : and 
how dark it is \ A bright light shone tlirongh the room. It 
did not last long. It was lightning. ' 

Lightning comes from the clouds. Now it lightens 
agitin. What a noise there is in the air, just mver pur 
heads : That is thunden. How loud the thunder is ! It 
b^;ins to rain. O what large dtpps I Now it rains very fa9t» 



, AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. L 4lf 

THE ROBIN. 

. ' ■ I . . ■ 

There is a pretty robin flying about the room* We 
most ^ve him something to pat. Fetch some bread for 
him. Throw the crumbs on the floor. Eat, pretty robin, 
eat. He will not eat ; I believe he is afraid of us. He 
looks abo^t. and wxmders where he is ! 

O, he begins to cat \, He is no^ afraid now. He is very 
hungry. How pretty it is to see him pick up the crumbs, 
and ht^upon the floor, the. table, and the chairs! Per- 
haps, when he has done eating, he will sing us a song. 

But ^e must not keep him always. Birds do not 
like to be shut up in a room, or in a cage. They like to 
fly about in the air, and to pick up seeds, and to hop 
about on the grass, and to sing, white perched upon the 
branches of high jtr^es. 

And in spring, how busy they are building their nests, 
and taking care of their young ones.- Robin has flown 
against the < window ; he wants to ^\. out. Well, we 
will open the window, and, if he choose, he may fly 
away. . Tliere, now he is gonje. When he is hungry, he 
may come again. We will give him some crumbs. 

FAMILY FRIENDSHIP. 

liove your brothers and sisters. Do not tease nor vex 
them, nor call tlicm names $ and never let your hands be 
rused to strike them. 

If they have any thing,' which you would like to have» 
lo not be angry with themt or want to get it from 



OU JUVENILE SPELLING-BOOK. 

them. If jott have any thiog tliey like, fthare it>vitt\ 
them. 

Your parents grieve when they sec ydtf quarrel; they 
love you all) and they wish you to love one another, and 
to live in peace and friendship. JPeople will not speak,^ 
or tliink wi^ll of you, if you do not behave kindly to your 
parents, and to your brothers and sisiens. 

^ Whom,'* say dicy, « will persons lovfe or bier Und to, 
if they do not love their own father lind mother, who 
have done so much for them; and their own*^ brothers 
and 8istei*s, who have the same parents, and the same 
hoones as they have, and who are brought up with 
them.** , '^ 

Love your father and mother^ they love you, an J 
have taken care of you ever sinpe you ^re born : they 
loved you, aiid took care of you, even when you eould; 
not help yourselves, or when you could not talk, nor 
walk about, nor do scarcely any thing but cry, and givei 
a great deal of trouble. 

Who is so kind to you as your parents are ? Who 
tak^s so much pains to instruct you ? Who taaght you 
alihost every thing you know? Who provides food 
for you, and clothes, and warm beds to sleep on at- 
night? 

Who is so glad when you are pleased, and so sorry 
when ytm ath troubled ? When you are sick, and in 
pain, who pities you, and tendeHy waifs upon you ^ Wlio 
prays to God to give you health, and strength, and every 
good thing? ft i^ your parents. Tou should there&re do^ 
ail in your power to make them hi^py* 



jiMEBiCAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. I. 

Th (6 long: sousd of the vowels and diphiboogs. 

Vowels tad diphthong like a in fatt. 



SI 



Ape , 

ace 

aid 

ail 

aim 

aile 

ere 

gay 

gale 

brace 

braid 

brain 

brake 

chafe 

cliase 

rJaim 

crape 

ileig-n 

shame 

$hake 

fihade 

hcale 

save 

«ale 

sake 

sage 

slate 

sway 



whey 

rein 

slay 

snsire 

spake 

spare 

spray 

state, 

bait 

bake 

bare 

ake 

imre 

mare 

stairs 

baxHe 

glare 

base 

swear 

male 

safe 

race 

lace 

lake 

late 

hale 

case 

came 



cave 


paint 


dat^ 


glaze 


dare 


mace 


dame 


mail 


bear 


rake 


baize 


range 


bane 


raze 


blame 


rare • 


blaze 


shape 


rage 


grate 


haste 


spade 


stage 


whale 


wade ^ 


train 


skate 


trait 


brave 


praise 


scrape 


strange 


square 


plague 


drain 


tame 


drake 


pay 


fat^ 


plane 


fail • 


plate 


faint 

4 


prate 


faith 


stave 


fame 


waste 


ilail 


wake 


flake 


wave 


paste 


crave 


pain 


pave 1 



grace 

late 

dray 

snake 

lame 

quake 

trade 

slave 

tare 

vague 

twain 

stain ' 

traipse 

plain 

grain 

strain 

vale 

tray 

fare 

pale 

pane 

pare 

gaze 

clave 

glade 

game 

U'ame 

jflame 



52 ' 

eighth 

wage 

stare 

pace 

I>age 

gcile 

hail 

swain 



Beak 

bead 

heat 

leek 

lean 

lead 

keen 

heel 

mere 

mete 

meet 

reel 

seal 

sear 

seek 

sheet 

thief 

ea.ve 





-^ - ^. 


* 


' 


• 

JtJVENILE SrFM^i;?«3-BOOK. 


• 


tear 


gawge 


quail 


fei^n 


wear , 


gaol * 


strait ~ 


feint 


prey 


plait 


stray 


skein 


pear 


quaint 


steak - 


weigh 


vein 


maize 


blade 


slei^f A 


mail! 


saint 


chain 


THere 


maim 


weig-At 


scale 


yeil 


knave 


stain 


waist 


frei^At 



Vowels and diphthong^ like e in me. 



fee 

beet 

bean : 

beach 

clear 

creek 

creed 

deal 

smear 

screech 

queer 

rear . 

screak 

speed 

sneak 

teach 

steam . 

yield 

deep 

fleer 



each 

eave 

ce^e 

cere 

cheat 

cheer 

breed 

breeze 

feast 

feat 

ween 

meek 

meed 

wield 

glee 

beech 

cream 

shield 

cheap 

chief 



free 

fleet 

fleece 

greet 

griet 

heal 

heap 

hear 

mead 

pique 

heave 

heed 

peace 

peak 

peal* 

beast 

bleak 

wield 



seem 
seen 



\ 



seer 

siege 

priest 

sleek 

spear 

speech 

tre^t 

tear 

teal 

steel 

theme 

veal 

weal 

sneer 

tier 

niece 

brief 

bier 

zeal 

year 



» I 



/ 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. I. 5* 



weak 

learn 

"wean^ 

Bere 

seizp 

seine ^ 

sphere * 

spleen 

squeeze 

&queal 

steed 

reed 

reap 

i«am 

ipiay 

preach 

flea 



Mite 

lide 

Kle . 

bind 

WiTHe 

bribe 

brine " 

cite 

crim^ 

chide 

cli?»e 



leap 

least 

crease ' 

deed 

deem 

bleak 

bleed 

breach 

ceil 

drear 

wheeze 

beat 

meat 

meal . 

meer 

near 

neap 

Vowels -and diphthongs like t in piru. 



N 



near 
need 


liege 
shield 


mien 


suite 


cleave 


lieve 


dream 


wreaxH 


fierce 
freak 
freeze 
fleer 


peat 
peel 
peep 
peer 


scream 
blear 

• 


pierce 
plead • 


grease 


scene 


gneve 
league 
leak 


seam 

shriek 

shears 


least - 


skreen 


lee5 


streak 



find 
{Light 
gibe 
guide 
;uile 
lide 
hintl 
^trive 
hire 

islet 
|b%At 



kine 

mile 

mire 

niffA 

pli^At- 

prime 

rhyme 

scytee 

Size . 

slei^t 

slice 



*|>bMft 



slide 

snipe 

liiiie 

wire 

slim^ 

spine 

height 

fife 

spire 

splice 

swine 



Igleam 

beard 

steep . 

steam 

sweep 

teem 

veer 

wean 

sheath 

weep 

wheel 

^neel 

Arnead 

flee 

beam 

heath 

ley 

(hrive 

tfeynie 

tide 

ti^At 

tixne 

tribe 

trite 

twin« 

type 

scribe 
wi^e 



> ■* 



ttrilfak 



54 

vile 
vine 
while 
M hilst 

Fold 

bow 

boat 

soul 

board 

boast 

bloat 

bold 

source 

bolt 

bowl 

grope 

both 

c«al 

course 

coast ^ 

boax 

tode 

cone 

quote 

Huge 
lute 
mu^e 
mate 



JUVENILE SPELLjfirG-BOOK. 



glide 
shrine 
whine 
while 



wi^-At 

wild 

wright 



squire 
mine 
stride 
strife 



choir * 

Vowels anil diphthongs like o in no. 

hoar^ sloe court 

corps t form || mode 

doe horde 

dolt cove 

whole broach 

dome broke 

dose brome 

droll choke 

drone soap 
float ' loan 

flow gAost 

foam loaTHO 

ford lone 

goAl I grott^th 

goat lore 

rove bourn 

close moan 

globe moat 

gore ' groan 
firross 



more 

mote 

mould 

node 

no^e 

note 

rote 

hoard 

beau 

i)ole 
ore 
forge 
forth 
four 
prone 
goiird 
pro^e 
Jprobe 



hoe 

Voweli«Dcl^phth(mg8 like u in mute. 

stew 



spume 
sure ^ 
feud 



jlue jlewd 

lieu hew^ 

hew flute 

knew fuse 



•A«ik. 



7«r 



TfJsr 



strike 
stripe 

site 
knight 

roach 

roanl 

trow 

roast 

robe 

rode 

host 

croak 

loaf 

Ipam 

porch 

rogue 

scold' 

scope 

score 

scroll 

shore 

shorn 

shown; 

slope 

sluice 
flue 
cube 
dupe 



»« 



Dart 

parse 

giaiimt 

bard 

ba/m 

Prune 

shrew 

rue 

bruue 

cruise 

shrewd 

brew 

Touth 

Doom 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLAdS-BOOK, Na L 55 

n« middlo Mmiid of the vowels and dlphthongk 
Vowelf and diphthongs like A ia /ai'* 



yard 
marl 

Sark 
am 
marsh 
hark 

boon 

bQOt 

brood 

choose 

gloom 

groom 

tool 

fool 

stoop 



mark 

dark 

start 

charm 

farce 

harp 



scarf* 
march 



mart 
carl 
spark 
barge 



Like o in move. 

hoof 

hoot ' 

loom 

loon 

loose 

mood • 

tour 



group 
(moose 



noose 

pool 

proof 

roof 

roost 

wound 

hoop 

spool 

stoop 



[harsh 

parch 

scranch 

shsitk 

snarl 

starch 

swoon 

whoop 

sloop 

soup 

toota 

bloom 

loof 

moor 

ooze 



The short soimd of the ww^ and diphtfaongi. 



Batch 

Iflaiik 

branch 

brass . 

camp 

chaff 



firaid: 

glance 

lash 

mask 

patch 

rack 



draught* raft 



flank 
flash 



snatch 
splaih 



tang ' 

task 

twang 

chance 

dram 

fast 

u^rack 

class 

cramp 



lam6 

tract 

brand 

drank 

CTasp , 

«naek 

lack 

dash 

clasp' 



mn^^ 



••*« 



rank 

sack 

scrap 

brand 

catch 

rang 

rash 

rasp 

prance 



r 



.\» . &!>.'- 



56 

lance 

hang, 
trap 

Bet 
h^ 

blend 

breast 

cent 

cbe«t 

cleame 

cleft 

cres^t . 

dearth 

elkr 

eke* 

end 

etch 

fend 

(eoff 

fetch 

fledge 

germ 

Blink 

bUsa 

bride 

brink 

hmit 

ckiU 



clack 
dang 
casque' 

Vowels and diphthongs like e in mti. 



bhalt jyalye 
scant vamp 
|mateh ^ ^aft 



ffleii 
^ell 

lend 

nei^ve 

peck 

pelf 

pelt 

perch 

pert 

press 

quell 

speck «^ 

stead 

stealth 

stem 

step 

swept 

8we«^ 

sWetve 

^ Vpwislskn 

filch 

flinch 

flint 

flitch 

gift 

tgrim ' 



tenite 
term' 
deAt 

deck 

dense 

depth 

dr^g^' 

drench 

earl 

earn 

edge 

elm 

tent 

feU 

vetit 



helve 

hemp' ' 

herd 

Aerb 

jerk 

jest 

ketch 

next 

swell 

scent 

quench 

whelp 

zest 

realm 

rend 

sedge 

self 




scrip 
shrill 



sink 
sixth 



switch 
,^ thrift 
thrill 
tic^e 
twitch 



Ifiax 

slack 

jstack 



stem 

check 

ten]^ 

dwell 

threat 

rend 

verb 

verse 

twirl 

wealth 




ledfire 

ength 

dread 

(meant 

(whirl 

> • 
chink 

clinch 
* crisp 
crimp 



^J- 



lisp 
dint ^ 

:iid 

itch 
kick 
lick 



AMERICAN 

mince 

pri^m 

mint 

print 

hinge 

sling 



pL CLASSrBOOK, NO. T. §7 



Pomp 

prong 

block 

blotch 

botch 

flop 

dodge 



Luc^ 

luff 

lull 

lunch 

monk 

lurk 

month 

mumps 

numo 

punch 

purl 



s 



s<|uib 
nymph S 
ftquint • 
strict 
strip 



wring 

midst 

bridge 

whiAi 

whiff 

whig 



Vowels 9uul dLplithoogB lik« o In no/. 



dock 

lock 

dross 

fos^e 

froth 

knoh 

mosque 



shock 
notch 
flock 

stock 
scoff 

■ > 

solve 
stocks 



frost ' 

shone 

squash 

squat 

frock 

watch 

sconce 



Voweb tmd diphtii^gp like u in h^. 



husk 

durst 

rcMit 

rush 

rust 

shpve 

shrug 

shrub 

shun. 

spunk 

stuff 



stuipp 

surge 

thump 

judge 

pulse 

truck 

truss 

trust 

turf 

wrung 

tongue 



worst 

birch 

blur 

budge 

bulge 

bulk ' 

plunge 

drudge 

bump 

bung 

chump 



wind 
wink 
zinc 

?|[uii)be 
ringe 
wince. 



cough • 

clod 

clqg 

crop 

chops 

wand 

swamp 



church 

churl 

clump 

cull 

cijrj 

curse . 

curve 

scourge 

scrub 

worth 

sponge 






1 



98 



JtTVEmLE SPELLING-BOOK. 



'The broad sound of the Toweli and diphthoogi. 
Vowels and dii^itboqgs like a m fiUl. 



Bawl 

brawl 

ca/k 

l^ha/k 

dwarf 

caiue 



fawn 

maul 

Bauce 

scrawl 

sprawl 

ought 

vault 



scorch 
vaUDt 
ward 
scorn 
Corpse 
.nau^M 
sought 



whwrf 

qaaAn : 

quart 

groat 

frau^At 

broug^M 

wrought 



pauje 

Proper ttphOiODipBy In wUdi both the Yowekan sounded, 
ot and Ofy, aa ia ^ajr ; elf and ew^ M IB poimif. 



BroU 

troy 

coif V 

coil 

eoit 

foil 

point 

poise 

btioy 

bounce 

bound 



i bout 
fount 
brown 
browse 
dou&t 
ibut 
flour 
flounce 
foul 
fowl 
frown 



gout 

gown 

lounge 

louse 

trout 

mount 

ounce 

pouch 

rouse 

rout 

route 



scou^ 

scout 

scowl 

shroud 

stou^/k 

snout - 

spouse 

spout 

sprout 

trounce 

town 



I2r Meooijrilablei beia^ the roots or radicaUfrom whidi most ef 
the derivatiTe words are formed, copious lists of them h&ve been in- 
serted. The j adidoos teacher -wSk not only iuid them rery useful io 
ftidm^ the learner, in- acquyrin^ 8K2orrect pronunciation of tibe Tariotti 
rowel and di^thongal sounds, bat coniirtfi him in the orthografthyof 
iBany important woras in our homage ; aa ftcquisitien of preat atiiljr 
in'elenientary tnttructidho * ^ ■ 



-TJ#.-3«'T^ 



AM£RICAIf dCHOOL CLA^S-BOOK, NQ. h 59 

Progressive. 

We must do good to tliem tliat hate us, and use us UIj 
and love those who do m^t love us. 

Youj[QU9t not play with bad bojs, who throw stones^ 
fig^t and tell li^s : if jpu do, they will do you hurt : and 
those who «ee you. with them will think that you do tiie 
same. , ' ' 

Bad boys will call names and make game of good boys, 
and do, all kind of bad tricks, and will take from you all 
jour tops, kites and lialls ; so it is best not to go near 
them. 

A good boy does not get whipt, for he does not want 
it: a word spoke to him will make him good; for he 
minds what is said to him, and does as he ^ughtto do. 

If yon are a good boy, and strive to learn your* book, 
your friends will be sure to speak well of you : and I am 
sure it wilf please you more to hear your friends praise 
you, than all the line things they can give yoi;. 

Beware of vice, whose empire will control your free- 
dom ; avoid her snares, where certain ruin waits. 

The slaves of vice can never be^deemed free $ and a 
alave heever y^\l be who suffers hid own bad habits to 
^get the better of him» 

Freedom is one of the ^eatest blessings in the world* 
and life itself is bift of little value without it; but it is 
ip vain for any one to suppose himself free who is not 
also good. ' 

if we eiqpect or desire that Heaven should not forsake 
lis, we; should not forsake Heaven ; and let us always re- 
flect, jthat there is nothing solid but peace of mind, 
nottiB^: iastkne but virtue. 



W ' 



60 JUVENILE SPELLING-BOOK. 

Wordi of two iyUabl«e, with the accent on the finl. 
Th9 first syllable lon^, the second ahort« ^ 



Fa'tal 
pa gati 
va cant 
pa pal 
fa va 
drama . 
lay man 
vagrant 
fra grant 
fla grant 
states nmn 
main mast 
Ca dence 
hatred 
sa cred 
angel 
pale' ness 
payment 
brace let 
rai ment 
Gra lis 
pa pist , 
tarn brie 
}a ding 
ta king 
gra zing 
say ing . 



april 
na tive 
ba sis 

;la/ing 

ia ring 
sl^ivisn 
^a vish 
cai tiff 
bail iff 
plain tiff 
paint ing 
faint ing 
wear ing 
Sa tarn 
wayward 
gra ter 
dan ger 



ba ker 
na dir 
Cham ber 
stran ger 
ra zor 
apron 
may or 
ma tron 
major 
sail or 
jailor 
waiter 
painter 

er 

break ^r 
bear er 
wei^^ er 



game ster sa vour 



manger 
qua ver 
sera per 
wa ver 
raker 
sa bre 
on p^r ' 
taper 
ma ker 



lamom 
va pow 
fla vour 
Le^gal 
re gal 
Hcaman 
free man 
^teel yard^ 
De cent 



re cent , 
se quel 
fre quent 
neat ness 
clear ness 
cheap nbss 
leafless 
Deist 
e diet 
see ing 
ze nith 
the is( 

eve mng 
meet, ing 
breed ing 
steer age 

peerage 
se eret 
mea^e* 
lead ing 
year ling 
teach ing 
thiev ish 
ieast ing 
fearing 
treatise 



•v^ 



V. 



*4|^Mwa4ifUKkU M iMjkr* 



•^"1^ 



' ■ ' -^ 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK,. NO. L 61 



Ge' BUS 

metre 
mea gre 
bea ver 
east ern 
weav er 
griev ous: 
free doin ' 
Rival 
vi tal 
bi as 

fi ant 
«al 
gui dance 
li lach * ' 
hy dra 
hLorA land 
fi^braed 
Cli ent 
di et • 
J tern 
li bel 
li cense - 
ei lence 
si ren 
life less 
hjr men 
by phen t 
cy press 



Cri sis 
ti ding^ 
ri ding 
hire ling 
li ning 
wTi ting 
fi ling« 
fire sliip 



*m»m^ 



mng 
t£iild ish 
Pi brous 
ci phet t 
r&ymer 
spi der 
li^A^ ter 
li vre 
mi ^er 
cider 
ni tr^ 
cri er 
fibre 
mi tre 
vi per , 
pli ery 

i lot \ 
iron 
riot 

dol 
minor 



fire work 
Oval 
lo cal 
vo cal 
so lar 
to tal 
po iar 
so fa 
quo ta 
cho ral * 
yeo man 
hold fiist 
boat man 
fro ward 
O men 
poem 
no ti^d 
potent 
CO gent 
o vert • 
mo ment 
Sto ic 
post age 
mo tive 
no tice 
flo rist 
spor tive 
ro gujsh 
mole hill I 



gold finch 
gold smith 
bolt sprit 
cloth ing 
poul tice 
-mourn ii^. 
Oak urn 
o ver 
own er 
porter 
so ber 
toper 
Vol! er 
bro ker 
dro ver 
clover 
tro ver 
bolster 
o chre * 
icoax er v 
boast w 
board er 
bolt er 
coul ter 
mourn er 
home spuib 
quo rum 
cho rbs * 
Iso joum 



^o' bou8 
odour 

So rous 
ole some 
lone fiome 
whole some 
glow worm 
do lour 
donor 

Gar lant 
ab stract 
an nsAs 
bar rack 
dastard 

fran dam 
aggard 
hang man 
bar as^ 
ras cal 
eapstto 
pas chal * 
sal ad 
scandal 

stated ard 
stag nant 
ballast 
pal ace 
toads^i 



JDVEMICE snsixmG-Booff. 

Fru'gal, 
hu man 
usance . 
nui Banco 
Lu cent . 
stu dent 
use k^ss 
fluent 
Cu bic 



iuHl 
lu cid 
fluid 
fu mid 
u nit 
hu mid 
pupil 
pu trid 
tulip 

Both the ftyUabks short 



vas sal 



pban tasmt haii quet 

chap let 
clar et 
trav etse 
dam ^el 
frag ment 
mal let 



ar rant 
bal ance 
bal lad 
carat 
man na 
pal ate 



ram part 
valadce 
atlas 
gram mar 
ran sack 
can vass 
phal anxt 
^nap sack 
ast^ ma 

Tal ent 

■>^— i ' I— — i— 



tan gent 



lamp black pam phletf 

chap el 
bar ren 
garret 
ab «ence 
ad verb 
ad verse 
casket 
crabbed 
match less 
chaji nel 



tumid 

du ring 
stu pid 
tu nic 
fii tile 
Tu mult 
lu ere 
neu ter 
suit or . 

harsh ne3^ 
pal ette 
as pect 
tram mel 
ab ject 
chal lenge 
An tic 
cap did . 
mal i<;e 
an Til 
an guish 
chal ice 
famine 
graph ic t 
pan lie 

snap pish 
par i^ 
van ish 
rap id 



r • 



•rrrvfBTT 



m^^^^m 



^OT 



AMERICAN aCBOGL CI.A8S-B00K, NO. I. 83 



tec/ tics 
mas sive 
fa" cile 
a" cid 
ma'' gic 
ta" cit 
pla'cid 
fra^'gile 
a"gilc 
tra" gic 

lav ish -J 
prac-tice 
spar in 
cabin 
vai id 
ban dit 
ban ish 
blan dish 
stat ics 
cav il 
rapid 
cap tive 
sat in 
sap ling 
Ian guish 
blac^ ish 
scant ling 
radish 



jasmine 

Eas sive 
ran dish 
frantic 
sam phire* 
fran chi^e 
ax is 
land ing 
bap t]3t 
tran quil 
san guine 
last mg 
ham string 
rap ine 
hang i6g 
lat in 
ad dice 
af fix 
chaffinch 
bap ti^m 
clas sic 
fam ish 
hab it 
max im 
traffic 
fab ric 
tran sit 
bar ifig 
s av age 



sal rage 
band age^ 
rav age 
bag gage 
fen guage 
dam agcf 
manage 
mar rii^ge 
car riage 
plantain 
cap tain 
chap lain 
pan el 
planet 
pack et 
jack et 
mat tress 
bar rel 
Ian cet 
can oel 
satch el 
hatch et 
latch et 
Gam ut 
tank ard 
mad am 
jal ap 
pa" geant 
scab bard 



catsup 
can cer 
crack ers 
dab bier 
fiat ter 

gaTHCr 
ammer 
lat ter 
pam per 
plan ter 
raTH er 
scam per 
shat ter 
slander 
slat tern 
smat ter 
spat ter 
tan ner 
pan ther 
cank er 
ram mer 
dag ger 
cav em 
pat tern 
ram bier . 
banker 
stag ger 
tap ster 
sad dler 



/,* 



*firwf 



JUVKNILE 8PXLLIN6*B00K, 



mammoth seraph* 



H 

ehan' dler )gam mon {prel ate 

tavern 

icfit ter 

Ian tern 

tarn p^r 

fial Ver 

hanker 

cam phire* 

dan draff 

hav oc 

€^p tor 

wagonf 

tal on 



patch work fash ion 



ran som 
as tcfr 
8a^ on 4 
atom 
an chprj • 
bar on ^ 
fac tor 
hane/ some 
act or 
mammon 
ran dom 



sex tant 
^eh ate 
ter race 
er rand 
en trance 
ex tant 
ped ab 
ped ant 
pen ance 
cen tral 
pen man 
vestal 



rev el 

fen nel 
leav en 
em blem 
fer vent 
firm liess 
es sence 
zeph yr^ 
clem eht 
earthen 
ores cent 
per feet 
- reb el 



icaffold 
•afiron 
can non 
ballot 
gallop 
fram b«l 
phan torn * 
bam mock 
gal lows 
car rot 
carol 
can ton 
drag on 
fiiTH bm 
flagon 



ad junct 
bank rupt 
grand ear 
am bushjl 
val our 
clan gour 
clam our 
ran cour 
languor 
cal lous 
can dour 
Ten ant 
vernal 
rem nant 
Iden na 



Wed lock 
cen sor 
neck cloth 
fet lock 
ec logue 
epocnj 



sen tence 
ven geancejser pent 



segment 
tem pest 
ten et 
wretch ed 
Pen cil 
den tist 



breast knot des tine 



•?»■ 



t«rPH#«' 



Hel m«».t 
fresh et 
em press 
bless ed 
brcTH ren 
earn est 
el dest 



bed ding 
en gihe 
merit 
me^ lin 
nestling 
pen sive 
peril 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOO^ NO. I. tS 



pei'feh 
plev in 
rel ict 
rel ish 
ser vtle 
sex tile 
ster il 
ten dril 
tep id 
verdict 
wed ding 
^'^3 tigfe 
ep ic • 
fes live 
blem ish 
eth fcs 
swell ing 
fet id 
cher ish 
fer vid "^ 
flex lie 
hermitl 
rel lb 
pet tish , 
p^nd iiig 
rep61e 
spher ic * 
re* in 
siheiv ing 



Bcep tre 
sher iff 
sel vage 
en trails 
ferret 
ker nel 
tress ,e* 
Tel vet 
ves sel 
vir gin 
cir cuit 
whirl wind 
skir mish 
jfir kin 
fsquir rel 
ilet tuce ■ 
;Cher ub 
ped lar 
nee tai** 
leop ard 
her aid , 
eel lar 
vellum 
clev er 
el der 
cen ser 
fender 
fes ter 
fet ter* 



let ter 
mer celr 
nev er 
pes ter 
ren der 
shel ter 
sever . 
slen der 
tempt er 
tender 
trench er 
wel ter 
mem ber 
en^ ber* 

en d^r 

lelp er 
jest er 
cen tre 
weaTH & 
west em 
whexH er 
heifer 
leaxH er 
cher up 
hec tor 
ven om 
weap on 
welcome 
de6t or 



fel on' ' 
her on 
zeal ot ^ 
Srefc tot V 
sec ond 
ten don 
sex ton 
irk some 
cir CUB 
er rour 
fer vour 
zeatl 0U8 
splen douti 
jeedioui 
ter rour 
Distant 
di*nral 
filbcal 
inland 
flippant 
pick axe 
in stance 
crys tal 
Christ mafif ^ 
witehcnl^ 
in dex 
tin sd 
instep 
"vi^tneiBi . 



m^ 



"T"^ 






t*«1b 



66 



/UVENTILE STBIXING-QPOK. 




drgit 

six pence {1^1" gid 
^inquest 



in cense 

Sib lets 
lick set 
eys tern 
Lim pid 

bid ding 
liv ing 
drip ping 
ok rine 
ekip ping 
will ing 
crit ic 
mim ic 
bis cuit 
,fish ing _ 

piggint* 
ft^rim 
iitting 
skit tish 
think ii:£g 
middling 
dis trict 
win ning 
shipping 
brici^ kihi 



vi^gii 

ri'Vgid 
6i"'gil 
ii" quid 
liv id. 
lim it . 
civil 
tim id 
vi^ it 
vw id 
civ ic . 
dim ish 
mys tic 
cyn ic 
spirit 
vie tim 
in stinct . 
guild ing 
phthis ic 
pris tine 
mis sile 
phy^y ic * 
chym ist t 
cricket 
mis tress 
mit tens 
trin ket 



chif el 
linnet 
riv et , 
fil let 
bil let 
tip pet 
bris ket 
rick etat 
min «trel 
skil let . 

mm ute 
min um 
worn en 
spin age 
mi a tage 

pil lage 
vil lage ' 
vin tage 
vi^ age 
im age 
tillage 
crib bage 
villain 
Ist^ mus 
wizard 
niggard 
li2 ard . 

chris tiaht 
fritter 



•jkMl 



■i*4lMM 



t«ki«»k« 



TtSit 



filbert' 
linger 
nip perf 
phil ter * 
sis ter 
skip per 
slip per 
splin t^r 
tin der 
tink er 
sim mer 
hinder i 
shiv er 
blis-ter 
pin cer» 
cist ern 
twit ter , 
hiTH €fr 
gild er 
rig-gert 
fish er 
cin der 
wHth er 
whis per 
gin ger • 
gtimmer 
pitcher 
in suit 
bigot 



\ 



X 



X 



WW 'V 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOGX; N0<^ 1. IS7 



bish' op 

pi¥ Ot 

pis tol 
citron 
li" qiioT 
mir ror 
wi^ dom 

income 
kingdom 

Hng worm 

Ei" geon 
JB sop . 

sjm bol 
synod 
sjrmp torn 
im pulse 
scirrhus 
gib botis 
rigour . 
vig our 
Com m& 
Compact 
contact 
pros trate 
solace 
bonder man 
potash 



con tract 
d(^ma 
moral 
poplar 
war rant 
watch man 
Ob ject 
mod el 
sol vent 
son net 
tor rent 
col lect 
con cert 
con greds 
solemn 
pro^ cess 
col lege 
forest 
spot less 
com merpe 
com pend 
«|com ment 
fond ness 
con quest 
qon test 
edn Tent 
con verse 



itnotrl edge prof it 
on se^t sol id 



proe: f CSS 
prophet* 
waliet 
Bodkin 
coffin 
com ic 
con vict 
4oric 
soph ist * 
for eifn 
want ing 
op tics ^ 
doc tHne 
office 
con script 
con flict 
nos tril 
offspring 
OS tncb 
fos sil 
hos tile 
dd^ile 

B)rov ince 
bnd ling 
noggin 
lo gic 
tropic 



polish 
novice 
flor id 
torrid "" 
gos sip 
clos et 

sor rd 
mod est 
lock e%^ 
rock et 
sock et 
Com plot 
con sort 
prol i>g(iB 
ob long 
Prod uct 
schol ar 
monarch 
collar 
squan det 
wan der 
nos truiQ 
fod der 
otter 
pot ter 
rob ber . 
yon der > 
prov erl^ 

H2!L£2L. 



i 



■*'' 



•|i^«* 



men' ster 
chol ei* * 
sol der * 
Aost ler 
con quer 
prompt er 
mod ern 
cob bier 
coix ml 



JUVKNILE SPELLfNG-BOOK. 



bur gess 
bufment 
cur reiit 
fun liiel 
fill gent 
bun dred 
Subject^ 
tur ret 
buffet 
phos phortHudg ment| 



com ment 
wan tori 
veatchword 
col umfi 
non ))Ius 
Aoii oiir 
pom pous 
Cut la8s(^ 
sub stsince 
surface 
sfaurcfa man 



pun gent ' 
trum pet 
cud gel 
buck et' 
woht ed * 
cov ert ^ 
coup let 
Furlong* 
bur dock 
blood &hot 
Bus kin 



bum ing 
cul prit 
cun nJrig 
fur nish 
JUS tice 
lus tring 
fui* nish 
pub lish 
punf ice 
sum mit 
mul lein 
sur feit 
churl isb 
sub tile 
flour ish 



drug gel 
rug ged 
rim n^t* 
rund let 
mus ket 
Frus tuta 
mus tard 
buck ram 
vul gai: 
jour na! 
slug gard 
drunk ar«r 
buz zard, 
com pass 
sur plus 



ifiuslr ckt Iduc titeft' 
pur chase ifiir nish 
sul tan' Islut tish 

• 

com bat jsjiur plice 
work man cut tii^ 
f ough^aptf drug gj^ 
Nut meg duck ling 
bil9 get rub bii^ ' 



some tihinghunrger 

lov ihg 

nourish 

suf frage 

um bi;*^ge 

co^r age 

toA age * 

rom ago 

pup pet 

pommel 

moii grel 

sud den 

but tress 

plummet 



mus ter 
but ter 
gut ter . 
lus tre * 
mut ter 
sutl^ 
ul cer 
ush er. 
lumber' 
buck ler 
bum pet 
butle? 
pur.ser 



•Awth 



\tk,^tBt 



l« 



^^ 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. L 6^ 



rud.der 

• 

shud der 
snuf few 
shut ter 
turn bier 

Ad' age 
pan eake 
rate bane 
pnff way 
land scape 
man date 
nar Tate 
stag nate 
back stajs 
Slant 4rise' 
back bite 
vac ciibe 
man like 
pastinie 
[uag mire 
Ihad ow 
ar row 
sack etoth 
harrow 
tmns pprt 
shallow 
tallbw 



sul phur * 
stub bom 
summcHi^ 
sculp tor 
sue cour 
cum brous 



com fort 
won drous 
col ouf 
blus trous 
sur 'geon 
blud geon 



lunch eon 
dun geon 
gud geon . 
punch eon 
trunch eoit 
nunch iati - 



The first short, the second lobg^* 

fal low 
narrow* 
pass port 
flam bea:u 
sal low 
Stat ute 
stat Me 
rapt ure 
pftst ure 
capture 
stat are' 
val ue / 
fract ure 
Tell tale 



yel loyt 
bel low 
el bow 
mel low 
mead ow 
felloe ^ 
head achef threfeh old 



menace . 
es say 
mess inate 
mes suage 
pres sige 
lies tate 



thread bdre scbed lile 



breast platelvent ure 
imer maid gest ure 



Em pire 
jpen ^ife 
ex ile 
Fellow 
whet stone 



bed clothes press ure 



ech 6 1 .- 
!!en6 uite 
lect ure 
nephew* 
ref u^e 
res cue 



flex ure 
vest ure 
virt ue 
verd ure 
prel ude 



per jure 
trea^ ure " 
del uge 
pleasure 
Nick name 
Shipt£?rigAt 
quick lime ' 
in Bight 
mid highi 
Tip toe 
in road 
whit leW 
in most 
pil low* 



fiisit 



|cbWlb 



•^"f^W 



^T 



vo 

wid' ow 
impost 
ifiniiow 

frimro^ 
il low 
^low 
bxim stone 
Fig urie 
tribqtip 
issq^ 
strict lire 
pict lire 
fixt are 
mixture 



JUVENItB ePELLlNG-DOtoK. 



scrip tore 
fis sure 

For age 
host age 
bondage 
Sponfree 
fron tier 
col league 
Con trite 
ofttime^ 
bon fire 
Hoi low 
borrow 



morrow 
sor row 
wal low 
mot to' 
also* 
quar to 
grotto 
sw^ low 
follow 
coa course 
Surname 
flood gate 
bt^bear 
fi*UB trate 



E 



SunriM 
sun shine 
tim pire / 
Turhooat 
for row 
ur port 
urrow 
Vol ume 
non suit 
post ure 
Vulture 
junct ure 
cult ure 
punct ure 



The first qrUable short, Uw ToweLof the Mcond icfffc«ly pei3ceptibl«i| 



CrijDi' son 
dhin glef 
min gle 
chris ten t 
«crib b]e . 
drjyel 

Suick en 
rib ble 
brindle 
quib ble 



I 



dim pie 
im pie 
d den 
brit tie 
Turtle 
sup pie 
sub tie 
stum ble 
smug gle 
slov en 



dozen 
cousin 
rum ble 
ruffle 
puz zle 
muzzle 
mut ton 
but ton 
mus cle 
jmuf fle 



c 



tumble 
jus tie 

ud die 
tumble 
fum ble 
bustle 
bi^r THen 
bur den 
pur fle 



The fint 1oq(;^ th« leooiid the middle found. 



Care' fill [child hood 
Mind fid li^At foot 
guile fol jfing^fol 



Tight ful 
pite fill 
dire fill 



Wo fill 
dole foi 
h(^fiil 



tiktt*. 



'¥ ' 



AMERICAN SCHOOL class-book, NO. L 
The first the middle sound, the second short. 



71 



Pars' nip 
car nage 
arc tic 
mar quis 
artist 



Na' vy * 
va ry 
ha zj 
ha sty 
sha dy 
era 2rj 

Bad'ly* 

fan cy 
ban dy 
pan try 
shah by 
bran dy 
glad ly 
scanty 
Lev ee 
ma^'ny 
a^ny 



cary mg 
jauB dice 
tar nish 
gar lie . 
mar gin 

Both tile syllables Ipng 

scaly 
Fee bly 



Har bour 
ar bout* 
dark some 
cha/ dron \ 
bar ber 



flee cy 
Icy 
ri my 
wily 



mi ry 
briny 
fri day 
slyly 
Tory 
ro sj 



bar ter 
part ner 
mar tyr 
farmer 
[garner 

sto ry 
tfo phy f 
Pu ny 
fumy 
fury 
jury 



The first syllable short, the second long^. 



eddy 
dcrgr 



jfer ry 
gen try 
gent ly 
jelly 
ker sey 
pet ty 
sen try 
ves trV' 
wheriy 
twen ty. 
earth ly 
heal thy 
Pigmy 
b;?8kly 



Ichim ney 
ferist ly 
Coffee 
drop sy 
boggy 

80C key 
obby 
lj[iop py 
proxy 
"vol ley 
jClum sy 
jWor THy 
Wen day 



lovely 
come ly 
trus ty 
dus ty 
luc ky 
jthur* day 
iiiur ky 
(pius ky 
Sunday 
stUr dy 
sur ly ' 
cur ly *• 
rud dy 
scur vy 



Ji**' 



-0€: 



»«lC 



72 

« 

ra rare 
^turef 
&il lirf 
way lay 
▼a cate 
4ay break 
staor case 
isuLin'^ail 
l)ay time 
daylight • 
May pole 
nun bow ^ 
whalebone 
hail stone 
where fore 



JUYEmx^ SPELLING-BOOK. 
Both tlie sjllables long. 

errayestonelsea coast Jfi nite 



Fe male 

Le vite 

sea fight ifeat ure 

Nine teen 

Fire stone 

fly blow 

mne fold ' 

tiind most 



steam boat twi light 
Great ure 



irajst coat 



• > 



sign post 
bUnd fold 
side board 
lime stone 
mile stone 
tyrp 
eye sore 
Ne gro 



mi gr^te 
scare c^wjthree score Fire side 



three fold' 



lei^ ure 
seiz ure 
Leap year 
field piece 
Sea breeze 
J^^ey hole 
Li brate 
vi brate 
cli mate 
side way^ 
night mare 



life time 
sky light 
eye sjght 
Mo hair 
por trait 
no»e gay 
post date 
Four teen, 
oat meal 
Fore sightf 
Port hole 
Solo 
four fold 
bride maidlfour score 



like wi^e 



cocoa * 
Curite 
Pqcw do 



Bale>l 
1>aneiiil 
feitliH 



Tho lint long^ the.second tbio m^e sound. 



bare foot [hate fill 



shame fill 
grate iul 



pain ful 
i^asteful 



Ne^d ful 
heed ful 
peace fql 



The first long', Dirtcoond bvoad. 

T^iram'oi) iVid Goiiht f iEye brow jLig&dious 

71^ first broad, the second Ion;, 

P^' age iMoist ure [joint ure jHousehold 



}mi^04k^ 



mm 



>■«<■ 



^taN*» ^ 



■>■»!» 



ni 



■ W ^i* 



.^.'^.tolA. 



• 1 » I ^ • .1 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, N,0. I, ^3< 

The broflul souad of the vowels and diphthongs, s- 
The socond syllable short* 



Au'giist 
an burn .. 
saw yer 
quar ter 
bol^ der 
gpr geoQs 
lor mer . 
pau per 
au thor 
bal sam . 
awk ward ^ 

Wap^Cire 
cawe way 
mor/ gage 



tor por. 
mor tar 



slat^/i ter fcord a^e " 

dau phin * 
hor net 
aus pice 
aw ftil t 
lawful 
Mor tal 
quad raiit 
or phan * 



Warming 
for f(pit 
sordid 
cor nice 
dawn ing 
sausage 
mor tise 
awn ing 



mor sel 
tojp toi^c 



The second syilable long. 



Law suit 



Ward robe horn pipe 

foiit night 



broad 9word 



Broad side 



ord nance 
Royal 

8oi|f jiaot 
loist en 
point ed 
oy less 
loi den^ 
Joy ous 
noi some 
toil some' 
point er 

Tort ure 
fort une 
Or g»e* 



Th^middle sound of the vowels an4diBl^thoQg8. 
^ The iecond syllable short. 



Wool' len 
rude ness 



charlger 
arch er 



movementaibiond 



fruit less 
Truant 
bru tal 
Ar mour 
cjiarm er 
carv er 
charter 
T — 



Wood land Ar eent 



Foot inK 
crook ed 
pud ding 
boor ish 
mov ing 
ptov ing 



brew ing 
pul pit 
bush el 



ar dent . 
daunt less 
heart felt 
heark en 
Sar ca^m 
ser geant 



Dar ling 
armin«, 
gar nish 
argil 
carping 
Cool er 
bo^om 
bull ion;| 
cush toh 
Pru dent 



•^^-•R 

»« 



|9,Siyl.aiMMB* 



liiif* 



74 JUVENILE SPELLING7BOOIL 

»Progre98ivc. 

Keep at a distance from all bad bojs. 

A good child will not cheat in play. 
, All good men love virtue, and hate vice. 

You are most happy when yoti are good. 

The path of duty is the path of peace. ' 

Do to others as you wish them to do to yoik 
. Try to aid all those who are in distress. 

Our parents have done much for us. 
^ We sljiould be grateful to our parents. 

We love praise, but seldom deserve it* 

Strive to be good, rather than great. 

Avoid being wise in thine owh conceit. 

See yourself as other people see you. 

Attend to the advice of the wise and good. 

They who seek wisdom will surely find her. . 

He who loves vice will be brought to shanw. 

A loud laugh alwiiys shows a vacant mind. 

He cannot go wrong whom virtue guides* 

Virtue is more pleasant than any vice can be^ > 

The less a person sleeps, the tnore he lives. . 

We shall regret ill<spent days thari; are past. 

Life is half d^nt before we learn how to live. . 

It is a blessing to hi^e good and pious parents. 

He who serves God ift the only truly wisd. 

We should always obey our parents' requests. 

Never sell your virtue, to purchase weaKh. 

Our ppvate deeds, if noble> are our noUest deeds. 
' TSn person is wise, or safe, but he that is honest. . 

Winter quickly passes, and springresumes her reigiu 

Budk the spring of humw life^ alas 2 knowa no tttmm 



> • 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. L 75 

THE LAMBS* 

It is very coId-r-Aad how high 6ie wind is^ There i^ 
a tree Uowa down. What has that man in his arma ? It 
is a yoiuig lamb. Poor thing ! how it bleats I It wants 
its mother-— it is crying for her, I wish she could heai* 
it : but she cs^not hear.; she is dead.' 

Pray^ shepherd, take care of di» little lamb, and give 

I golKl new milk to drink, and keep it warm ; aikl when 

it can take care of itself, and the weather is pleasant, let 

it fl|Kirt and frisk about in the fields, and be very merry- 

THE PARTRIDGE. 

Hark ! there is a gun let off; and a bird has dropped 
down, just at our feet. It is all bloody ! Its win^ i? 
broken. It cannot fly any further. Poor thing \ How it 
butters ! It is going to die. Now it does not stir. It is 
quite dead. 

What bird is it ? It is a partridge. There is Si man 
witli a gun in. his hand. He is coming to get the par- 
tridge. Now he has let off his gun figain. He has shot 
a very pretty bird indeed. It has recT, and greeny and 
purpte feathers. What bird is it P It .is a pheasant. 

THE ORCHARD. 

Let us go io the orchard. The apples are ripe. We 
must gather them. Fetch the .basket. There is a man 
in that tree. He will gath^ all the apples that grow on 
these hij^ branches. Do not climb up the ladder. Gather 
the allies th^t aris on the grou^. 



76 JUVflNILE SPELLING-BOOK. 

Look at those poor little «^rls standing at the gate. 
They want to come in. They want some apples. Their 
.fathers and mothers have no fields, nor orchards^ nor 
gardens. Po<^ little girls i shall wte ^ve them some 
apples ? Yes ; til that basket wilii fine ripe applet and 
give them to the little girls. '* 

O9 now they are glad. . How kindly they thank us. 
They are cone home; Perhaps they will ^ve some of 
their apj^es to their fathers and molher^^ and little bro- 
thers and sisters. . , 

* 

BOYS LOOKING FOR BIRDS' NEST9. 

What are these boys looking for in the hedges, and 
among the bushes P Little boys, what do you want ? We 
are looking for birds' nests. We want some eggs, and 
ibme young birds. But why should you take the eggs, 
and the young birds ? They will do you no good r and 
the old birds, who have taken so much pains to build 
their nests, will be very sorry indeed to lose their eggs 
and their young ones. 

Little hoys, if you find any nests, do not rob the poor 
birds of their eggs, or their young ones. You may look 
at th« little birds in their nests, but do not frighten 
thera-^do not hurt them — do not take them away fix>ro 
their kind parents, and from their soft, clean, warm 
nests. 

You would not like that ajny body should take yoa 
from your fathers and motliers, and yow own homes, 
and keep you always shut up, quite alone, in a very small 
place, and feed you in a very strange way, and almost 
atarve you to death. 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. I. 77 
The aceent 9a the secbod syllable. 



A base' 
allay 
cas cade 
a vail 
as sail 
af fair 
as suage 
A gree 
ap peal 
ap,pear 
a greed 
ad here 
ar rear 
ac ce-de 
ap peaye 
cha grin * 



The first short, the second Img. ^ 



as 8]fi:n 
all/ 
a wry 
as size 
ap prize 
a scribe 
at tire 
ma lign 
aside 
tran scribe 
Pa role 
ca jole 
a float 
pa trol 
A cute 
as sure 



bias pfaeme sa lute 



gran dee 
an tique 
fa tigue 
a chieve 
ca price 
gan grene 
ca reer 
ar riere 
Ca nine 
cal cine 



ma ture 
as sume 
trans fu^e 
tran^ mute 
Per vade 
em pale 
en slave 
en tail 
en rage 
Ex ceed 



ex treme 
en treat 
en feofF 
en dear 
Ex cite 
en tice 
ex ile 
ex pire 
en shrine 
Ex plore 
ex port 
ex po^e 
en force 
en gross 
en c]6se 
ex plode 
en robe 
en croach 
En dure 
en sue 
en sure 
ex elude 
e:i^cu^ 
ex pu^n 

{>er fume 
nvade 
dis play 



dis place ' 
dis suade 
in sane 
di^ dain 
In deed 
di^.ea^e ' 
intrigue 
'in crease 
In vite 
in cite 
in cline 
in spire 
dis like 
mis guide * 
in scribe 
Dis clo^e 
dis po^e 
di^ robe 
im po^e 
dis course? 

with hold 
In ure 
mis uie 
im pui'e 
im Due 
inhume 
dis pute 



78 

im pute* 
in elude 
clif (use 
induce 
Con nat6 
com plain ^ 
ob tain 
con vey 
con tain 
com pare 
stoc ade 
block ade 
con strain 
Com plete 
congeal 
^con ceal 
com peer 

Abash' 
adapt 
alas 
aslant 
ad vance 
at tach , 
attract 
ca bal 
ca nal 
era vat ' 
gal lant 



JUVEN^LB SPIXLING»BOOK. 



con i^eit 
ob scene 
con ceive 
convene 
Con fine 
com ply 
con dign 
[con cise 
con niVe 
con spire 
con sign 
com bine 
com pile 
Con dole 
ron deau 
cor rode 
com mode 



op po^e 
en core 
con sole 
con trol 
com po^ 
Con duee 
con elude 
com pute 
con sume 
con fa^e 
pol lute 
ob tuse 
Up braid 
un safe 
un veil 
un laid 
sur vey 



Bbth the syllables short. 



at tack 
amass 
rat an 
trans act 
bar angtie 
a gAast 
Abet 
at test 
a stern 
a venge 
caidet 



ga zette 
tTBxb fer 
trans gress 
ad ept 
a lert 
al lege 
arrest 
as cend 
as sent 
Addict 
acquit 



sus^afin 
un pmd 
Unseen 
sue ceed 
unseal 
sublime 
suffice * 
sub side 
survive 
un bind 
unwise 
sub scribe 
Up hold 
un sold 
un load 
Un sure 
pur sue 

a bys8| 
ad miiL 
a4>ridge 
afflilbt 
a midst 
qua drilk . 
Anon ' 
ac cost 
adopt 
a gone 
atoft 



I 



*cwii 



AltfERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. I. 79 



Ad just' 
ab rupt 
a didt 
an nul 
En hance 
en bamp 
en act 
en trap 
expand 
ex act 
en chant 
Ex tend 
ex t6nt 
ex pect 
En list 
ex tinct 
ex ist 
Ex ult 
Im plant 
lin ance 
in graft 

Tre pan' 
e lap^ 
di van 
De feet 
ce ment 
be head 
fi nesse 



. 



Dis sent 
im merse 
im mense 
im merge 
im pel 
im pend 
im press 
in Cense 
in ei^t 
in feet 
in fer 
in fest 
ill firm 
in sert 
in rent 
in ter 
in verse 
mis pend 
dis pel 
mis spent 
in tense 



Dis miss 
in sist 
dis til 
dis tinct 
im print 
in fringe 
in flict 
In cog 
in volve 
dis lodge 
In cur . 
di^ gust 
dis trust 
in gulph * 
mis trust 
mis judge 
Con ncx 
of fend 
con firm 
ob test 
ob ^erve 



The first long^ the second short. 



re pent 
re dress 
be friend 
de fer 
di rect 
di verge 
di vest 



pre tence 
e lect 
e merge 
pre tend 
pre serve 
re cess 
re *erve 



con temn 
con dense 
con fer 
con demn 
con verge 
op press 
com press 
com mence 
com mend 
cor rect 
Con duct 
con struct 
con vulse 
oc cult 
Sup plant 
sur pass 
bom bast 
Sub vert 
sue cess 
bur lesque 
sub ject 

re vert 
re press 
re search 
Re pulse 
di vulge 
re iouch 
Pro tract 



U 



^Iftmt 



80. 

'mo rass' 
Pro pel 
*pro pend 

E vade' 
-re trace* 
be tray 
de claim 
de range 
de fray 
gri mace 
Be ware 
re gain 
e scape 
re pair 
re main 
de spair 
re straint 
bri gade 
be wail 
chi cane * 
de face ' 
pre vail 
re gale 
re place 
e strange 
re tain 
de batie 
re claim 



JUVENILE SPELLING-BOOK. 

fore tell Igro tesque 
pro ject O mit 
CO quette pro lix 

Both the syllables long;. 



jse ilate 
e rase 
Secrete 
re cede 
se vere 
de crease 
be reave 
de nlean 
re^peal 
re lease 
re deem 
de fe?it 
re prieve 
re ceipt 
re yere 
de gree 
de cease 
re licve 
re plete 
re treat 
re trieve ' 
be seech 
be queaTH 
be speak 
Re fine 



...'» -■' 



re cite 
re ly 
de cide 
beni^ 
despite 
be guile 
de scribe 
de ride 
de rive *^ 
pre cise 
di vine 
re vi^e 
de fine 
de my 
de fy 
e squire 
be hind 
pre scribe 
re ply ^ 
de spite 
re spire 
re ^i^n ' 
re chne 
espy 
pre mi^e 



Pro long 
Pro mulge 
Su perb 

« 

de Vise , 
re 5ide 
de file 
re quite 
de scry 
be nignt 
re tire 
re vile 
re vive 
be tide 
pre ^ide 
repine 
Su pine 
De duce 
de mure 
e lude 
re buke 
re cluse 
re duce 
re fiite 
re new 
re sume 
re view 
se cure 
pe ru^e 



..4£ta 



*8h«s A. 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. h 81 



be deW 
de pute 
dilute ' 
se duce 
de iude 
refuse 
pre elude 
pre smae 
E lope 
de po^e 
re port 



re voke 
re mdte 
de port 
de plore 
de note 
re proach 
re course 
be moan 
di vorce 
Pro fane 
o bey 



bro cade 
post haste 
por tray 
Co here - 
bohea 
po lice 
prafile 
pro ceed 
Pro scribe 
pro vide 
o blige 



Fore clo^ 
fore bode 
fore know 
post pone 
pro rogue 
pro vost * 
Pro duce 
pro cure . 
pro fuse 
pro trude 
Su preme 



The broad sound of the Towels and diphthongs. 
The first syllable short. * 



Ac cord' 
a vaunt 
ab sorb 
as sort 
jack daw 
as sault 
trans 'form 



Ac count 
a mount 
a stound 
a vow 
a bout 
a ground 
ca rou5:e 



a vouch 
IJn bound 
Ac cloy 
ac coil 
adjoin 
cham ois t 
^ droit 



En dorse 
es cort , 
ex alt 
ex haust 
Inthrail 
di* gorge 
in stall 



The Biiddle sonnd of the vowels and diphtbangi. 
The first syllable short. 



Afai^ 
ca tSLtrh 
jpapa 
mam ma 
Guit ar 
im part 
discbarge 



Pla toon 
lam poon 
ac crue 
ra gou^ 
gam boge 
ca noe 
bas soon 



a lodf 
a do 
a mour 
bam boo 
car touch J 
bar poon ^ 
Mon soon 



pol tron 
bon ton 
Mb took 
mis rule 
Un moor 
uh couth 
sur tout 






fcbaiih. 



} a, 1 iyrL M a tar. 



"T^ 



82 JUVENILE SPELLING-BOOK. 

TIIE SEASONS. 

It 16 winter now, cold winter. It snow»— How fast 
it snows! We cannot see the grass, nor the gravel 
w&lk, nor the road ; they are covered with snow. 

When the sun shines/and the weather is warmer, the 
snow will melt ; and it will sink into the earth as the rain 
does. When the winter is quite oiper^ spring will come 
again. O, spring is very pleasant! There will be lilies 
and violets, and a great manj pretty flowers ; theire wiH. 
be blossoms and green leaves upon the treies. The birds 
will sing sweetly, and they will be very busy picking up 
bits of hay, moss, and wool, to build. their nests. 

The days will be longer than they are in winter, and 
the weather wiH be warmer. When spring is over, it 
will be summer. Then the weather is hot, and the 
. days are long. There will be hay-time atnd harvest, and 
. thunder and lightning. The fruit will be ripe— cherries, 
currants, peaches, and plums, and a great many other 
kinds of fruit; and there will be moiss-roseS'that smeQ 
so^weet, and fine pinks. 

W^hen summer is over, the days will become short : 
there will be very few flowers left in the fields and in 
the gardens ; the leaves on th^ trees will begin to fade^ 
and JTall ofll 

The weather will be cold, and there will be thick fogs* 
^ut it will not be winter, as soon as sumiAer is over. , 
Ko — it will be autumn. Then' apples and pears, filberts 
vand walnuts, will be ripe. When autilmli is over, win- 
ter, cold winter, will^ome again, and frost, and ice, and 
snow, and short dark days, and long nights. Spring, Sum> 
mer, Aut)imn; and Winter, are called seasons. 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. L 83 

»- There is scarcely any thing (says Mr. Walker) which dia- 
tinguishcs a person of meaa from good eOacation, more than the pro- 
nunciation (rf the unaccented rowels. 

Vowels under the aiccent are pronounced nearly alike 6y the learn- * 
cd ^d the unlearned ; but the unaccented vowels in the mouths of 
the former have a distinct, open, specific sound, while the latter often 
nnk or change fhem into some other sound. Those,, therefore, who 
would pronounce eleganUy, must be particularly attentive to. the 
unaccented words ; as a neat pronunciation of them, forms one Of 
the greatest beauties of speaking. 

Words of {Lree syllables, with the accent on the first, 
The first syllable short, (he others long. ' 



Ad' e quate 
as pe rate 
ag gre gate 
iap pe tite ^ 
ar che type ^ 
cat e chise 
Bxi te lope 
av e nue 
bar l^e cue t 
del e gate 
el e vate 
ex e crate 



Had' i cate 
cas/ti gate 
al li gate 
pal pi tate 
fab ri G^^ 
nav i gate . 



rec re ate 
ren e gade 
des pe rate 
dep re cate 
} ser e nade 
ve" ge tate 
pen e trate 
per pe trate 
eel e brate 
ex pc; dite 
er e mite 
tel e scope 

i, y, second syllable as e. 



pen te cost 
per se ctite, 
ex e cute 
im pre cate 
lin e age 
nau se atef • 
iau re ate 
pros e lyte || 
con se crate 
con gre gate 
pros e cute 
fur be low . 



jar bi trate * 
an i mate 
sal i vate 
ab di cate 
can di date 
pal li ate 



fas ci nate 
an ti quat^ 
a" gi tate 

macb in^te I 
phar i see % * 
mat ri cide 



^«, 1 IjL M in /«r. ^ t ^ *)^' ^««4« 



J cb a» k. 

112, 



fl 9, 1 tjl. u is DOU 



84 



JUVENttE SPELLING-BOOK 



frat' ri cide 
.sac ri fice * 
an ti type 
par ri cide 
man i fold 
cal ieo 
inar i gold 
an ti pope 
an ti dote 
ar ti choke t 
lat i tude 
sane ti tude 
tnag ni tude 
hab i tude 
las si tude 
al ti tilde 
am pli tude 
at tri bute 
grat i tude 
gar ni ture t 
ap ti tude 
ven ti late 
ter mi nate 
ger mi nate 
pred i cate 
be^ i tate 
med 1 tate 
ded i cate 
4^9 ti nate 



^el i cate 
em i grate 
es ti mate 
e" qui page 
ex pi ate 
her i tage 
pen ny weight 
ped i gree 
re" ci pe 
ver digris 



im i tate 
in di cate 
in tri cate 
ir ri tate 
in sti gate 
in ti mate 
sim 1 le 
crit i ci^ 
iti di fi^o 
mm la ture 



hem i sphere J ob sti nate 



re" gi cide 
ver ti go 
ep i sode 
em bry o 
ret i nue 
re^ i due 
ep i cure 
des ti tute 
rec ti tude 
ser vi tude 
plen i tude 
mit i gate 
vi" ti ate 
lit i gate 
dis si pate 
vin di cate 
trip li cate. 
li*^ qui date 



I 



t«wJBi«w 



iphMf 



ob li gate 
nom i nate 
horn i cide 
pbr ti CO II 
con sti tute 
sol i tude 
Ion gi tude 
promp ti tude 
tor pi tude || 
for ti tude 
in sti tute 
rid i cule 
cul ti vate 
sup pli cate 
tur pi tude 
sub sti tute 
mul ti tude 
fur ni ture 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, XO. I. 85 
o, second syl&blc, as ^ no. 



Ad' vo cate 
ab ro gate 
ar ro gate . 
ap o gee 
at mo sphere 
pat ro ni^e 
an o dyne 
pan to mime 
ag o nize 
rep ro bate 
pet ro grade 



des q late 
dec o rate 
ren o vate 
der o gate 
per fo rate 
tern po rize 
meth o dize 
in no vate 
in so late 
pil tot^ case 
im mo late 



dis lo cate 
syl lo gize 
dis so lute 

• 

re* o lute 
ob so lete 
col o nize 
choc o late 
com pro mi^ 
au tho rize t 
sur ro gate 
suf fo cate 



Ca!' cu late 
act u ate 
am pu tate 
ac cu rate 
mac u late 
graduate 
pam tu rage 
grat u late 
reg u late 



u, second syllable, as in mute. 



em u late 
pec u late 
e4 u cate 
cir cu late 
er u dite 
dep u tize 
sit u ate 
in su late 
stip u late 



stim u late 
mod u late 
pop u late 
con ju gate 
ob du rate 
for tu nate \ 
por cu pine 
subjugate 
flue tmi|.te : 



The second syllable loog;^ the others sbortH; 



AT ge bra 
ar se nal \ 
fla ge let 
as te rbm 
<»t e chi^m H 
catechist . 



san he drim 
har Ic! quin 
a que duct 
flam m^ oug 
bach € lor 
em e raid 



el e gant 
rel e vant 
tel e graph * 
el e phant 
. el e gance 
ten e ment 



'|H»C. \\ 



4«r liyi bivtd. 



||ii»A'9l.MioAur. 



ir.«haftk. 



86 



JUVENILE 6PELLII*G.B00R 



pre" ce dent 
el e ment 
her e tic 
ve'' ge tive 
gen e sis 
ben e fit 
per e grine 
el e gist 
ex pie tive 
plen te ous 
em pe rour 
skel e ton 
lin e ai* 
lin e al 
in te gml 

Rad' i oal 
can ni foal 
cap i tai 
practical 
aQimal 
ad mi ral 
ma'' gi cal 
tra" gi cal 
dal li ance 
par. ti ^an t 
mar gi nal 
car di nal 
car,ni val ' 



Imis ere ant 
in 'ere ment 
syn the sis 
im pe tus . 
hid e ous 
pit e ous 
in te ger 
vin e gar 
ring lead er 
mis chie vous 
nau se ous * 
ofo se quie^ 
sol e ci^m 
non de script 
ob e lisk 

i, jj second syllable as e. 

guar di an 
par lia ment 
ar mi stice 
car ti lage 
hardiness 
tar di n^ss 
ar chi tect J 
ar bi ter 
harp si chord X 
man i fest 
ac ci d^nt . 
hap pi ness 
ab sti nence 



Icon se quence 
com pe tence 
com pie ment 
com pe tent 
con se quent 
c^un te nance 
moun te bank 
boun te ous 
sus te nance 
cour te 5an 
jour ne^ man 
coy e nant 
sub se quent 
cov e tons 
cour te ous ^ 






ta»lVLHM, 



gj^st li ness 
ac ci dence 
am bi ent 
tran si tive 
gal li dim 
sac ri lege 
a" qui line 
mar i time 
al ch|r mist | 
char 1 ot 
cham pi on 
az i muth 
car ri er 



AlttEklCAN SCHOOL CLASS- 



far' ri er 
barri er 
carri on 
hal cy on 
cal li per^ 
fan ci fill * 
gal li pot t 
al i quot 
ap ri cot 
em i grant 
de* ci mal 
fes ti val 
eth i cal 
bes ti al 
bur i al 
med 1 cal 
met ri cal 
tech ni cal ; : 
spher i cal ] 
men di cant 
sem i nal 
pel i can 
cler gy man 
ep 1 gram 
cler i cal 
fer Tj inan 
ver ti cal 
hec ti cal 
ep i taph || 



em i nent 
re^ i dence 
sed i ment 
ev i dence 
det ri ment 
pes ti lence 
ep i thet 
emp ti ness 
ex 1 gence 
ev i dent 
re^ i dent 
pen ni less 
mer ri ment 
pen i tenofe . 
neg li gence 
pre^ i dent ' 
re" gi ment 
re" gi men - 
neg li gent 
heav i ness 
sen ti nel 
pes ti lent 
per ti nence 
fspe" ci men 
em i lience 
per ti nent 
sen ti ment 
pen i tent 
sem i brief 



BOOK, NO. I. 

mer ci less 
read i ness 
clean li nes8 
den ti frice 
ed i fice 
len si tive 
fer ri age , 
def i nile 
ex qui ^te 
pre" ci pice 
len i tive 
gen i tive 
med i cine 
fem i nine- 
per vi 6us , 
ed i tor . 
lex i con 
myr ilii don 
en vi ous 
pres by ter 
ep i logue t 
in di ap 
mil i tant 
fin i cal 
mimical 
mys ti cal 
lyr i cal 
prin ci pal 
typ I caJ 



87 



■^^■•a 



* a mid. f 0, 3 qrt M to not 



(chuk. 



iipbM/. 



88 



JUVENILE SPELLING-BOC^K. 



phy/ i cal * 
crit ical 
whim si cal 
vis i tant 
crim i nal. . 
mjr i ad 
cliii 1 Qial^ 
dil i gent 
in ci dent 
diz ^i ness 
gid di neas 
sil li ness * 
dil i gence 
in di gence 
lin i ment , 
in di gent 
in fi del 
cit i zen 
im mi nent 
dif & jSience 
grit ti ness 
dif fi dent 
per qui site 
skep ti ci^m 
wit ti ci^m 
priv i lege 
dis ci pline 
in fi nite 
prim i tive 



crit i ci^m 
mit i mus 
sir i us 
im pi pus 
similar, 
sfcim i tar 
id i om . 
id i ot 
vitiri ol , 
dif fi cult 
nom i nal 
drop si cal 
or di nal t 
or di nance | 
prof li gate 
^os pi tal 
prod i gal 
com i cal 
op ti cal 
cog ni zance 
trop i cal 
prov i dent' 
prox i mate 
jol li ness 
prom i neftt 
prov i dence 
con fi dent 
con ti nence 
prom i nence 



con ti u^it 
cod i cil 
jiol i tics 
po5 i tive 
bb vi ous 
mon i tor 
pol y pus 
hoi ly hpck t 
of fi cer 
c|m ni um 
nau ti cal { 
cor di al 
gau di ness 
sau ci ness 
au di ence, 
hhugh ti ness 
au di tor 
scor pi on 
boun ti fill |( 
pub li can 
sup pli ant 
ul ti mate 
hqr ri cane 
sur li ness 
sul ki ness 
crus ti ness 
trus ti nesS' 
sul tri ness 
mul ti form 



'|*M& 



■foiStjUHia n*U 



(•i^«a,«i l^Uhnwl. 



i). 



AMEJUCAN SckoOL CLASS-BOOK, NO, I. 

o, stcond Billable, 80 m no. 



89 



AY CO ran 
ar ro gance 
par o quet 
ap o thefi'm 
c^l o mel 
al CO hoi 
pass o ver 



dem o crat 
tern po ral 
el o quent 
el o quence 
des po ti^m 
r:ftet o ric 
her o i^m 



pawn bro ker * her o ine 

daffodil * 

jac o bin 

ap po site 

cath o lie 

aph o ri^m t 



meth o dist 
ex odus 
ig no ranee 
syc o phant t 
in no cence 



im po tent, 
phil o mel t 
in so }ence 
in do letice 
friv o lous: 
syl lo ^^m 
hyp o crite 
con so nan( | 
op pa ^ite 
croc o dile 
cor o ner { ; 
cor po ral 
or tho dox 



Man u al 
hat u ral 
gcad a al 
ca^ u at 
act u al 
man tu a 
an nu al 
ad ju tant 
af flu ent 
af flu ence 
vac u uin 
tab u lar 
fab u lous 
glan du lous 



Q, second lyUable, as in mute. 



an gu lar 
gar ru lous v 
ar gu ment 
mas cu line^ 
man u script 
ca^ u ist 
fab u list 
man oeu vre || 
ar du ous 
pet u lence 
es cu lent 
trea^ u rer 
trem u lous 
meas ure ment 



regular - 
sec u lar . 
neb u lar 
sens u al 
virt u la 
fer u la 
rit u al 
fist u al ' 
sin gu lar 
tit u l^r 
vi^ u al s^ 
vir u leat 
min u *et 
pen du lum 



tfbtif. 



I, ^191. Mi* AM. 



't|M«»«0. 



90 



JUVENILE SPELLiNG-BOOK, 



Btreif u ous 
trem u lous 
icred u lous 
cens u rer 
lect u rer 
neb u lous 
em u lous 
sed u lous 
pen du lou& 
virt u ous 
cir cu lar 
prej u. dice 
gen u ine 
cher u bim 
in su lar 



riv u let 
in &a ence 
sin u ous 
pop u lace 
oc cu pant 
scrof u la 
op u lent 
doc ,u ment 
tnon «f laent 
op u lence 
con flu enee 
quad ru ped 
oculist 
glob u lar 
pop. u lar , 



con su lar 
joe u lar 
poet hu moua 
pop u lous 
formu la* 
frau du lent 
frau du lence 
cor pu lent 
mus cu lar 
punc tu al 
gut tu ral 
unc tu ous 
tur bu lence 
mus cu lous 
sum/) tu ous 



The first and tecood long^ the others short. 



A' re a 
a the ist 
a the i^m 
a que ous 
ve he ment 

Gla' ci ^te 
sa ti ate 
ra di ate 
dai^ry maid 
la dy like 
de yi at^ 
me di ate 



ve he mence 
right e oua 
me te or 
bo re as 
du te ous 

All the syllables long, 
i, y, second syllable, as e. 



beau te ous 
tu te lar 
hu me ral 
pu e rile 
cu ne dl 



•«bta,l«/Lbn«^ 



ra ti o 
o li o 
foli o 
o pi ate 
spo li ate 
fo li ate 
fo li age 



du pli cate 
lu bri cate 
ru mi nate t 
mu ti late 
fu mi gate 
mu ci lage 
nu tri ture 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. L 

^ u, second syllable, aii innA, mute. 



91 



Vi' o late 

1 do lize 

mi CTO scopO' 



Ra' di us 
pa tri ot 
va ri ous 
ca ri ous 
a ri ei 
sa pi ent 
bai li wick 
a li as 
la bi al 
la i cal 
va ri ance 
radiance 
ma ni ac 
pa tri arch * || 
sa li ent 
state li ness 
a pri cot t 
ve ni al 
gem al 
ea #i ness 
pre vi ous 
de vi ous 
Be ni or 
ge nius 



zo o phy te 
pro to type 
eu lo gize 

The second l<mg;, the others short, 
i, second syllable, as e 

se ri ous 
te di ous 
pe ri od 
me di um 
pre mi um 
re qui em 
le ni ent 
wea ri ness • 
se vi es 
pre sci ence 
spri^At li nes& 
zo di ac 
jo vi al 
o ri ent 
ho li ness 
lone li ness 



tu ma late 
lu cu brate 
cu mu late 



TS 



r I in I ■■! I 



o pi um 
scho li um* 
CO pi ous 
o di um 
o di ous 
glo ri oun 
pu ri tan 
ju ry man 



mu si cal 
cu bi cal 
nu tri ment 
ru di ment J 
u hi verse 
fu gi tive 
nu tri tive 

crucifixj: 
u ni tive 
cu ri ous 
du bi ous 
fu ri ous 
ju ni per 
u ni on 
u ni son 
ju ni or 
lu di crous 
glu ti nous 
lu mi noufii 
spu ri ous 
stu di ous 
lu bri cous 
du ti fill 
beau ti ful 






|«f9 Vr|.a»ia 



92 

E go tiBt 

the o rem 
the o rist 
e go tism 

Gay' e ty 
se ere cy 

La' i ty 
wa ri ly 
la zi \y 
de i ty 
gree di ly 



JUVENILE SPELLING-BOOK* 
6) u, second syllable, as la no, mtite. 



sci o list 
vi o list 
vi o let 
di cess 

All the syllables long^. 

scc^ ne ry, 
pi e ty 

i, second syllable, as e. 

fepee di ly 
ea Si ly 
fea ^i bly 
tidily 
' for ci bly 



vi o lenco 
vi o lent 
tix^ual 
inu tu al 



po e try 
poe sy 

ju bi lee 
pu ri ty 
u ni ty 
mu ti ny 
pleu ri sy 



Lai' ce ny * 
mas te ry * 
taf fe ta 
eel e ry 
en e my 



The firsftyllabU short, (be others long. 



rem e dy 
her e sy. 
el e gy 
em e ry 
sym metiy 



mys te ry 
com e dy 
pro" ge, ny 
proph e sy t 
cour te sy 



The fifst syllable shon, the others bag;. 



Par'ity 
sanity 
ami ty 
rari ty 
cav i ty 
chas ti ty X 
charity 
gravity 



suav i ty|| 

happily 
fami ly 

craftily 

hand i ly 

lax i ty 

van i ty 

sane ti ty 



des ti ny 
den si ty 
len i ty 
e" qui ty 
en mi ty 
brevity 
effigy 
le" gi bly 



•««■ 



tf«»t, 



fl« 



-■^v 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO- I. 9^ 



mer ri ]y 
ver i ]y 
per fi dy 
dig nr ty 
dim i ty 
VIS i hiy 
bod i ly 
prod i gy 

Can' o py 
pan o ply 
rAap so dy 
par o dy 
bar mo ny f 
psalm o dy 

Pei^ ju ty 
mer cu ry 
pen u ry 



prob i ty 
horn i ly 
hor ri bly 
pos si bly 
(juan ti ty 
lal si ty * 
pau ci ty ; 
plan ^i bly 

0, second syllable, sis in no. 

lep re sy » 
mel o dy 
eb o ny 
sytn pho ny 
col o ny 
col lo quy 

n, second syllable, as in mute. «» 



au di bly 
gau di ly 
haufi^fe ti ly 
sau ci ly 
sub si dy 
luck 1 ly 
wor THi ly 
&ul ki ly 



mon p dy 
pros o dy 
ob lo quy 
cus to dy 
cur sory; 
thor ough ly 



dep u ty 
cent u ry 
injury 



vol u bly 
au gu ry ^ 
lux u ry 



2^ Whffli / precedes y, in a final syllable, the y is then pro- 
pounced as long; and open as if the accent were on it ; tbas^ j^tfih^ 
qualify, ice. 



The ^t syllable short, the others long^. 



rar e fy. 

Grat'ify 
rat i fy 
ram i fy 



mad e fy 
cal e fy 

i, second syllable, as e. 



li que fy 
proph e sy 



pa" ci fy 

mag ni fy 
sane ti fy 



fjscar i fy 
am pli ly 
dam ni fy 



^maiii.ljyi'biwd. 



fa, 1st t>U Mui^. 



94 

edify 

tes ti fy 
ver i fy 
ver si fy 
9pe" ci fy 
rec ti fy 
pet ri fy 
cer ti fy 
gem i III 
lea i fy 



JUVKNILE SPELLING-BOOK. 



De'ify 
no ti fy 
glorify 



Sim pli fy 
sig ni fy 
dig ni fy 
vii i fy 
viv 1 fy 
vit ri fy 

fyp ' *y 

mod i fy 
mol li fy 
OS si fy 

All fhe sjrllabies Icmg. 
i, Becoad^llable, as e. 

pu ri fy 
pu tre fy 
beau ti fy 



qual i fy 
fal si fy • 
fpr ti fy 
mor ti fy 
nul li fy 
dul ci fy 
stul ti fy 
fruc ti fy 
jus ti fy 
mul ti ply 



ci fy t 



stu 

cm ci ly 
bru ti fy 



The two first loQig^y th^ last)8carcel3r perceptible* 
i, second syllable, as e. 



Fea' *i ble 
cru ci ble t 

Par^ ti cle J 
ar ti cle 
fran gi ble 
fallible 
chron i cle 
hor ri ble 
do" ci ble 



for ci ble 
cu ti cle 



|fu ri ble 

I 



The first Ions:, th^ others short. 



•o» 



pos si ble 
,au di ble * 
plau ri ble 
cred i ble 
flex i ble 
le" gi ble 
sen si ble 



ter ri bte 
fen ci ble 
vi^ i ble 
prin ci pie 
vin ci ble 
mul ti pie 
cur ri cle 



't «^ •( I ^L bread. f u, 1 ajrl. m q^ ^ •, } tyL n m br. 



UekMk 



AMERICAN SCHOOL. CLASS-BOOK, NO. I. 95 
THE HONEST LITTLE BOY. 

The honest little boy is fair and upright in all hia 
words and actions,. He is not so mean as to impose upon 
any one by a falsehood. He never speaks ill, ^r slanders 
any one. He is above practising a cheat in word or deed : 
if tempted to do it, he gets out of tiie way as soon as he 
can. 

In his conversation he will not go beyond the bounds 
of truth to make his story more plausible* He always 
tdls it just a^ it is. He keeps his word on all occasions, 
and performs whatever he promises. 

Troth he values more than money, and neiljier bribes 
nor threats can make bim depart from4t. He never steals, 
nor robs oixliards nor gardens of their fruit. If he wants 
some fruit, he always goes and asks for it. 

He would not tell a lie, were he sure of gainings purse 
of gold by if;; for he is certain that what had been so 
gained, would do him no good. 

One of his school-mates was once charged with a &ult, 
of whidi he fead been guilty.— What do yoK, think he 
did ?•— Before all the school, he went to his preceptor and 
confessed th^ whole afiair. 

His preceptor rebuked him gently for the fault, but, 
for declaring the truths highly commended bim. — Well 
done my hon^t little boy, sa^d he; — ^go on in this way 
always remember to be as true and just through all your 
life, and a good coi^science will attend you at last. 

No body ever thought of suspecting him ; all who knew 
him would trust him on^ny occasion. His open look, his 
hono^t ur, his faithful tongue, won th^ hearts of all 

'J 2 



96 



Jt7VENn^£ SPELLING-BOOK. 



90r When the learner has been careAilly taught tlie leaioils ooa* 
tam^ in the ptecBC&n^ part of the work, and been confirmed in the 
general principles of pronunciation, it will be less necessary to pursue 
the same mode of arrangement. The words, however, in the sue-. 
cee<£n|f spelling lesaoas, have been classed as analogously as possible ; 
and it is believed will aid, in a considerable degree, the pronuncia- 
tion/ and render the leamer^jl progress much easier, than thoae ar- 
rangements which require frequent transitioas from words composed 
•1^ long syllables to others of short ones, and vice versa. 

Words of three syllables, accented on the first. 

All the ^Uables short. 



Ad' a mant 
cat a ract 
BBS sa frae 
cal a bash 
anagram 

par 11 lax 
al pJ»a bet * - 
par al iel 
sac ra ment 
ar iii£i. ment f 
parapet 
ab la tive 
av a rice 
par ra ti^e 
gal van i^m 
a qua tile 
bar ba rwm t 
pal a tine 
al ka line 



ar a bic 
tamarind 
par a di^m , 
vag a bond 
cat a logue 
par a dox 
tan ta mount 
calamus, 
bar ba rous 
am a zon 
mas sa ere 
cAar ac ter 
bal an cer 
scon da lous 
ter ma gant 
prev a lent 
tes ta ment 
per ma nent 
prev a lence 
per ma nence 



•««*«• 



r^aic 



t^^ifil wivfar. 



-ri- 



rel a tive 
seraphim* 
jes sa mine 
mer^ «i ni^in 
mer can tile 
neg a tiv^ 
em pha sis ♦ 
l^elg ma tie 
her ba list 
ver sa tile 
sen a tor 
met a phor • 

Een ta gon ^ 
ep ta gon 
hexagon 
ped a gogue 
dem a gogue 
syn a gogue 
im ma nent 

cit a del 

■ 1 1 11., 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. I. 97 



fit a ment 
pjrr a mid 

8jl la bus 
sil la bub 
vil Ian ous 
cin na mon 
in fa raous 
com ba tant 
con tra band 
oc ta gon* 
voc a tive 
Tol a tile 
log a rithms 
laud a num 
or an ges 
inor al ist 
ta/k a tive I 
or gan ist 
al ma na0 
or a tor 
ley al ist 
roj al ist 
sub Stan tire 
vul gar i^m 
frus tra tive 
jour nal ist 
nut crack er^ 
eub al temt 



pas sa.ble 
laugh a ble||| 
pal pa ble 
par a ble 
af fa ble 
trac ta ble 
ar a ble 
ef fa ble 
rec tan gle 
rent a ble 
spec ta cle 
bin na cle 
pin na cle 
mir a cle 
syl la ble 
or a cle H 
ob sta cle 
prob a ble 
cul pa ble 
lat er al 
mack er el 
bar ren ness 
ab ject ness 
crab bed ness 
ad jec tive 
val en tine 
labyrinth 
lav en der 



pas sen ger 
rav en ous 
an ces tor^ 
chan eel lor 
cal en der 
mar vel lousH 
car pen ter 
gen er ^1 
led er |tl 
sev er al 
gen er ant 
vet er an 
ped es tal 
tem per ance 
main ten ance 
rev er end 
rev er ence 
lev er et 
ref er ence 
jpref er ence 
(deference 
per feet ness 
bless ed ness 
dex ter ous 
zeph yr ousj: 
mes sen ger 
lev el ler 
nee tar ine 



.f|^figfttiaB0|» 






^i^mm 



■»»" 



lib'eral 
literal 
min er al 
it er ant 
sid er al 
in ter val 
in fer ence . 
quin t^s sence 
in tpr est 
in tej lect 
wicl^ ed nees 
in ter diet 
in ter im 
lib er tine 
kil der kin 
prot es tant j| 
op er a 
prov en d^r 
or ches tre * t 
sor cer er 
isior cer ess 
coon seller 
con fer ence j| 
nov el ist 
njusk melton 
sue cess or 
can die stick 
gen tie ness 



JUVENIUB SP£LLOrO-600X^ 

ket tie drum bar binger J ' 



lit de ness 
sin gle ness 
brit tie ness 
chris/ en ing t 
chris/ en dom 
trou" ble some 
tal i^ man 
cab in et 
ban ish ment 
blan dish* ment 
black ish ness 
can did ness 
chas ti^e ment 
Ian guid ness 
man age merit 
Ian guish ment 
sav age neijs 
laF ish ment 
gar nish ment | 
iat in ist 



van ish ing 
Iat in ism 
bar ris ter 
can is ter 
ban ish er 
prac tis er 
scav en ger 



mar m er 
cen trie al 
pen sivc ness 
pet tash ness 
Iself i&h ness 
prem is e^ 
cred it or 
re" gis ter 
mid ship maa 
cyn ic al 
vi" gil ancc 
vf* gil iant 
spir it less 
skit tish ness 
ri'' gid ness 
fri" gid ness 
cyl m der 
spir it ous 
vi^ it er * 
sin is ter 
quick sil ver 
king fish er 
min is ter 
mil lin er 
cAor is ter 
lo" ^ic al 
sol id ness 






-WW 



■^ 



^^m 



■^PSPP 



■P^WP 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK,, NO. h 09 



Qov' id ness 

{)ol iah er 
rol ic some 
cm in ODS 
pun i&h ment 
6ul len nciss 
8lut tish neds 
nour ish ment 
flour ish ing 
pub lish er 
8cur ril ous 
law giv er * 
nau til us 
quar rel some 
moun tain oias 
rap tur ous 
ran cor ous 
clam or ous 
slan der ous 
can cer ous 
haz ard ous 
smat ter er 
3tam mer-er 
slan der er 



af ter ward* Itim or ous 
part ner sbip f mid sum mer 



mar tyr dom t gib ber ish 
chat ter er sil ver smith 
flat ter er lie or ice 

gaTH er er |whis per et 



pat ron age 
sat ir ist 
par son age t 
backwardness 
scaf fold ing 
gaTH er*ing 
par ox i^m | 
zeal ous nesa 
per son al 
per son age 
ten der ness 
sep ul chre || 
treach er ous 
mea* ure ment 
tpep per mint 
cir cum stance 
cir cum flex 
cir cum spect 
dif fer ent 
hin der ance 
fish er man 
differ ence 



vig orous 
rig or ous 
pii fer er 
bit ter ness ^ 
pros per ous IT 
pon der^us 
log ger head 
bot torn less 
of fer ing 
suffer ance 
mus nvl man: 
hus band man 
num ber less 
cov er let 
com fort less 
gov ern ment 
but ter milk 
cov er ing, 
bins ter ing 
coj our ing 
suf fer ing 
mur mur ing 
bluQ der buss 
blun der er 
gov ern our 
mur der er 



• i^OflqrL btoaiL f't IqrL Minrtr. { o, 3 tjrL u in not. ])obwkr 



300 



mvmiLE.BFTUJISG'hOOK. 



miV phdr ouB * 
v\ cer oils . 
suffer er 
cum ber wme 
i^'on d«r ful 
power fult 



^oun ter check al der man 



caun ter feit 



cow ard ice 
coun ter part' 
cu cum her 
coun termarch 
bois ter ous 
coun ter poke 



awk ward ness 



Man ful nesis % 
art ful ness 
health ful ness 
sih ful ness 
ekil fill ness 
wil ful ness 
watch ful ness][ 
aw fulness f 



The first and second short, the last long. 



Par^ a phraie ^ 
cast a way 
lig ^ra vate 
car a way 
car al cade 
Vas sal age 
«al a mine 
par a site 
scan da lize 
par a lyze 



I 



em a nate 
bed lam ite 
en ta teuch 1[ 
ec a tomb ** 
in fant ile 
sifi[ nal ize 
Is/m pa thize 
stigmatize 
tyr an ni^ 
syc a more 



fiSLC cha rine H mis an thrope 



ian ta lize 

«m a lyze 

par a dise 

Black a moor Ifor ma lize 

eat a comb ** 



par a movu* 
tab la ture 
sep a rate . |mus ca dine 



sig na ture 
prop a g9^te 
gor man dize t 



or gan ize, 
mor al ize 
run a gate 



av er age 
la" cer ate 
par ent ^ge 
ma" cer ate 

agger ate tt 
sat el lite 

ap ert ure 

an ec dote 

tem per ate 

fed er ate 

ven er ate 

ex er ci^e 

fer til ize 

ser pen tine 

en ter pri^^e 

in ter space 

in ter change 

sev en fold 

in ter course 



>ti& 



tltrLlnwd. 
IfckMk. 



^ 0, 3. 2 qfl. M in ML 
ft 99i.t% 9Jft win MO* 



ttfwi- 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-dOOK, NO. I. lOl 



in' ter lude 
in ter view 
op er ate * 
tol er ate 
mod er ate 
lat in ize 
ma*^ gis trate 
her mit age 
des ig nate 
le ' fi^is late 
CIV 11 ize 
vi" cin age 
bil lingf gate 



!>il grim ag€^ 
iron tis piece 
for feit ore t 
rec og nize 
ex or ci*e 
rec om pense 
rec on dite 
rec on cile 
sat ir ize 
af ter taste 
parson aget 
at ter game 
ancAorage 



mas ter ptece { 
*sepultare 
cir cum ci^e 
yes ter night 
per son age 
ul cer ate 
tur pen tine . 
thun der bolf 
fur THer m6r^ 
sub ter fuge 
cov ert ure 
coim ter change 
coun ter poise 



The first long, the others diort. 



0r a gram 
di a dem 
di a lect 
di al hng 
di al ist 
hy a cinth 
di a per 
di a mond 
di a logue 
the a tre 
pla gia ri^m 
vo tanst 
post mas ter 



lu na tic 
rheu maii^m 
ca pa ble 
sale a ble 
blame a ble 
pay a ble 
eat a ble 
pli a ble 
no ta ble 
fore cas tie 
port a ble 
eu ra ble 
du ra ble 



suit a ble 

eye wit nesa 
i^in^ass 
mil tin oua 
lu cid ness 
pu trid ness 
scru tin ous || 
ru in OI13 
foolishness 
fa vour ite 
la hour w 
bay on et 



et^li|l«liM% t^iULkmi. tsl^«to^ ll«ilirt«Mi''' 



102 



JUVENILK fiPELLING-BOOK. 



va' pour ish 
dan ger cub 
fe ver ish 
sea wn ing 
ea ger ness 
mea ger nes9 
ri ot ous , 
i dol ist 



o rer plus 
so jourR er . 
fu ncr al 
nu .mcr al 
nu mer ous 
hn mor ist 
su per fice 
faita ful ness * 



grate ful ness 
grace ful ness 
heed ful aess 
cheer ful ness 
spite ful ness 
(right ful ness 
hope ful ness 
fruit ful ness i 



The middle abort, the othen lon^. 



Pa' pa cy J 
va can cy 
va gran cy 
kna ve ry 
sla ve ry 
a gen cy 
ma son ry 
le gal ly 
fi nal ly 
pri ma ry 
pri va cy 



di a ry 
de cen cy 
re gen cy 
de cent ly 
fre quent ly 
dy nas ty 
bri be ry 
i ro ny 
i vo ry 
no ta rv 
vQ ta ry 



!to tal ly 
no ta bly 
no bo" dj 
droll e ry 
for ge ry 
gro ce r? 
po tent ly 
CO gen cy 
CO gent ly 
flu en cy 
cru el ty f 



Tb^ first and seoood diort, tlie last long;. 



Affably 
ap a thy 
al ka li 
fal la cy 
CArV ai fy 



an ar chy jf 
am nes ty 
an ces try 
tap es try 
maj es ty 



bar her rylt 
ar den cy 
ar dent ly 
car pen try 
ca chex yy 



• »*■■ 



•^•■yLMtafulL tu,l«jrl.Mo* f|M«i ff^Mk. IT i* 1 qrL M h few. 



«1 ■^■PP»» H 



AMDRit Atl 8CH0(^ CLASS-BdM; 190. ). |0 



ad' verse Ij 
ra^ber ry 
ta" cit ly 
lav ^h ly 
Saturday 
cal ^nn ny 
fac ul ty ' 
bat^te Tj 
quack e ry. 
rail le ry i 
haggardly 
back ward ly 
chao ce 17 
lat ter ly^ 
man ner ly 
artery*" 
ar mo ly 
mas ter ly 
ped an try 
plea^ an try ^ 
sec ta ly 
ec sta cy 
pleasantly 
spe'^.cial ly 

een al ty 
er al dry 
Ter bal ly 
ten der iy 



lev e ry 
energy 
elderly 
fer ven ^y 
ciev ier ly 
pe/ feet ly 

ieopardy 
lap tar cny t 
beggarly 
leth ar gy 
treach e ry . 
litany 
tyranny 
infancy 
in iant ry 
bigamy 
in & my 
chtvaliyl 
bilberry 
min is try 
lit ur gy 
lib er ty 
bit ter ly 
mi* e ry 
vie to ry 
his to ry 
livery 
fish e ry 



in dus try 

bigotry 

con stall cy 

mod es ty 

80ph is try | 

ccHnmohiy 

pom pous ly 

monarchyt 
poyerty 

prop er if 
lot te ry 
sor ce ry 1 
sum ma ry 
c<mi pa ny 
eul pa bly 
bur gla ry 
vul gar ly 
cur ren cy 
mul ber 17 
guivnenr 

nu* band tjf 
nur se ry ' 
drud ge ry 
pun ne ry - 
slov en ly 
broth er ly 
trum pe ry 
fill some ly 



mm^m 



•%tifl.M|ifikr. 



|««ki 






itiiiMf tr«kiviiiii|/ 



ISA "^ ^ujsioi.^ sr£LLw64€iai;;; 






f 



TKte W0RK9017«E «OT. 

A boy, abourten years of age, having lost his father, 
and his mother 1)0 mg ill at an hospital, was sent to the 
woriliouse. He behaved ivell, and worked 'hard, that 
he mi^st if eseiH'e fte food^ and ctothes, and o&er nc^es 
sanesi whicfi. were allowed him. • . ' 

Very soon he had some money giten him as a reward, 
and he vvas trtd tha.t he might do with the money jiist as 
lie plei^d. As sopn as he had receiTod it, he ask«d his 
master's lieav^ to go and'see his mother, and Ue todk the 
money, witlrhiiii sli^ gavp it t6 hcJr, 

She ^s T£sry tha|nkful-fot<it, and said that she sbimld 
erer refnieiiriier.the kindness of n^ dear little son, who 
took fliifjh c^p^ of: iijBr in her distress. 

O how, glad ha must have felt, wH^n (le gave th« money 
to his mpthor i U was very little, i)iit it was all he iiad to 
give ; apd hm p^ she ihi^t have been to have so good 
ason! / . ' 

T^E LITTIiE GARDENEH'S GIFT. 

A Uttlc boy had a garden, a spade^ a rake, alidra hoe. 
He wai. verj folid ji^f worjkii^ in 'his garden. One sum- 
mer he luid in '4t a great Qiany pretty flowers, and a 
iilack tr^a g€Mifiel»eiTy4}ush, aii4 some peas. 

)^^n his peas.^ere quifo ripe, hq said to his Isbter, 
<< I wiU tak0 a basket, and pick M xny pea?^ and my 
gooseb^iw/ and ^aiYy^them. tQ th^ ppor lan^e mon otf 
the common ; he is so ill now, that he cannot rid.e on his 
htxm^ 9S te^useil tQ do, and gQ to work." , 



AMERICAN 9CHQ0I;. CLA^S-BQOI^ KO. I. 106 
, Bo A^ Jittle b»y fetqhed his ^kct^ aad, wad. very iMisy 
picking hisrpeftS* and. gAosefaeriiesj tind wheii he h$t4 
picked tiMBiyhe carried tkem to the poor old mtn; &q4 
put them on the tai^e; i. 

The poor old niaii .was sitting by the preside, qtfte 
alone; for ha$. wift waa gon^^ oiit to work^ and hit 
cliiidren were a great way bfil Wli^ his slaw the> VMa^ 
boy c«me in^ and pat Ih^'peas ai&d g^seb^ie^ n|)(m tl^ 
tablet he smiledy and Iciobed glad^und thanked him tek^ 
kindly. .a \ . ? > 

' The Ul^'bey seemed yery. happy. His sister was 
pleased to see jhim so good to ^epoor old man. I danqh 
^y, when the fild.nuEin ate liS» peas and htS;goo8eberries$ 
he thongiit of the little boy^ and said, ^' I hope God will 
bless that young gentleman, who is so very good to me.'^ 

THE.SUN.„. ^ ., 

* i * ' 

The sun rises in ffie east^ and when he rises i^ is day^ 
He sMnes iipen<tiie trees and the itans^s, and upon the 
water, /and evehy Ihtng ItNiksspflprklihg add beautiful, 
when he'.ahifie^ iipon it; He gives us light and he^t ; it 
is hfe that niak» it Waim; fie makbd the fruit rrpen, and 
the corfi ripeH. If he; did not shine upon tile fields, ami 
upon the gardens; nothidg would grmv. » 

Sftmetitn^ he l^kes off his crMti 4f i»iglft rays, and 
wraps up Ms head iti thib silver cW»ucU> mA tiken we nm^ 
look at h^\ batWIieAl^^re afe iiO irloud^, andheshin«!i 
with 'A\ ^s bi^htness at ftbdnd^, ^'Weu^niibt look at 
him, fbl*1ie wc^M 'A^tWSim^ eyes^aild iftftke t^ bliridt 
Only tl^ eagle can look at hlW then ; thfe eigle with hig 
strong piercing'cye can gaze lijtoil him %hva^. 



WUn dift son u goii^ to,ri8« in tilt iii(M*ning and 
make it daj, Ae lark fties up in flie skjr ip meet him, 
fhd sings swe«1ij in thie airi mad tfte cctck crowa loud 
iatell eveij fi^j that he is coming* 

But the 9wl anct the bat fljr awaj when thejr aee'htn^ 
i&d hide thraiselTts in old vaRs and holloMr trees $ and 
the lion and^ tl)0 tiger go into tbiar dens a)nd caves, 
where they sleep ali^e di^« He diimes in all countries, 
all over the earth. lie is die most beantilul and glorioas 
Olgect that can be seen in the >whole world.^ 

« The sun is not God,'though his noblest imiage." "^^e 
way admire the sun, but must not worship him* . He 
who i^ade the sun is entitled to our |N:aise« 

, tuts MOON. 

The moon shines to give us light in tiie night, when 
Ae sun is set She is verj beiiutjj(kl and white, like 
ailver. ^'e may look at her always, Ibr.she is not.'so 
kri^-ht as to dazde our eyes, and ahe n^ver scorches us. 

T e moon^s mild afid gentie. 1^ leta evcsn^e litti^ 
glow-worms sMoe, wUch are quite darle by day. The 
stars shine alE roun4 her, but aHe se^« lais^r jand 
Iri^l^ter than. the stars^ and looks \\ke a l^rge .pearl 
amongst a great many imall sparkling diamonds* 

M^hen yon ire asleepf riie sUnes thrisugh your fsiir* 
laina witih her gentle beams, and seems to say, ^SAeep 
mi, poor little tired boys, I will no{t diftnrb you.^' The 
tHJ^tiogul* wngs to her» and sii^ better than all tlie 
nkofth^air. 1^ sits upon a thorn^aa^ sings sweetly 
Ijll the night Ioi|g> while tiie dew lies upon the grtts% 
«nd e^Ptry i3m$ ttoond is still and silent 



AMERICAN SCHOPL CLASS^BQOfi NO. I. Ifft 

^ \ " ■ : .^ '..TBDE SWAK.,. ^, ,,,.,,. . ^, 
All birds that snim in tlie water arq web-footed. 'JTlieir 

io^ ate, j^in^d togctfier bj a skiu. that gro^vs between 

Hkcm"} that'll beyuagwebrfoote/d ; and it helps, the birds to 

swbOL well^ for tli<$n tbeir feet are i>kp ,the fins, of a ^sh. • 

The swan i$ «i large bird, large;: than.a goose. Its bill is 
red, but the sides of italre black : and it has black about its 
ejea. Its legs are duskj^ but its feet are red^ and it is 
web-footed. Its body is. all white, as, white asf snow, and 
v^y beaiitifuL j ... . . . 

' Th^ awan l^s a ve|f long neck. It lives in rivers and 
hkef $ tad esits plants, that grow in tlie \yater, and s^eds, 
aDd,littIet4n8ecti»4(.iid apaik* It dues not look pretty when 
ft walks u{H>n tHjgroujad^ tn^it cannot walk well 5 but whe]| 
itis in the wf^t^r swi^^aioaag^^inQotiily along, arciung its long 
neck, and dipping its white breast, with whicli it make^ way 
through the ,wifter,'it id th'e tnofit graceltifr of all birds. 

The swan buildi her vest ^inong the reei^s and ruiihes^ 
TKe nest is made of sticks and lohg gnsj^, ^nd it i^ verj^ 
large ind^faigh, * She sits upon- her e^ for two months^ 
then they are hatched, and the young ones are callei^ 
cygnets. iThey are not white at first, but grayish. 

If any body were ta eofine near the swan when ^he j[^ 
> in the nest, siting upon tier egga, or when she has young 
ones, she would % at him ; for she is veiy fierce to de- 
fend her young;' and if he were to come to take thei* 
away> she would beat himdoWn witlrher strong wings, 
and periiaps break his arm%^ The s^an li^es a great whi}^; 

TIR! RABBIT. 

-fist xMii is TlBrj, hmeeieiit and gentle. Its colour is 
brown 5 but in <i0untriea which are very cold, it ix^rn^ m 



I»\ -^ 



[^ 108 nrvuNiLfi svEUSHOM^okr , / 

I . whjte M snow, its Up is parted atid very hairy ; and it 

I always ma?€8 its lips. 

The rabbit feeds upQn herbs and r<$tB) aiid the bark 
of young tre^ ; and sometimes it will ereep fhrottgh-the 

I fcedge, and steal into thtf giotietii, to eat pinks 'aind a 
little p^r^ley; and it loves to |jay and skip aboiut by 
moonlight, and to bite the tender blades of grass; when 
the ctevT is upon them ; but in the daytime it'sll»e|)s iii its 
form. . '■ • ■*• ' ■ • ■ ■ ^' 

Siie sleeps with her eyes open, beeauge she is very 
fearfT)J and timid : and when trii^ heai^ the tettsl nirfset 
^e starts and sticks np her large ears: ind whea the 
liunt^man sounds his horn, arid fte (Maor harmless ralfbit 
lleai-s the dogi coming, she ruite cwiiy vtrfswiAiyf strait 
ftrward, stretchiog Ker legs, and leavlsft tte dogs behiifd. 

TEirPRRNESS TO.MQTHBI(.fl« . 

Observe, said a fiither to lus soa, the anxious care of 
Most livingf crealttfesfor their yoimg! Boes net this sight 
aaggest to ytfi . the tendemess 'and affection of your 
ttiother^ ' ■ ■' '':-^ "'" ••■" *■•*■' ' 

Her vi^tokfttl care protected you in the helpless period 
of infancy; when She noitrished you, tataght^your limhs to 
move and yeinr tongue to Hsp its unrormed accents. • 

In yotor .c^dhood She ihoumed^ 6v^ your little griefs ; 
tejoiced in^youir innocent dielights $ adrntBistered to' yon 
tiie heiilingbdm in sickness vahd instilled intp ycur 
aiind the lovcf of 'truth, of virtae^^ and of Wisdom. 

Oh ! cherish every sentimeiit of respect for such a J 
aMvttier. fflie merits your wannest gratitade^ eateem and 
veneration^ 



AMKRICA^ SCROOt ClJIdS^llOOK, NO. I. 109 
Vkn^ «C ^Qired syllable* with Ih^ SLCcent on Ihe i^caa^ ' 

* - • " - 

t -TKe wc9od vylfati^ }oog, tile others short. 
V9Wel8 ^d.daphthongs, second syllable as a in fate. 



Ab sail' ^t , lal lay er 
ar ma da f ap prai^ er 
ac quaint ance ver hh tim 



a base; tnent 
a bate tnent 
ac quaint eii 
a maze meat 
apparent , 
at tain mel^t 
a rail oient. 
arch angdi'* 
trai^ pa re^t 
ad jac^qt r . 
as suaisde ment 
arrangement 
a ma zing 
ar raJgn ing 
ab 'stfon ing. 
as ^ua sive 
pan da mus 
ar ca.aum. * 
.a9 aajl er 
narrator 



tes ta trix 
en slave ment 
en gage ment 
en gra ycsf . 
tes ta tor* 
en dan get 
main tain €^ 
•m Ua zofi 
en gra ying. 
per sqasive 
ex plain ing ' 
in va sire 
dis Dlky ing 
di^ dain ing 
di8 $ua sive 
die tator ' 
di^ daih fill t 
in vei^A er 
com^ain ant 



com pla fient 
con ca VQU3 
con vey or 
eol la tor 
for sa ken* 
for bear ance 
sul ta na 
pur vey ance 
sus tain er ' 
cour age ous " 
sur vey or 
un aid ed 
un va tied 
un fei^n ed 
un Bta \Ae 
un a ble 
un i^ha kea 
un fa ^ei 
up braid ing 
sus tain ing 
un fail inff 
im faifh ful f 
uiji gri^te iiii 



con vey ance 

The^int anl second loi^ tht etl^frt ih^ri^ 

E la'^ ted Ire pair ing |de Iw ting 

ae date ness (pre vnllng j^e ba sing 



rtipM 



•«,lVi«lii 



f^tifkiN. 



■w 



iia 



swmn^ ggpcpiN^-Boos:. 



e va sive 
ere a tivc 
de.gra ding 
de claim ing 
cre a tor 



be tray er 
te qua tor 
hi a tus\( 
so na td 



jo befing 
j^ro ^a ic;, 
pro fa nin^ 
pro cldim ing 



Pa na' do 

far ra'go 



The tot short, {he bthcTs long; 

' Ibra y a do Ivol ca no 



oc ta v6 



u 



toriia do * 



Vowels and dlpliili©ngs, socond syllable as < kt me. 



Ag griev' anee 
ap f^ear aiice 
al le giance 
ad he rent 
ad he ,rence 
a chiiSve nient 
a grefe ment 
ap peas ing 
ad he sive 

ar senict. 
ap pear ing 
al be it * 



all see ing 
arch d^a con t 
en fee ble 
in ve? gle 
il le gal 
im peach ment 
in de cent 
in he reiit : 
con ceaJ meni 
Icon ceit ed ! 
concealing 
con geal ing 



un*e qiiaT 
sub pofe na . 
un Ire (|uertt 
un ccven ' 
un yield ed 
un wea ricS 
un heed ing 
un feeling 
un ceas iti^ ' 
un pleas ing 
un mean n^ 
mi widd ing 



4 



The GiiA and second Ions:, .the .others short. 



Gene' va * 
pr^ce dence 
. de ceiv er 
de mean our 
re deem er 
re lieyniif ^ 
re peal ing' 



be liev er 
de ceit ful 
pf i me val t 
i de rf * ' 
i"d^ hi ^ ^^ ' 
chi me rd#j 



hy fe na 
CO he rent 
CO he feivie* 
CO e qudl * 
co<e ^1 
pro ce^^ing 

mu 9b nm ^ 



*«.«,l9LW«Uk ' t^latVLiiinAr. tvM^iUM«ffiM»' (|«k««^ 



AMERICAN SC»0OI> CLASS-BOOK, NO. I. Ill 

The first short, th^ others kmf^. 

Al le' gro - jmos che to |tor pe do ' 

Vowels and diphthongB, secbnd srllablft ai t in fint. 



Al ]i' ance 
Ba li va 
ar ri val 
a bi ding, 
as s\gn ment 
ac qui re4 
ad vi^ex 
and i ron . 
back sli der 
as, si zer 
ad mi rer , 
bap ti zer 
ac quire mienf 
a sy* lum 
m^ si D^ 
ex cisB^ man 



en \ight en 
en li vpn : 
en diet nient 
en tice meat 
ex cite ment 
en ti tie 
.en Ti ron 



con fine ment 
eon cise neaa 
com pi ling 
con spi ring 
com pi ler 
com pli er 
con tri ver 



mis gui d^uice un pli ant 



in cite ment 
in qui rer 
dis qui eC 
dis ci pie 
con^ni vance 
com pli ance 
con tri vance 



con 8ig*n ment j^rur vi ver 



un bl as 
up rifi-At ness 
sub si dencQ 
un kind nesfl . 
un like nes4[ 
sur vi ving 
sub scri Mir 



19^ lint and second lQfi|» tetoflier shoiiit. 



DenTal 
te qui tal 
de fi am^e 
de cri al 
be hind hand 
re cilal 
re ?i ¥al 
re pri «al ; 
^-^ — 5;sw 



re vi ^ 
he giTft 
re tu*e ment 
refinement 
be ni^&l ed 
pre cise nesa 
de pri ving 
de fi ling. 



decisiye*^' 
de si^n ing 
re fi ittiig 
di vi ded 
de ni er 
de ri der 
de ci pher t 
de fi ner ; 



tpkMC; 



di vi' SOT 
4«i spi sex, 
te vi ^er 
de ^i rous 



JWEmhR SFELIil^G-B<X^. 



di vi der 
de HirM some 
de spite ful * 
de light ful 



re mind ful 
pro vi der 
o bii gmg 
ho ri zon 



Towels and diphtbong^) second ^'liable a3 o itt no. 



Ab do''men • 
a tone meht ; 
agoiing^ 
ap pr6ach ing 
aurorat 
ma rail deir 
cajoler ; 
all ^now ing f 
trans port ing 
en rol ment 
en force merit 
en lb ble 



Bn clo ser 
ex plo ring 
en gross ing 
disp'a>al 
di» po set 
ig no ble 
importer 
im Bold en ' 
dis cio ser * 
com po n^nt 
dp po nent ] 
con do lehce 



Hie first aiod sdeodci idogy the other s^ort. 



cor ro sive 
6p po sirig ' 
com pb ser 
ton troll er 
oc tofjer 
con so ler 
sup pQ ^iifig ' 
unbroken 
un iow ard 
un whole some 
up hold ing 
sdp porting 



JeWvBh 
be fore hand 
diploma 
de jtort iaent 
re mote ness 
e lope ment 
depoite^t 
be hold en 



re volt ed 
b^ to k^n 
heto^ic 
be stoM^'ing 
re vo kiog . i 
be moan mg 
de eo imm f 



/ 



re proach fid * 
jpro po iyal * 
fore to ken 
tno ros6 n^s 
pro pd^iig 
provo^ker -i 
more o*veir 
so.'noro^ 



A f^re • said 
a fore time 



decb rolls * 

en do rare Idis po iute 
dis clo rare |cc 



x>m p6 svire^ 



«» 



*ii.3tft Mwruii. 



tM*r'****«^ 



AMERICAN BCaOOL CXA3&"E0PJS, NO. L . | ) ^ 

Yovf^U s^kl diphtbongB, se^^ond unliable as u in mut€» 



al lyjce meiit 
a 9iui[e ment . 
ab^strase ness 
a bn BiYe, 
traducing 
al lu )ing , 
al li) siye 
trans fu sU^g 
as suBQiing 
amumg 
saluting ; 
ac cu ^er • . 
fra du cer 
ae oou tre * .. 



en su ranee 
en du ranee 
per fa mer 
ex clu siye 
pelJu cid ., 
effd sive. 
in hu m^in « 
im pru dene? ^ 
imprudent* 
in duce ment 
in du sive 
in tru sive * 
dif fu sive 
il lu mine^ 
il lu sive 
in fu sive 



dis pu ter 
computer 
con si^ mer 
ab struse neef 
pol lu ted 
ob tru sive 
con du eive 
con clu sjve . 
con els ding 
scor bu ticT^ 
pursuance » 
pur m ant 
sublunar 



pur su mg 
sub du ii^ 
uh,useTul;| 

Th6 4m^ and second long^ ^e otfier short. 



Pem^sral 
re new al 
tribunal 11 
re mov al 1 
re fa ssl 
de miire iiess 
bi tu men |} 

A piass^ meat 
ap par el 



de duce ment 
!de du cing- 
se clu ding 
re fu 5ing 
delusive 
de du oiire 
re du cing 

AU the q^ables short. 

ab stract er 
at tach meat 



re emit ing • 
se cu ring 
e lu diiig 
pre su midg' 
se dii eer 
profuse ne89 
pro du cing 

a part ment 
as sas sin 



t-T 



^k,99,7jlili$99i i.9tliflthn^, X^9fJ^,ui^kW^ liiilirl>«<<ariM 



1/ ! 



lU 

prig maf ic 
dra mat ic 
la^ prac tice 
at tract ire 
af fran cfai^e 
fanatic 
fan tas tic 
ast^ mat ic 
bal sam ic 
ca thar tic * - 
an tare tic 
earcasticf 
a can thus 
a ban don 
as cend ant 
ap pel lant 
ap pend ant 
pa rental 
at tend ance 
ac cept ance 
ma ter nal 
aberrant , . 
Draternal 
at tend ant 
ab ster gent 
as 8€^s8 ment 
trans cend ant 
a mend ment 
an nex ment 



JUVENILE SFEl^UNTG-BOOK. 

ac qtiit ted 
Irans mit ted 



|af feet ed 
as sem ble 



ma Jes tic ,, 
pa thet ic 
an gel ic 
ath let ic 
clan des tine 
at ten* tive 
ap pr<eh tice 
ap pen dix 
af feet ive 
ab erring 
mag net ic 
trans gress or , 
a bet ter 
as sess or 
^ sev er 
ag gress or 
assii^ant 
acquHtal, 
as sist ance 
s^c quit tance 
ad mit taiice ^ 
ma Ue nant * 
bap tis mal 
(Hag nif ic 
pa cif ic 
sa tir ic 
af flict ive 



a bridge ment 
as trin gent 
ac quit ment 
arcn bish op f 
ab scond er 
<^t ^p tries 
ac com plish 
ad mon ish . 
a bol ish ' 
as ton ish - 
a cros lie 
ac knowl edge 
a dopt ed 
la con ic 
a quat ic 
siir sol id 
a bun dance 
ad journ ment 
an 6th er 
con tract or ^ 

• ■ 

prog nos tiQ 
com pact oew 
command ment 
quad rat ic 
organic! 
ail then tic X 
for ten tous X ' 



»,im.ufktr. 



tl»I«rL»ikfl» 



tt.%t«i 



^ 



AMERICAN SCfiOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. L 115 



Gon vers' ant 
cos met ic * ^ 
cbri cep tive 
con tent ed 
com pl^ ness 
whet ev er 
cor rect or 
ob serv er 
po5 s^ss or 
com melit er 
can ver ging 
con vers ihg 
convelrsive 
com men cing 
col lect ing 



con cern mg 
con ccn trie 
coir rect ive 
of fcn sive 
con firm ing 
of fend er 
con temn ^r 
eon centre 
confessor 
con cres tjence 
con tin gent 
com mit meht 
em pan nel 
em oar rass 



em bat tie 
en am el 
entangle 
en chant m^t 
ex act ness 
em phat ic * 
ex am ine 
ex tat ic 
en'raf ish 
en san guln^ 
ex pans ive ' 
ex pect ance : 
ex pect ant 
et ter hal 

lieu ten ant t 
per verse ness 

ex cres cence 

en circle ' 

eip hez zle 

ex pert ness 

embellish 

ex ten sive 

ex cess ive ; 

ex press ive 

e:^ cept ive 

ex f^ept ing 

ef feet ive* 



ec cen trie 



ex am pie 

en camp iherrt 'per cep tive 



when ev er 
ex chequ er 
sep tern ber 
enfetter 
en ven om 
en vel op 
en deav our 
per sist ance 
ex ist ence 
enkindle 
en rich fneht 
ex bib it 
em pir ic 
ex tin gui^ 
per mis sive 
en clitics 
ex pli cit 
el lip sis 

en cum brance' 
en com pass 
en cour age 
ef ful gence 
ef fill gent 
ex pul sive 
ex curs ive 
infanta 
in val id 



• gbiif. 



fin 



H6 



WVEKILG SPpJUNGrBOOK. 



gym nas tic 
^rim ai kin / 
in ac tive 
mis man age 
did fran cbi^e 
dis tiract e4 
im pas ^iye 
mis car riage 
echis mat ic 
dis as trous 
dis as tfir . v 
jnft^s^^ailit, 
in ter naL 
in ten4 apt 
in fer nal 
in trench ^en^ 
im pend ent 
impellent . 
interpret 
invest mcfi^t 
quin tes seijce 
in clem ,ent 
in fleet ed ^ 
in, feet ^d 
in de&t ed 
im per feCt 
dish ev, -1 
dis sem bje , 



dis cem ment pi trin sic 
dis cred it dis tin guish 



disrelish 
hys ter ic 
in tes.tine 
in tent ive 
in vent ive 
in feet iv^ 
in ceptive 
in cen tive 
di^ cern ing 
bis, sex til^ . 
in her it 
in trep \d 
syn tbet ic 
in vec tive 
inspector 
in vent or 
mis repic on 
dis tern per 
dis sept er 
in dig nip.nt 



dis, tinct ive 
inciyjl 
in hib it 
in spir It 
di^ til ler 
im pri^ on 
di5 Aon est 

immodest 
irx solvent; 
im prop eir 
im pos tor 
di* npn our 
dis turb ance 
in ctim bent 
in due tive 
in dul gence 
im pul sive 
in jus tice 
dis burse ment 
di^ June tive 



in fringe ment in struct ive 

vin die tive 

in-sipid 

il li:; cit 

in fliiit ive 

im pU" cit 

;in stinct ive 



dis cour a^ 
in cum her 

in strqctep 
dis cov er . 
disturber 
dis com fori 



1 



AMpRIjCAN l^^f^OOI. CLASS-BOOK, 790. 1. i 11 



Ais g^sasl' ful t 
dis trust ful 
mis trust ful 
cor rapt ness 
au tun^ nal * 
uii daunt ed | 
un guard ^d 
^ur pass iug 
un fest en 
lin rav el 
un tha^k ful t 



um bi^^l la 
un plea^ ant 

un health ful t 
un fet ter 

unerring 
ungentle 
sur ren der 
sue eess ar 
sub sist mice 
sub mis sive 
un will ing 



unskilfpll ^ 
noc tur,nal ? 
com puf)C tiye 
con cur rei^t 
con duct or 
con struct iye . 
con June ti-^e 
con cus «ive , 
con yul aive 
con smmi tiye 
com ]^idsive 



The first long, the otlier^ fthort^. 



De tach' ment 
be spat ter 
e las tic 
me tal ac 
i ma" gine 
me chan ic Jj 
pe dan tic 
sci at ic . 
here af ter 
be span gle* , 
de can ter 
re gard less 1 
de part ment 
de pend aiice 
dileinma 
de fend ant 



de scend ant 
re «em blai^ce 
re vei»s al 
e ter nal ' 
dependant 
re mem branch 
re hears al 



de tef ihine 
me the^ lin 
de fence less 
resemble 
se ques ter 
e lector 
de fend ei* 



de pend ent de vet op 



pre fer ment 
pre ^ent ment 
e lev en ^ 
re fresh ment 
re *ent ment 
e m§r gence 
re trenct ment 
e led ed 



di rect or 
de tern hef 
pre cep tor' 
pre tend er 
pre ^er ver 
remember 
re fleet or 
de ^rt er , 



•*'iat 1 tifl* IwMd. 






.\ 



T .- --i — 



<- *■: 



118 



jqVENlLE SPELLmG-BOOK. 



de tect' er 

de mer it 

e met ic 

ffie cep tiye 

^e crep id 

de feot ive 

de fens^ive 

re t'entive 

repleni«h 

re plev ih 

re spect ive 

ne gleet fill j} 

re #eut fu{ 

re spect ful 

re venge ful 

c nig. ma 

^ re ^kt arice 

. beginjriing . 

di min ish 

re lin q^uish 

re mit merjt 

e quip ment 

de Un quent 

re;*ist less 

remiss ness 

... 
e ii,\ ir 

re km die ^ 

c4i"cit ; 

€ dip tic 

■ II I J ' * ' X ^ ■ Ml I ■ 



e pis tie 
spe cif ic 
de scrip tiye 
de liv er 
he wil der 
be gin ner . 
pre diet or 
re mon stranee 
de pcw' ite 
sy tiopris ' 
de spot ic 
de mol ish 
be long ing 
re dun dance 
re pug nance 
re luc tance 
re pur chase 
re cuFTence 
re ful gence 
de struc tiye 
di vul fijfng 
re public 
be com ing 
pre simp tive 
1*^ cov er 
di dac tic 
ty r9.nnic*, 
di op t^ca . 
qui e» cjent 



tri urn phant f 
di ur nal 
ho lan pa 
mo nas tic 
pro tract or 
rd man cer 
scfao ias tic I 
CO hab it 

So lem ic 
o m'es tic 
fore tel ^er * 
pro gross ive 
pro jec tile 

pwo photic t 
pro spec tive 
CO cr cive 
no vcm ber 
mo men bus 
pro ject or 
to gexH er 
pro bib it 
86 H" cit 
prolific 
pro du,c tivc 
lore run por 
neu mat icfs 



y 

rhexx mat ic J[ 
pu is sant 
stu pen dous 



ifk»»t.- 



i^u^ 



-r'-t- 



H «. I,9tfl. Ml4 



AMERICAN SCHOOL ei/AS$&«BOOK; NO. 1. l^^i 

AU-tiiesyUaUie^ki^. '• * 



Po ta' to 



!»»,• 



Sedately* 
se rette iy • 
se rere ly 
re mote \y* 



Pro vi *o 

M (Corely 
di viae ly 
be nijTi ly- 
pro fane: ly 



pro ce diue 



.♦ « 



po litje ly 
ro faseiy 
[lu mane ly ^ 
liu preme»ly 



I 



As sem' blage 
al ter tiadb 



The two first short, the other Ion*. 



in cul cate 
il Ills trate 



ap pen dUge » ex cul pate 



a p<5s tate 
in car nate f 
ex tir pate 
im pr.eg nate 
dis fijgf ure • 
im press ure 



con ruminate 
con fis cati^ 
con den sate 
cbn telin plate 
in dent xxte 
in pronifp tu!^ 



con ceri Irate ' 
stil et to 
at trib ute 
ad vent ure 
en rapt ure * 
con*tin ue 
dis tribute ' 
im pdst hume 
bis for tune j 



' > 



1 

Thefirst short, the others 1<^. . 



Vn ^in' ly * 
un ^e ly . 
bal CO iiy 
un ho ly t^ 
com pl6te 1^ 
ex treipe ly. 



sip ceK ly. 

im pvgre ly 
un seem ly 
uneaqr 
un wiel dy 
inquiry 



tin wi^e lys 
un time ly . 
pn likely. # 
unkindly , 
sub lime ly 
bnduly 



Ex act' V 
as sem my 

diB tintt ly 



Thft two fijvt flfaor^ the Iwt long. 



r-i. 



titi dean ly 
in tense ly 
ban dit ti 



It. I ■ 



* f utiaat. 






com opt tee 
un friend ly 
un god ly 



^•"■^•^— ■•"■ 



tt^fttflUtt^ 



The mia4le short, tlvrOthets long. 

De pwCubr? |de jnct are . le ner v^ 
di vest ure {project ure . (me men to 



De &o!t' er 
de fraiid er 
rewiard mg^ 

TTie 

Ac count' imt 
a cou sties 
avowal 
ten coun ter 
en coun ter 
endowment 
tm pow er 

em bowel 
ac courft ing ^ 
iil low ing • 
ex pound ing 
dis count \ng 
mis count ed 
lin found ed 
^x pound ed 
eon found ed 
«n bounded 
im <^louded 



de noui) eer |e nqr.mDW 
de stroy er ' > pro noun cki^ 
de vourer {pro found ae£»8 

broad, the qtiien ibort. 

in thral meat 
im mortal 
con focm ist^ 
in stal meat 
a noint ed 
a void ance 
ap point ed 
em ploy er 
en join meirt 
en joy ment 
em broid er 
con cord aace 
coniform iat 
ac cord ance 
adorning 
tarpauliqg 
un law fill 
sub al terfi 



un ground ed 
un sound ed 
ab hor rence 
ab or tive 
ab sor bent 
ac cord^ 
ap plaud er 
per form er 
fex tort er 
in form er 
ex liaust less 
disorder 
disGordince 
endonK^ ment 
per forsb uice 
k port ant 
in&rmant 



Caravan' 
ctntradict 



did cord ant 

Hie' a«reiil tia VbA^ Buyable. 

Idis con tept Idis con cerjt 
|m correct * jdi» affect^ 



AMERICAN BCHOOL eLASS.B06H> NO. I. 131 



dls pos se&s' 
dis com mend 
rec oUect 
ep au let * 
.rec om mend 
dis an nul 
ia ter nipt 



in ter mix 
in ier mit 
in t^r diet 
in t€i*cept 
in ex pert 
in ter sert 
in ter sect 



'm 



in ter sperse 
effervesce - 
in dis linct 
dis in ter 
un def stand 
coun ter mand 
coun ter act 



The two first riiort, the last long 



Sev en teetl 
ref et^ee 
in dil( creet 
fin an cier • 
brigadier 
in va lid w 
dis a gree 
rep ar tee 
grenadier 

Sal an quin 
eb au ehee * t 
man da rin 
cap & pie 
tarn barine 
vol un teer 
dom in eer 
in cdm i^lete 
magazine 



ab 'Ben tee 
ffaz.et teer 
Jnterxede 
in t«ii fere 
in ter v^ene 
dis ap pear 
mis con ceive 
un der neaxH 
to der rate 
on der take 
en ter tain 
lemon ade 
dis' en gage 
dis ar range 
gas eoB'ade ' 
inas q^i^t ade 
ambuscada 
ap per tain 



quar an tiMi| . cav al- cade 



pal; eti tee 



un der mine 



in terjme 
al am«de 
discompofft 
im por tuse 
am a tear 
in com mode 
dis com mode 
in dis ^l>^e. 
dis em bogue 
un der go 

in der stood || 
dis ap prove 

ig a dfHm 
und^riQok 
aftei^noon 
mis m fonn % 

disappdint 
dis at low 
dis a Vow 



l [ I I - - -- ' ' I I ■ I l«»ll I ■ H I <l 

t^vii. >«,lv»-*«^ U»*#«VJ-«*» .t«,5vV*^ 



122 



JOVEJULE SPELLUfO-BOdt. 



1 ' 



Deb najlr' 
dis ol)ey 
dis o blige 
dis u nij,e 
er u dite 
1 ef u gee 

O vertmtii 
o vcrnm * 
o ver eomiB 
ovei*«dst 
CO alestxe' 



The first short, the others loiig;^ 



[devotee 
in tro duc^i 
mis be have 
as si fi^nee 
bat ri cade 
idhan de Iter^' 



ob H gee 
tin be lief 
dis e steem' 
pet- se vette . 
dis be Ki^f 
mis de m^an 



* • ft 

I'he Urst long, the others short. 



o ver bair^ 
p ver, match 
o verstoek 
o ver istahd* 
p ver pMss , 



ov^set. 
\ ver spread 
o ver wheha 
o ver i^oi^ . 
overjoy 



The middle long, the others sborti 



Ap pre bend' 
com pre hend 
rep iTmand. 
ac ^ui esc^ 



con de scend 
com plai sajice 
in di rect 



Cor re spond ' [pic tu resquc 



rep re ^eiit 

et i quette 

man u mil 



Tli0 iQiddle dioitty tiie dtos'loD^/ 



Su per 6cribe' 
aup^rftiie 
8u per vi^e 
Bu jper $)^di» 
o ver prize • 
overhear • 
o ver si$^ v.. 
o ver ft^h • 



•A'tfilC 



*' T 



6 ver fead 
6 ver rate 
o ver atraii) 
o v«r weijarA 

6 ver shade 

overlook! 
6 ver took 

■W ■» H I ■ ■! 



o ver shoot 
9 ver rule 
o ver i^vge 
o ver hale. J 
o ver aw^ % 
o ver throw. 
6 ver grow 
overborn 



<*■*< 



l^tvLbmd^ 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CIASS-TOOK^ NO. I. 123 



'^iS^Thm lf«nMr, whtm Mm to f«»4 teltf*Hy^ tod tptltt «orfMC()r dw woHl la • dHMfcri Ibnn, 
the pH4e*|»l •(wlliof ilMNiid bt Atrtg oMspMltiM ; ChM lli, Wdrdit |» Aiy mmv ia Hi* f t«4Un|; iMWiHb 
They ihwe Bitct. tbaiB ia tba orJar dUy im than, aad |^ am aoawraej ia (ha thart aa watt aa Of 
Iaok word*. It haa fiMa footid ffotti mwhlta, Aat f iaaaa to flaaa lad f!ailv-««Miii 
waOfcrifiaUiaf. aafcrraadiof lanaoB. ' 

- ON SPBJNQ. 

All nature shows. 

In various views, 
Her great Creator's praise. 

The birds all sing, 

While on their wingi 
In soft and fileasing lays. 

The trees look g^j. 

And seem to say» 
There is a God above, * , . 

The 6Qn!s bright beaimii . 

The liquid streams, 
Say we are rul'd by love. 

The bleating flocks, 
With happy looks, ; ^ 

Say Gdd deigns us to feed; 
Without his power, 
There's not an hdur, ' 

Biit we should comforts jieed. 

And if the herds, :. 

And trees and birds. 
All join, to prakye^ God!a name, 

It mi|»tDot be, " 

That suc^ as we, 
Reiiisa to4o the samear^ 



\ 



124 JUVENJLE SPEI^mG-BOpKk 

progressive. 
B« virtuous and you will be happy. 
Heneniber a kifitliie«s,aa4 be gratelul. ' 
' Never censure those who try to do well. 
By others' fiiults ive should c^rect our own. 
She who studies her gUuis jQeglecj^ her heart. . 
Be not pi*6ud j it-is odious-to God and man. 
Truth is the brightest .ornanicnt of youth. 
"Wish not for that which you cannot obtain.^ 
Wisdom is* the solace of human life. 
£Aiak^ off &loth i it is an enemy to youth. 
Honest persons are seldom destitute of friends 
If you disoblige {^hers,tiley will disoblige you 
It'is i^n h(K}our.to b^riend tJie dtsti^essed. 
The tear of sympa&y bringi iti own relief 
Hopc^ ift tiU! "never-failing frle^ ttf man. 
Tirtue is otit- gttide to hikf^ess m high. 
Piety coiM^fitteB our highest fi&rtiily happiness. 
NoAing is ioertictn in this ^nc^rtain world* 
Poverty and shame await the ^lodifuU 
Cherish aentimemts of charity towards all mea 
Young persons should &otbepi^d>gal of time. 
Avmd all pccaaioii^ of being ai>gfy. 
Anger rests only in the bosom of ibols^ 
Would you be happy wltliin yourself? 
Would you be respected by youblfriends i 
Would ytM, be beloved by. your iftlaker ? 
BelM^^ksBtf behumbk^be.VirtunaSft ' 
A mau is knowa by the C(ni|M0y he keeps. 
Be good in gi'eotoess, ind pf^t in goodness. 
That man k Mewwd wtio feass tii« t^i$ 



t' 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASB^OOS;, NO. L 124» 

Child of ^mmer, lovely Rose, 
In thee what blushing beauty glows $ 
But ere to-tnorrow's setting sun. 
Thy beauty fades; thy form is gone. 
Yet though no grace thy buds retain, 
Thy pleasing odours still retnain. 
Ye fair, betimes this moral prize : 
*Tis lasting beauty to'be wise. 

TO A FLY. ^ 

Ti»6 fly 4bout Ihe candle gay . 

Dances with thoughtless hum ; 

Bui short, alu* ! WsgMdy play, ' 

His pleasure proves his doom. 

The dritd in such ajimpHcity 

About the bee-hive clings; ' . 

And i*ith ont drdp of hon«y to 

Receives a thousand stings. 

Busy, curious, thirsty fly> • k 

IMnk with me^ a»d d^ak aAl* 

Freely welcome to my eiip». 

Cottld8t4lit>tt sip wd «|)^il«|(. 

Make the most of life jmmtifi * . ; ' • 

Life is sheet ami weMrs a^i^* 

Both alike are mine aiid. Ai|ie# 

Hast'ning qitiek to thmi: decline e 

Thine's a suminef , mtn^'a nci niore^ 

ThaagH repeated tor threescore 1 

Tki%esGoi:e6unimeis^wii0ii{h»y't:ef99i^ . . 

Will agyear as short as one. 



126 juv^nij: BPExxufo-BCKn:* 

, No conditioa in life is ao secure m not to admit of 
change. 

Neyer sport wi& pun or dlatress in any of your amuse' 
mentc 

Be alwajs ready to assist sitch penmis as re^re. tby 
assistance. 

We should be more i;e4d j to ficHrgive tbanito return an 
injury.' 

When we are told of a faidt^i we shoold e9?r ^ to 
an4d it afterwards. 

Do not insult the po^or f poverty entitlei a loim^ j^ty 
rather than insult. . . 

A kind word, ^nay^ leven a kind look^ often aibnts emap , , 
fort to the afflicted. 

Neith^ time nor misfc^tune shojild ^rasf ^^remem- 
hranoe of a friend. 

A good man has a tended conpem for the h^ifinees of 
those around him. . 

Despise not any naat^s cotiditioR» lest it ha^ype^^ at a 
fiiture time, to be thy own. 

Envy not the ^ipeara^o <^ happiness ui any man : yoo 
know not his secret griefiu 

- Do^ much gpoAn» yam tm to aU mankind ; to youv 
enemm as well as fiiends^ 

. A kind action g^ves pleasure botik to ourselves and t6 
those to whom we are kind. 

. He whoi$ devoid rfsympaiiiy» is iBcapafale of enyoying 
.one of the greatest Iwranriea of ^. 

Never whisperHn company $ it is a mark of loir brwdl» 
fegi and an iwdt l»tiioe^ wfao^aie pctsent 



•. •»■ 






• AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOO*, NO. L 127 

THE mouse's PETITION. 

- • • 

Hh hear a pensive pristmisr's pnijer, 

Fur tibcrtjr that sig(i$ $ 
And never ]at til J heai-t be sfatti 

Against the wretch's cries ! 

For here forlorn aitd sad I ait 

Withm the wirj grate ; 
Anil tremfate at tii* aptiroaehing mom; 

Which brings impemling fate. 

*^ If e'er thy breast wi<li freedom glow'di 
And spurnM a tyrant's chain. 
Let not thy strong oppressive force 
A freeborn mouse detain. 

Oh do not stain with guiltless blood « 

Til J hospitable hearth. 
Nor triumph that thy wiles betray 'd 

A prize so little worth. 

The 8[rattercd gleanings of a feast 

My frugaLnieals supply, 
But if thine unrelenting heart •* ^ .. 

That slender boon deny j 

The cheerful light, the' vital air, 

Are blei^sings widely given I 
Let nature's commoners enjoy 

The common gifts of heaven. 

The well^tauglit philosophic mind ^ 

To all cumpassion gives $ ^ . 

Casts round thj^ world ai> equal trft 

And feels for all that Uvea. 

M 



\ 



126 KYEms: .SFEULlirC^BOOK. 

DIVINE PROVIDENCB, 

The glorious sun is set in 'IfKe west ; the night-dews 
fall ; ;ind the air» wluch was sultry^ beootiies cool. ' 

' ' • * 

The flowers fold up tlieir coloured leaves 5 thej fold 
themselves up^ and hang their heads on the slender stalk. 

The chickens are gathered imder the wings of the hen, 
and ai*e at rest : the hen herself is at rest also^ » 

The little hirds have ceased their warbling; they are 
asleep on the boughs, each one with his head behind his 

wmg. 

< 

There is no murmur of bees around the hive, or amoBg^t 
the honeyed woo<i(>ines; they have done their work^ and 
they lie close in their wf xen cells. Tlie sheep reat upon 
their soft fleeces, and their loud bleating is no more heard 
amongst the hills. 

Tliere is no sound of a number of voices, or of children 
at play, or the trampling of busy fi^et, and of people hur- 
rying to and fro. The smith's hammer is not heard upon 
tiie anvil ; nor the harsh saw of the carpenter. 

All men are stretched on their quiet beds; and the 
clikild sleeps upon the Ji>reast of its mother. Darkness is 
spread over the skies, and darkness is upon tiie ground; 
every eye is shut, and every hand is still. 

^ . ■ 

Who takes care of all peo|^ whm they are sunk in 
sleep ; when Ifaey cannot de&nd theniieiTU» nor ate when 
danger approaches ? 



ABIERICAN BCiaOOL CLASStBQOKr NO. I. 129 
There is an eye that never sleeps $ there is an eje 
that sees in the dariL night, as well asiin the bright san- . 
shine. 

When there' is no light of the sun, oi of the moon ; 
when there is no lamp in the house, nor any little star 
twinkling through the thick clouds ; that eye' sees every 
where^iH all places, and watches continually over idl the 
families of the ear^. 

The ^ye tliat sleeps not is God^s $ his hand ts always 
stretched out over us. He made sleep to refresh us, 
when we are weary ; he made night, tliat we might sleep 
in quiet. 

As the mother movef about the house with her finger 
on her lips, and stills every little noise, that her infant be 
not disturbed } fts she draws the curtains around *its bed, 
and sfiuts out the light from its tender eyes; so God 
draws the curtains of darkness around ns j lie makes all 
things to be hushed and still, that his krge family ma|^ 

sleep in peace. 

\ .... 

Labourers spent with toil, and young children, and 
every little humming insect, sleep quietly; for God 
'\(atches over you. You may sleep, for he never sleeps : 
you may close your eyes in safety, for his eye is always 
«pea to protect you. ^ 

When the datkness is passed awiay, and the beams of 
the morning sun strike through your eyelids, begin the 
day with praiskig' God, who has taken care of you througli 
^<rni^t: be tli^akfal to bm^ for he is yoiirheiivenly 
Father. \ 



130 JUVEHHiE SFELUN6.BOOC. 

Flowers, vhen jtm open t^^D, spreail jcwr le&yts and 
•mell ftweet t«.hi« phaae \ Biitld, whea yoa awake, warble 
jour than^ amenggt the green boughs ! sing to liim before 
yoa sing to joor mates. 

Let his praise be in ^r hearts iivlien i^e lie down ; 
let his praise be on oar lips, when we awake. To him let 
us bow in humble submission, for the many mercies we 
receive ; he is our Gond $ he is our heavenly Father. . 

TIME. ^ 

Time destroys all tilings. Tliere i^ nothing in Ais 
world which must not, sooner or later, submit to his 
stroke $ none so strong as to resist him, none so cttiming 
as to evade his power. 

Yet time steals on us, as it were, unseen t tiie days^ 
the months, the years roll on ; and we content ourselves 
with sayings H Time passes/' without thinking thsjt our 
time also paises with it^ and «that each moment brings us 
nearer to the gravje. 

Let us* therefore mark each day with some act ^ good- 
ness or virtue^ that our names may live when we ourselves 
are no morer 

^ How many are there amongst us who are for ever 
crying out against the shortness of time, and yet do not 
blush witli the same breath to complain thait ihdr time 
Kangs heavy on their lumds, and ^at they know not how 
to employ it. 

But what an idle complaint is this! Any good and wise 
man will find that he may use hia 4inte to the glory ot 
God 9 the service of lus country and friends^ or in some 
way er other, for the gaod ot manktud. 



X 



amehk:: A^ ^hoql ct ass-book, no. i. 1 3 1 

soAift)w, 

Beneath $ome hoaiy mountain 

PII lay me do4rn to weepy 

Or near $ome wurblmg fountain 

Bewail vinyself asleep. 

Wlieije featherM choirs combining . 

With gentle murm'ring streams^^ 

And windaln concert joining, 

|t^uie sadly pleasing dreams. 

THE BLIND BOT^ 

say, what is that thing ^all'd Ught^ 
Which I must ne'er enjoy ? , ' 

What are the blessings of the sight i 
tell a poor blind boy ! 

You talk of wondrous things you see^ 
You say the sun shines bright: 

1 fe^l him warm^ but how can ^ 
Or make it day or night ? 

My day .or night myself I majLe^ 
. Whene'er I sleep or play ; 
And could I always keep awak6^ 
Widi me 'twere always day. 

With heavy si^s I often hear 

You mourn my hapless we; - 
But sure vqA patien.ce I can bear 
' A loss I ne'er can know. . , ' 

Then let not what I cannot have 

^y cWi- of mind destroy; 
Wfiile tiius I sing, I^m a khigt 

Jd^O^gb II poor Uind boy. 



132 ^ JmnSNILfi sr£LLfN0.BO(ML 

tieo, Mon, attd cea% -^ - •> *. iace«toi. 

tiooi, 8000% scioiu, and clooiiy « • UkB^im*^ 

scieocft^ and tiancet • . . - . • like jift^tur* 

tial,andcial| - ^ • . . , • •' iSikitshal. 

sier, and tittf, • • - ^* '- . • lik«s:/iiir. 

« 1oii| preceded lrfi^n,6rje^ - - * 

The accent on Hie ftnt tyllabte. 
The flnt sylUibfo loqg^. 



Fa' tient 
8ta tion 
an cient 
pa tiencfe 
spa cious 
gra eious 
gra zicr 
na tioii 
bra sxer 

Frac'. tion 
anx ious 
cap tious 
cap tion 
man sion 
fac tion 
ac tion 
ax iom 
sane tion 
fac tious 
bas tion 
val lant 



N 



sa viour 
ckur ion 
a lien 
dpe cious 
spfe cie* 
seignior 
no tion 
iTiQ tion ' 
lo tion 

The first syllable shorU 

j spaniel 
as sion 
ex ion 
ten sion 
vcr sion 
pen sion 
sec tion 
mersion 
pre''cioiis , 
ces sion 
men tion 
iiye" cial 



per ti<ai 
o «ier 
o cean 
potion 
so cial 
cIoTH ier 
sol dier 
quo tient 
iu sioti 

2ae8 turn 
c tion 
4ic lion 
fric tloQ 

^ bil ious . 
trillions 
|4n ion 
min ioQ 
mill ion 

>piU ion 
tri V ial 
filial. 



i • 



AMERICAN SCH90L CLASS-BOOK, NO. f. 



133 



bilf iaords 
misston 
vi^ ion 
vi" cious 
mar tial * 
par tial 
cau tioust 
iiau seous t 



(^mi iioa 
€oi» scienee 
epon sion ' 
colt ier 
poll iard 
moll ieiit 
nox iou9 
nup tual 

The accont on th^ second «yUable. 
AU the s^^bles ^rt. 



fus tiao , 
imc tion 
ruffian 
flux ion 
cull ion 
scuU ion 
func tion 
trunn iom 



Ab strac' tion 
attraction 
trans ac tion 
af fee tion 
trans grea sion 
as cen sio^ : 
tra j w tion 
as ser tion 
ac ces sion 
ac cep tion 
at teti tioa 
af flic tion 
par ti tion 
tra di 4ton 
ca pri cigua 
ab ms slm 
ad sm sion 
ag ni tion 
ar& ion 



am bi tious 
am bi tion 
at tri tion. - 
ad di tion 
fac ti^tious ' 
flagitious 
ma li cious 
pa tri cian 
tran scrip tion 
trans mis*sion 
tran si tipn 

!>a yilion 
a mil iar 
ma gi cian 
au 9pi cious t 
tra diip tion 
as svmp tion 
ex pan sjion 
tex trac tion 



per di tion 
ef fi cic^t 
per ni cious 
in ac tion 
in fra^ tion 
did pas sion 
dis trac i\Km 
mil i tia 
in ci^' ion 
in i tial 
mift pri^ ion 
sil 1 cious. 
dis tine tion 
if^ic tion 
in flic tion 
ex tine ti<|n 
dis per sion 
im mer sion 
in ten tioD 



-*«■ 



»%i«Li*J»ftr, 



t •, . ijl, Itr^irf^ 



134 



JUVimiA SPEIJ^Ifd-BOCHC. 



in fee' tion 
im pree sion 
in ver sion 
dia sen ticm 
in yen tion 
in fiec tion 
in fee tious 
dis ere tion 
ex ten sion 
Ben ten tious 
ex eep tion 
ex pres Bibn 
es sen tial 
ex tor tidn f 
dis tor tion * 
ex pul sion 
ex eur siori 
per ver.sion 
jKtr fee tion 
m eur sion 
in stnie tion 
injunction' 
im pnl sion 
im pdr tial ^ 
bat tdl ion ^ 
sub ti*ae tion 
Bdb^tan tial 
siieeies sion 



sus p^) sion 
sup pres sion 
sub jee tion 
^ub ver sion 
com pan ion 
con trac tion 
com pas sion 
con eep tion 
con ten tion 
con ten tious 
col lee tion 
con ces sion 
eon ven tion 
op pre^ sion 
con ver ^ion 
com plex ion 
con f^ sion 
po^ ^es sion 
con n^x ion 
ob jet tion 
eon fee tion 
cor rec tion 
com pres sion 
com mer eia} 
eon strue tion 
cor riip tion' 
con Tiu sion 
con j^nc tion 



eon cus sion 
eon sump tion 
com pul sicm 

Ob BtrUG tioDt 

com bus tion 
col Ms ion ^ 
com mix ion 
com tnis. sion 
con di tion 
con tri tion 
con scrip tion 
of fi cious 
con vie tion 
om nis cious 
cog ni tion 
con viv ial 
pos till ion 
of fi cial 
solstitial 
sub scrip tion 
sus pi eious 
sus pi cion 
sub mis sioD 
suf fi eient 
ob nox ious 
eon tor tion 
kh sOrp tion . 
h dop tion 



mi^m 



*?■ 1 1' 



♦ -^ 



••i9«ihMi. 



t*.3«l.«i{aft«. 



AMKitiCAN I^H00t> CLASS^BOC^ NQ. L 13^; 

The £nt sliofty the imddleioBg'* 



Gra da' lion 
plan ta tton 
ab lation 
sal va tion 
trans la tion 
fal la cibus 
tax a tion 
ra pa cious 
va ca tion 
car na f ion 
sa ga, cious 
stagna tiou 
oc cation 



oblation 
foun da tion* 
au da cious f 
vex a tiotis 
vex a tion 
ces sa tion 
sen sa tion 
im pa tienc^ 
ed be «ion 
fa ce tious 
in henon 
a tro clods 
com motion 



corromn 
ex plo ^ion 
dis ploBon 
al hi ^ion 
con cjIu siot^' 
con fu ^i^n 
commia nic^n 
pol lu ticHn 
iMu «ion 
in fusion 
effii^oa 
ex clu sitm 



■t 



pul sa tion 

The first ^d second lon^, the laat Ihort 

Do na' tion |pro fu ^rion 

de vo tioa 
feroei0t» , 
!^ mo tion 
re mo tion 
t^ na oious 
e va ^ion 
re la tion 
le ga tion 
yi va ciouit 
be ha yiour 
p qua tion 
ere a tion . 



lo ca 4i<Mi 
no ta tion * 
vo ca ti#n 
proba ti<m 
qno ta tion 
ro tation 
lo qua cioQS 
o ra tiori 
TO raqiou^ 
pr<| ma ti^n 
pro por tion 
CO he ^ion 



M ga tipn 
li ba tion | 
yi bra tion 
pri va tion 
ci ta tion 
va ca tipn 
sa na tipn 
secretion 
re pie tion 
se clu jioQ 
de lu 5ion 
e tru «on 
pro fu jion 



fp 



• ovMfafomd. 



\»%l kV Inroad. 



^ i M fal fiut. 



1&6 



73i« fintl<Mi^, the otNft short 



De trac' tion 
re ac. tion 
de jec tion 
f)re einp tion 
"pro due tion 
pro vin cial 

Se M tion; 
e ri^ Ion 
de ci^ ion 
4i Yi^ ion 
re mis fiion 
e li^ ion 
pre di ion 
edi tion 
e mi& sion 
re Bei^ 3ion 
de fi cicfnt 
de scfitr tion 
reti^on 
religioiis ^ 
ci vil Jan ' - 
80 di tioh 
se di tioua ' 
de li. doUB 



pre scrip tion 
^Restriction * 
de tension, 
pre vention 
pre teai sion 
ere dential 
e lee tion 
re d^nu) tion 
retenuon 
de ^er tion 
reflexion 
direction - 
de dien sion 
de cep tion 
se lee tion 
re bell ion ' 
dices lion' 
xe beBF ions 
ce les tial 
re ver sion 
li cen tious * 
'po ten tial 
pro gres sion 



pro tec; tion 
mis sion 
lo ffi ci$m . 
vpli ti<Hi 
provision 
pro pi tious 
po « tion / 
pro fi cient 
pru den tiai 
fru i tion 
|u di cial 
ju di ddM 
ma ^i ciaa 
mu ni tion 
i*e pul sioa 
e rnp^ tion 
se due tion 
e mul &ion 
de du6 tion 
pre ^Dfip'tfen 
re vul sioi]i * 
ce due 'tion 
resi^khptibn 
de struc tion 



pro fes sion 

Worda of ibar iQrUablei, with the accent on i& first 

A' mi a ble Ijq di ca ture lap i da ry 
Ta ri a ble a vi a ry plan e ta ry 

hi mi na rj ||td mi ral tj han iz&ry 

^mmm—^-mmmmm, r "l > i i.i ■■ m ,ii ■ ■ » ■ ■ .m i ■ l' ,m 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BQ(^ NO. I. 1^ 



ar bi tra ry 
ag ri cul tore 
ac ri mo ny • 
al le go ry 
al i mo ny 
tran si to>y 
pat ri mo ny 
mat ri mo n/ 
par si mo ny 
an ti mo ny 
ar chi tec ture 
epilepsy 
negligently 
em I nent ly 
em i nen cy 
el e gapt.fy 
mercenary 
del i ca qy 
sec re ta ry 
scm i na ry 
el e g^cy 
ef fi ca cy 
tes ti mo ny 

cer 9 moxij 
envi^ouBiy 
temparfbry 
mil i ta ry ; 
in tri pa cy 
in ti mac J 



criminally , 
crit i cal ly 
dif jficulty 
i^ nq rant ly 
sm gu lar ly 
im p& dm ly . 
trib q ta ry 
ob sti -na cy 
sol i ta ry 
nom i nal ly 
drom e 4a ry 
prod, i gal. ly 
cor di al ly . 
or di na ry 



grad ually 
obduracy 
con tu ma cy : 
con tu me ly 
op u len cy 
sub se quent ]f 
pul mo na ry 
sump tu a ry 
sublu na rj 
pune tu al hr 
tur bu lent ly 
nav i ga ble 
charitable 
am i ca ble 



cop se quent ly^ ad mi lia ble 



com pe.ten cy 
con ti nen cy , 
au di to ry 
or thp e py 
ap o plex y 
ig no mi ny 
con trq ver sy 
cor ol la ry 
sal u ta ry 
stat u a ry " 

bat u ral ly 
sanctuary 

|an u a 
annu 



\ 



ary . 
ally 



ap pb VifiL ble 
habi table 
pal li a tive 
val u a ble 
pen e tra ble 
ve ^e ta ble 
es ti ma ble 
e qui ta ble 
ex pli tea bla 
des pi ca ble 
ex pii ca (are 
rev o ca ble 
rep n ta ble 
spec u la trre 
(sem i dr de^ 



138 



JUV£rai4E SPELUNG-BOOK. 



S 



it' i a ble 
is pu - ta ble 
fig. u ra tive 
nom i na tive 
cor ri^i ble 
bos pi ta ble 
for mi da ble 
cop u la tive 
nu ga to ry 
mu ^ic^al ly 
mo ment a ry 
rea son a. ble 
h&b er daeh er 
tab er ha cle 
anst^r a ble 
pal at a ble 
cat er pil lar 



prefer slbte 
referable 
separ a ble 
vea pr a Ue 
service a ble 
cens ur a ble 
mi^ er a ble 
hou our a ble 
op er a tive 
prof ilW ble 
jtol er a ble 
con tjuer a ble 
vul ner a ble 
com; fort a ble 
pun i&h a bl^ 
ut ter a ble . 
man da to ry 



mar ri«ge a blead ver sa ry 



lam en table 
man age a ble 
^ar don a ble 
ered it a ble 



preb en dary 
dex ter aus ly 
per emp to ry 
ex cei leu cy 
tem per a ture 
sed en ta ry 
em is sa ry 
ex q^i* ite ly 
dila to ry 
in ven to ry 
dif fer ent ly 
fjckis cek la ny 
lit er a tore 
des ul to ry 
prom is so ry 
prom on to ry 
vol un ta ry 
com ment a ry 
com iKOs sa ry 



melancboly^ 
ne ces sa ry < jeom mon al ty 
pref a to ry cus torn ^ ry 
gen fer ous ly jpur ga to ry 



iiTBin, ma ri an 
ab ste.mi ous 
a e li al 
material 
ex pe ri ence 
in^e ni oas 



Accent on the acoond s^lli^lev 



mys te n ous 
im pe ri ous 
in gre di eut 
[cen so ri oua 
er ro ne ous 
en CO mi um 



em po niim 
vie i0 ri ouB 
bis ti> ri an 
ux o ri otts 
uphdlster er 
la bo ri ous 



* ■* ^ — 



*Anik 



■«w<«Mn» 



AMERICAN^HOOL CLAfSB-'BOOKt NO. I. l39[ 



jbar ino' ni ous 
ar mo ri al . 
cor po re al 
op pro bri ous 
com mo dious 



in ca pa b)e 
im mo ta ble 
in cu ra ble 
gram mat i cal 
an tith e ms 



spcm ia ne ous im ped i mient 

1 " *••■. 4»»»i 



ob se qui ous 
pos te ri or 
col'le gi al 
con vewent 
con ze ni al 
gra tu i toi* 
sa iu bri ous 
cir du i tous 
cen tu ri on " 
en tim si ast 
ex u be ranee 
mer cu ri al 
in tu i tire 
lux a ri ous 
un du ti ful 
un Q m al ' 



mdef i nite 

in im i cal 

in del i ble 

millennium {apocrypha^ 



an^elicitl 
sa tir i cal . 
ha bil i meift 
magnificent 
las cir i ous 
am phib i 
fas tid i ous 
a rial y si» 
&nat ici^m 



ir rel e Yant 
sig nif i eant 
in vid i ous 
in qu)^ i tive 
m vin ei ble 
in vi^ i ble 
per fid i ous 
ter res tri al* 
per pet u,al 
ver nac u lar 
effect u al 
per spic u ouS 



com mu ni canA p^n in su la 



con nn bi al 



concapis/rf^uce im pet u ous 



for tu 1 tous 
a me na ble 
ob tain a ble 



m gen u ous 



il lus tri bus 

in dus tri ous 

ex or bi tant 



im pla ca ble ian gel i ca 



T' 



com par a Gv^ 
com pet i tor 
com bus ti ble 
com pen di udl 
con tempt i ble 
com pat i ble 
com par i sou 
con com i tanlT' 
ba rom e ter 
a non y mous 
as tron o mer, 
in con gtu ous 
car niv o reus ' 
con stit u enl - 
ha bit u al 
con tig uoufl 
con spic u ous 
conjeotufal 
om nip o ten! 



tmmmi^ 



■«MwriWM»«iwm^*>«^«M|Fi 



> ■ 



14t) 



JUVENH^E SFELLTKG-BOOK. 



par tic u lar 
ad vent iifrous 
ma lev o lent 
am big a 008 

ex ec u tor ^ 

« 

tern peat u bus 
subservient 
sus cep ti ble 
ne ik ri piis 
pre ca ri ous . 
e gre gi ous 
me lo di o^ 
me mp ri al 
cri te ri on 
li bra ri an 
no tp ri ous 
o be di cut 
e le gi ac 
^y nu ri ous 
ie u ni on 
pe culi ar 
e ma-ci ate 
|>e cu nia ry 
9 till me rate 
ne go ti ate 
pro pi-i c ty . 
so bri e ty 
BO ri e tf 
ebrie ty . 



ere d|i li ty 
se cu ri ty 
fu tu ri ty • 
8u pe ri our 
su per la tive 
pre ^erv a tive 
sy non y mpus 
pre rog a tive 
pre pos ter ous 
vo cif er ou^ 
re cep ta cle 
pre die a ment 
de riv a tive . 
rigin al 
vo lu min ous 
de plo ra ble 
de libber ate 
de gen er ate 
e piph a ny * 
e ter nal ly 
de moc ra cy 
su prem a cy . 
hydrography* 
i ddl a try 
de «pond en cy 
ge og ra phy * 
po lyg a my 
thjB ol o gy 

e con p my 

' '■' ' " ■■ ■ -* 



de pop u late 
e lab o rate 
^ e vap o rate 
pre var i cate 
plu ral i ty* 
neu tral i ty 
fe ro ci ty 
ve lo ci ty 
du pli ci ty 
fe'hci ty 
ti mid i ty 
be at i tude 
ve nal i ty 
de prav i ty 
ve ra ci ty 
de cliv i ty 
ci'vil i ty ' 
di vin i ty 
vi cin i ty 
vi cis si tude 
si mil i tude 
le git i mate 
di ver si ty . 
ne ces si ty 
te mer i ty 
e ter ni ty 
se ren i ty • 
se ver i ty 
e pit o me 



AMEBICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. I. 141 



ge om' e try 
mi nor i ty ^ 
pre^dom i nate 
e ipad i cate 
e man ci pate 
hy poc ri sy 
fie bauch e ry 
de form i ty 
e nor mi ty 
de pop u late 
i den ti fy* 
fi del i ty 
hy per bo le 
no^bil i ty 
mo ral i U 
SO lem ni ty . 
CO ag u late 
pro mn di ty 
pio nop o ly 
zo ol o gy 
chro nol o gy t 
pri or i ty . 
philology II 
hy pot e nuse 
hu man i ty 
fru gal i ty 
hu mil i ty 
u til i ty 
u bi qui ty 



activity 

af fin i ty > 
a vid i ty 

captiviV 
na tiv 1 ty 

fra gil i ty 

va ud i ty 

ra pid i ty 

ca pit u late 

ma lig ni ty 

tran quil li ty 

a lac ri ty 

ca lam i ty 

fa tal i ty 

barbarity^ . 

ca lum ni ate 

absurdity 

ar tic u late 

fa cili tate 

ad ver si ty 

ca tas tro phe|| 

a nat o my 

analojgy 

accommodate 

a pos tro phe 

as tron o my 

as trol o gy 

con sol i date 

com mod i ty 



ap prbx i mate 
a pol o gy 
jtau tol o gy 
for mal i ty 
cor rob ora^e 
pros per i ty 
Ion gev i ty 
hos til i ty 
antipodes 
con tam i nate 
commemorate 
con grat u late 
con form i ty 
a bom i nate 
ma jor i ty 
pos ter i ty 
com pul^o ry' 
of fi ci a^ 
in cor po rate 
cer tif i cnie. 
fer til i ty 
in i qui ty 
sin cer i ty 
in teg ri ty 
im men si ty- 
per plex? i' ty 
ex ter minati^ 
in fat u ate 
in ad e quate 



jM^iapiat^ 



t«bMk. 



|t,llfLin«i. 



UjAuV 



142 



jvnaimx sPELXiira-Boc^ 



in val i date 
insanity 
in atii ty 
difl semi nate 
^f fern i nate 
ex ten u ate 
In Bin u ate 
in ves ti gate 
as Sim i Tate 
▼er bos i ty 
ex <m er ate 
disconsolate 
aub or di nate 
ur ban i ty 
•ciirrility 
sim pliei ty 
a^ticP^ate 
an mm ci o^te 
pbilanthropy* 
ex as per ate 



as sas sin ate 
con fed er ate 
a pes ta cy 
a nom a ly 



va cu i ty . 
im pu ni ty 
com mu ni ty 
com mu ni cate 
ac ca mn late 



con spir a cy 

com mis er atdob scu ri ty 

a^ eel er ate e Kjuiv d cal 



ac ces to ry 
a dul ter ate 
ac com pa ny 
dis cov e ry 
dis til le ry 



em broi de ry |e phiem e ris* 
ap pre ci ate e lee tri cal • 



an ni hi late 
va ri e ty 



ex eg ge rate t dis so ci ate 
dissatisfy -i • i- 

capacity 

eo8mography«|api,n, pri ate 
orthography* 
an da ei> ty 
aux il ia ry 



re cip ro cietl 
^ \ys i an. 
di min u tive 
pre cip i tant 
e vent u al 



ab bre vi ate 
al le vi ate 
im nxe di ate 
ex pa ti ate 
in sa ti ate 
in gcB. ti ate 
sa ti e ty 



^as so ci ate 
an nu i ty 
gra tu i ty 



compassionate^a tu ri ty 



me trop o lijs 
re cog ni ^ance 
e :van ge list 
me qhaii i cai^ 
re spon si ble 
methodical 
pbenomienon* 
e mol u ment 
pre dom i nant 
pneu mat i asJ 
re pub li can 
po lit i cal 
ty ran ni cal || 
pi rat i cal 
i ron i cal 



•|bwC 



f <fi •4g» • Mfc 



^«kMk. 



»7< 



v 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLAS&BOOg;^ NO. I. 143 * 

Twd^ parrots were confined together in a lar^c cage. 
The cup which held their food was put at .the bottom ot 
the cage. Thej commonly sat on the same perch, and 
close beside each other. 

Whenever one oi them went down for food, the other 
always followed; and when they had eaten enough, they 
hastened together to^the highest perx^h of the cage. 

They lived four years in this state of confinement ;«and 
always showed a strong affection for each other. At the 
end of this time, the female grew very weak, and had all 
the marks of old age. 

Her legs swelled, and she was no longer able to go to 
the bottom of the cage to take Ker food : but her companion 
vrent and brought it to* her. He carried it in his bill, and 
emptied it into hers. 

This affectionate bird continued to feed his mate, in 
this manner, for four months. Biit her weakness increased 
every day. At last she was unable to sit on the perch ; 
and remained crouched at the bottom of the cage. Some- 
times she tried to get up to the lower perch, but was not 
able. . ' 

Her companion did all he could to assist her^ He 
often took hold of the upper part of her wing with hit 
bill, and tried to draw her up to him. His looks and hit 
motions showed a great desire to help her, and to make 
her sufferings less , 

But the sight was still more aflfecting, when thc^female ' 

was dying* Her distressed companion went rouiid and 

rouncTher a long time,, without stopping. He tried atlMt 

td open her bill* that he might give her t m^t fuf>d« Hi* 

N ft 



144 .jfUVENILE flSELLING-BQOK. 

trquUe iner«ased ererjr .mqmeiit He went ta and from 
her) wi& the utaiest appearance of digtresii* Sometiniet 
he made the moai mouriifttl cries ; ^t other times, he ixed 
his ejes on his mate, and^ was silent ;bu|t his loo sshowed 
tiie deepest sorrow. 

His <Sompanion at length died : and this affectimiate 9jMid 
interesting bird grew weak^ and weaker from that tfanei 
and lived oalj a. few inontlis. « 

This is ah 4(0ecting lesson, to teach us to be kind and 

loriiig, and rery helpful to one another ; and to thoseiper- 

' ions: in ^rticiitar» who are nearly connected iyith us^and 

who stand in need oi our assistance. 

' < . ■ ■ • t * 

.» 
We must accustom ourselves early not only to feel for 
iSkB misfortunes of others, but to do every thing that ties in 
imr power to assist them. 

Wluitever may he our oondition in lifii^ at present, and 

however improbable it may be that we may ever want, yet 

there are strange vicissitudes in this world, in which 

' Qothing can be said to be really certain and pemujAenl^ 

ijLt our first setting out in life, when yet unacquainted 
^th the world and its snares, When every pleasure en* 
jChants with its smile, and every olyect shines with th^ 
l^oss of novelty ; let us beware of the seducing appeal- 
slices which surround us. 

'' ll* we allow any passion, even though it be esteemed 

)i]ioQlnt,'to aieqiiire a]i absolute ascendant, our inward 

ftace will b^ impaired,' ' But if any, which has tiie taint 

; it gitilt, take early possession of our mind, we may date 

sftt that msMit^ jn^ ^f^w toanq 



» i 

, ^ i 

/ 



AHERtCAN ^HOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. L 145 

«> : ': The ^^ecjeoit (m the second syllable 



Hy drom' e ter 
di am e ter 
i ras ci ble 
hyperbola 
pro ver hi al 
pro gen i tor 
. o bliy i on 
coin ei'deni 
pro mis ca 0118 
yo lup tu ous 
juridical 
tiu meir i cal 
munifi eence 
6tt p^ flu ous 
tu mult u Olid 



u nan i mous 
al ter na tive 
af fir ma tive 
as par a gus 
col lat er al 
dog mat i cal 
au torn a ton 
a ban don ment 
adminis^ter 
ex tin guish ing 
ex ten sive ness 
di^ in ter est 
in dif fer ence 
em bez zle mevi 
am bas sa dor^ 



The accent on the third syllable. 



Ac ci dentf al 
pan e gyr ic - 
ap plec tic 
ftp pre hen sivo 
detrimental 
ep i d^m ic 
in de pend eijt 
in ci dent al 
hem is pher ic 
ineiffective 
coales.^pnce 
eacerdotai 
Jkg n cult are 



I « i 



in of fen sive^ 
dis affected 
in ad yer tence 
fun da ment al 
dis con tent ed 
or na ment al 
al to geth er 
in stru ment al 
dis in her it 
in tel lect ive 
ad o les cence 
pre disposal 
re im borse mettt 



146 JUVENILE 

ad a man tine 
am a ran thine 
math e mat ics 
alabaster 
ma} e fac tor 
man li fac ture 
mem o ran dum 
ben e fac tor 
3y8 tern at ic 
ev er last ing 
dis ad ran tage 
calamanco 
Bu per car go 
an 1 mcd cule 
Q ni ver sal 
o ri en tal 
al li ga tor 
bas ti na do 
me di a tor 
]g no ra mus 
cir ciim ja cent 
nav i ga tor , 
al ge bra ic 
reg u la tor 
un ac quaint ed 
mod er a tor 
com ment a tor 
le gis la tor^ 
en ter tain ment 
dis en tan gle 



SPBLLING^OOK. 

sem i CO loo 
in CO he rent 
an te ce dent 
dis a gree ment 
mis de mean or 
in ter fe rence 
advantageous 
dis com DO ^iire 
dis con tm ue 
in con sis tent 
in con sis tence 
.ortho drom i<^ 
hor i zon tal 
a pos tbl ic 
dis ap point ed 
in ter mix tnte 
in^ter mit ting 
un resist ed 
un re mit ting 
par a lyt ic 
met a php ics 
e CO nom ic 
su per struct ure 
o v^T bur den 
niiau so le urn 
mez zo'tin to 
sper ma ce ti 
ver mi eel li 
com pre hen sive 
renegade 



«i 



'•t'-^.h-.V* 



AJ^IeRICA^ SCIIOCh^NCLA^S-BOOK, NO. % 14T 



An i^pad vert' 
mul ti pli cand 
nev er the less 
mis rep re ^ent 
le ger de main 
re ci ta tive 
an te pe nult 



on the l^it syllable. 

su per a bound 
ay bir du poi^ 
mis un der stand 
mis rep re hend 
mis ap pre hend 
su per in tend 
flowerdeluc^ 



The toovH dn the thikd syllable. 



Cap ti vdL tion 
hao i ta tiod 
jnav* 1 ga tion 
gray i ta tion 
pal pi ta tion 
ad mi ra tion 
sal i ya tion^ 
cal cu |a' tion 
^rat u la tion 
grad u a tion 
ab ju ra ti(m 
Tal u a tion 
ad o ra tion 
ay o ca tion 
traAs por ta tion ^ 
ap pro ba tioQ 
ag gre ga tion 
afle ga tion 
con gre ga tion 
nom i fi^ tion 
des pe ra tion 



con sti tu tion 
con tri bu tion 
com pi la tion 
com pli ca tion 
*proy o ca tion 
con vo ca tion 
con so la tion 
cor o na tion 
pop u la tion ' 
con tu ma cious 
in no ya tion 
in vo ca tion 
ded i ca tion 
der i va tion 
per spi ra tion 
ex tn ca tion 
med i ta tion 
ex ci fa tion 
ef fi ca cious 
ex pi a tion 
tribu la tion 



148 



JUVENILE SPELLIKG-BOOK. 



rec re a tion 
es ti ma tion 
per pe tra tion 
el e va tion 
penetration 
rev e la tion 
res ti tu tion 
per se cu tion 
re^ o lu tion 
in eti tu tion 
dim i nu tion 
dis tri bu tion 
in cli na tion 
crim i na tior 
dis si pa tion 
in vi ta tion 
lim i ta tion ^ 
stim u la tion 
men du ra tion 
reg u la tion 
spec u la tion • 
rep u ta tion 
em u la tion 
ex cu ba tion 
ed u ca tion 
pec u la tioi 
sit u a tion 
des o la tion 
rep ro ba tion 
pev o lu tion 



el o cu tion 
ev o lu tion 
in vo la tion 
dis so lu tion . 
revocation 
ac cu ^a tion 
pub li ca tion 
suf fb ca tion 
cul ti va tion 
sup pli ca tion ^ 
am mu ni tion 
mal e die tion 
val e die tion 
ac qui ^i tion 
ad sci ti tious 
artificial 
ad mo ni tion 
ab o li tion 
man u mis sion 
trans po ^i tion 
def i ni tion 
ex hi bi tion 
in qui ^i tion* 
ben e fi cial 
prej u di cial 
ven e fi ciial 
rep e ti tion 
ex pe di tion 
ex po si tion 
prep o Si tion 



AMERICAN 

dep o si tion 
dem li tion , 
sac ri le gious 
er u di tion 
deg lu ti tion 
r^t o ri cian 
in ju di cious 
m tu i tion 
im po ^i tion 
trib u ni tial 
dis po si tion 
ir re li gion 
op po 81 tiun 
prop o si tion 
com po ^i tion 
cpm pe ti tion 
pol i ti cian 
sup po ^i tion 
eb ul li tion 
sur rep ti tious 
ad ven ti tious 
col lee li tious 
pro hi bi tion 
su per sti tion 
su per fi cial 
ju^ris die tion 
vi'o la tion 
e qui noc tial 
CO al i tion 
information 



BCHOOl. CLABS-BOOKi NO. I. 119 

ref or ma tion 
sep a ra tion 
dec la ra tion 
ex ult a tiou 
ex tir pa tion 
in uii da tion 
per tur ba tion 
pre^ er ra tion 
em en da tion 
ex pect a tion 
dis ser ta tion 
vi^ i ta tion 
ag gra va tion 
attestation 
ac cept a tion 
af feet a tion 
ap pel la tion 
con fis ca tion 
con suit a tion 
con stel la tion 
. OS ten ta tion 
OS ten ta tious 
com mend a tion 
con tern pla tion 
con dem na tion 
ob ser va tion 
molestation 
al ter a tion 
aug ment a tion 
'moderation 



I 



IfiO 

pro6 la xna tion ^ 
ap prehension 
con d0 seen sion 
con sti en tious 
con se quen tial 
prov i den tial 
con ii den tial . 
pen i ten tial 
pes ti leh tial 
rev er eh tial 
in au spi ciouft 
av a ri cious 
ap pa ri tion 



ij^VJ2m£ Sf ELUNG^BOOK. 



ad ven ti tious 
sat is fac tion 
cir cjum stan tial 
re^ ur rec tion 
in ter di<y^ion 
in ter jfec tion 
in ter ven tion 
im per fee tion 
in dis tine tion 
in ter mis sion 
in suf fi cient 
in ter rup tion. 
con tra die tioi 



Words of five iyUableF^ with the accent on the first. 



Ar bi tra ri ly. 
d^d i ca to ry 
ex pi a to ry 
ne ces sa ri ly 
sec on da ri ly 
dil a to ri ness 
cas ti ga to ry 
dep re da to ry 
lab o ra to ry 



fig u ra tive IV 
cus torn a rily 
sup pli ca to rj 
cir cu la to ry 
<k di na ri ly 
vol un ta ri ly 
ad u la to ry 
im pre ca to ry 
grat u la to ry 



The aecent on the seoondiiyUable. 



Co tem' po ra ry 
vo lup tu a ry 
vo lup tu ous ly 
vocab ulary 
prohibitqiry » 
el^c to ^ry. 



de gen er a cy 
hereditary 

5 re lim i na rr 
e clam a to 17 
de fam a to ry 
pre 1^ a to r j 



"T-^ 



^^m 



m*i 



AMSRICAX SCHOOL CLASS-BOOI^ Nq. L 151 



de rog a to rj • 
de po^ i to ry 
re po5 i to ry 
e pis to la ry 
e pis CO p'a cy 
re «d u a ry 
tu mult u a ry 
de lib er active . 
re cov er a ble 
fio to ri ous ly 

^ilis pen sa to ry 
inveteracy 
in tern per ate ly 
ira die ai ate ly 
vie to ri ous ly 
ef leiu i na cy 
in trin si cal ly 
in vol un ta ry 
ex tern po j-a ry 
in cen (\i a ry 
Jr reg u lar ly 
im a gin a ry 
ex cldm a to ry 
explanatory 
in flam ma to ry ' 
ob setv atory 

> con fed er a cy 
con sol a to ry 
intolerable 
in suf fer a ble ^ 



j{ 



a poth e ca ry 
con tin u al ly 
im a gin a ble 

' in yul ner a bte 
in suf fer a ble 
in Sep ar a ble 
un suf fer able 
un utier a ble 

' un gov erii a ble 
un com fort a ble 
un par don a ble 
in dissO luble 
im pen e4ra ble^ 
in es ti ma ble 
unreason able 
un S€^a ^oh a ble 
un char i ta ble r 
iiQ prac ti ca ble 
in VI o la ble 
a bom i na ble 
in cor ri gi ble . 
di^ hon our a ble 
in com parable / 
dis cov era Die 
in tol er a ble , 
con sid' er a ble 
com mu ni ca tive 
com mu lii ca ble 
in efficacy 
fas tid i OQd ne£^ 



o 



162 



JUVENILE SPEIXING.BOOK. 

t 

The accent on the third syllable. 



Ac a dem' i cal 
al pha bet i cal , 
iui ifer cep ti ble 
ep f dem i cal 
in de fen bi ble 
in tel iect u al 
rep re hen si ble 
rep re ^ent a tive 
tes ta ment a ry 
el e mcnt a ry 
com pi e hen si ble 
ar gu ment a tive 
met a phor i cal 
un con tarn i nate 
an ni ver sa ry 
di a fliet ri cal 
pri mo ge ni al 
u ni ver si ty . 
ge o, met ri cal 
e ran ,gel i cal 
e qui pbn der ate 
di a bol i cal 
deu ter oh o my 
u ni for mi ty 
phil o lo gi ca^ 
pe n od i cal 
cu ri OS i ty 
sym pa thet i cal 
e^ qui lib eit ate 



/c CO nom i cal 
me di be ri ty 
ge ne al 6 gy 
cy clo pe di a 
mu ta bil i ty 
hy dro pho bi a 
e qui lat er aji 
11 na nim i ty 
pu sil Ian i moua 
^e o graph i cal 
no to ri e ty 
e lee tri ci ty 
8U per cil ious iiess 
ho mo ge ne pus 

1>hra ^e ol o gy 
ios pi tal i ty 
sat is fac to ry 
math e mat i cal 
man u fac to ry 
em ble mat i cal . 
gen er al i ty 
reg u lar i ty 
sin gu lar i ty 
sim 1 lar i ty 
eir cum am bi ent 
im mor tal i ty 
lib er al i ty ' 
in ere du li tj 
in hu mil i ty 



AMERICAir SCHOdfL CLASS^OOK, NO. V 153 



chris ti an i ty 
prin ci p^l i ij 
prod i gal i ij 
pop u lar i ty 
€u>r di al i ty 
punc tu al i ty 
an i mos i ty 
ar is toe ra cy 
an a torn ic aJ 
cat c gor ic al 
as tro lo gi cal 
as trQ nom ic al 
a pos tol ic al 
et y mol o gy 
gen er OS i ty 
lex i cog ra j^lier 
in ter rog a tive 
fhys i og no my 
trig nom e try 
phy^ i ol o gy 
a er ol o gy 
in tro due to ry 
affability 
fallibility 
mag na nim i ty 
e qiia nim i ty 
met a phys i cal 
cred i bil i ty ^ 
iy po graph i cal 
in bar mo ni ous 



sen si bil i ty 
per pen die u lar 
ille git i mate 
dis abil i ty 
in tre pid i ty 
im be cil i ty 
in sig nif i cant 
ir re si&t i ble 
ig no min i ous 
con sail ^uin i ty 
con tra die to ry 
an a lyt i cal 
mon o syl la ble 
pol y syl la ble 
prob a bil i ty 
plau ^i bil i ty 
in stan ta ne oos 
mis eel la ne ous 
con tra ri e ty 
jus ti fi a ble 
im pro pri e ty 
du o de ci mo 
mat' ri mo ni al 
sen a to ri al 
ab o ri gi ne^ 
'dis o be di en| 
dis ^ gree a ble 
im ma te ri al 
sane ti mo ni ous 
del e te ri ous 



1 



154 



JU\nSNa.I3 ^BEUiMG^BCML 



in can ye ni ent 
pre^ by te ri an 
am bi gu i ty 
as si du i ty 
val e die to ry 
in ge nu i ty 
per spicu i*ty 
per pe to i ty 
ep i cu re an 
im por tu ni ty ^ 
op por tu ni ty 
con ti gui ty 
in CQn gru i ty 
as a foet i da 



8U per &\x i ty 
un ac pount a ble 
ac ri mo ni ous 
bac cha na U an 
an a lo gic al 
ge o lo gic al 
p^d agogi cal 
tan to To gi cal 
the o lo gi ca) 
re Cipro ci ty 
par si mo ni ous 
tes ti mo ni al . 
cer e mo ni al 
cate chet i eal 



The accent on the fourth tyllable. 



Ad minis tra' tor 
char ac ter id tic 
ec cle ^i as tic 
ex per i men tal 
en thu si as tic 
aman u en sis 
id i o mat ic 

Al le vi a! tion 
ab bre*Ti a tion 
rat i ^ ca tion 
am pli fi ca tion 
sane ti fi ca tion 
ad min istra tloo 
a bom ilia tion 



inul ti pli ca tor 
«u per a bun danc^ 
CO op^er a tor 
de nom i na tor 
hi e ro glyph ic 
mis un der stand in|^ 
' e% per i men tal 



» N 



1 



as sev er a tion 
ar gu meot i tioa 
ca pit u la tioa 
a nth me ti tian 
an ti ci pa tion 
a cad e mi cian 
an ni hi la tion 



AMERICAN SCHOOIi 

math e nia \i clan 
an nun ci a tion 
as so ci a tion 
con sid er a tion 
qual i fi^ ca tion 
con cat.e na tion 
con &A) u la tion 
con grat u la tion , 
ac com mo da tion 
or gan i za tion 
con fed er a tion 
con tin u a tion 
con so ci a tion 
com mem o ra tion 
cor rob o ration 
ex p6st u la t?on 
sub or di na tion ' 
. for ti fi ca tion . 
mor ti fi ca tion 
mod i fi ca tion 
ed i fi ca tion 
tes ti fi ca tion 
jper am bu la tion 
ges tic u la tion 
ex ten u a tion 
yersi fica tion 
ex as per a tion « 
sig ni fi ca tion 
in ter po. la tion 
in oc u la tioii 



CLASS-BOOK, NO. 1. ' 155 

jus ti fi ca tion 
multiplication 
ex am i na tion 
in ter pre (a tion 
in ter ro ga tion 
die Simula tion , 
cir cum lo cu tion 
cir cum val la tion 
recommendation 
re tal i a tion 
ejaculation 
re gen er a tion 
re liun ciatioi^ 
de nun ci a tion 
de ter mi na tion 
de lin e a tion 
pre cip i ta tion 
predestination 
de lib er a tion 
de nom i na tion 
e quiv o ca tion 
pro nunci a tion 
glo rifi ca tion 
CO op er a tion 
pro pi ti a tion 
he go ti a tion 
pro eras ti na tion 

Eu ri fi ca tion 
U mil i a tion 
de lib er a tion 

2 



196 JUVENILE SPEfiLING-BOOIC; 

WordB of five, six, «ev^, and eig^t i^ljablefl, proplBjr tubccntod. 

90r The Uamer, in revinngf Ms exer^ises^ should be made so ia« 
miliar with the orthography of the words id the precedixi^ and Ibl- 
lowing; lessons, as to b^ able to pronounce them without callii;^ tha 
letters. 



In vor ari ta 17 
un rea ^on a ble ness 
ilis o be' di «nt ly 
cer e me ni ous ly 
^ in qon ve ni ent ly 
in ter rog a to ry 
mer i to ri ous ly 
em ble mat i cal 
6u perimnua ted 
en per nu me ra ry 
diametrically 
in con ve ni ent ly 
el i gi bil'i ty 
in Ti^-i bil itj 
in cre4 i bil 1 ty 
8u»cep ti bil i ty 
in flex i bil i ty 
di^ in ter est ed ly - 
dis s^t IS fac to ry 
etymological 
fa mil i ar i ty 
het e ro g6 ne ous 
immu ta bili tjr 
in &1 li bil i ty * 
in coo sid' er ate ly- 
ex tern BO ra' ne ous 



dis ci pli na ri an . 
re cep ti bir i ty 
de fitruc ti bil i ty 
de fee ti bil i ty 
de cepti bil i ty 
pe cu li scr i ty 
pre des ti na ri ah 
u ni ver sal i ty 
ge ne a lb gi caj . 
su per in ten den cj 
in cor rupt i bil i ty 
in com pat i bil i ty 
in com pres si bil i tj 
im pen e tra bil i ty 
in di vi^ i bil i ty 
in tel li gi bil i ty 
per pen die u lar i ty 
m di vid u al i ty 
im ma te ri al i ty 
val e tu di na ri an 
lat i tu di na ri an 
an ti mo nar' chi al 
sem } di am e tqr 
ar is to crat i cal 
an te di lu vi an 
com men su n^hjX i ij 



AjUf^ICAN' SCHOOL GLASS^BOOK,^ NO. I. 1ST 

^ Progr«8ive. 

To think too highlj of oarseiyes, is unbecommg ami 
ridiculous. . V 

.Charity, like die sun, brightens all the objects on which 
It shines. 

Idleness and ignorance are the parents of manj vices 
and miseries* ^ ^ 

Persevere in learning, and try to remember what you 
have learned. 

'Make use of no, indecent language; indecency shpM^ 
"^rant of sense. 

A spirit of benevolenceris considered a godlike virtue; 
thei^&fore cherish it. • 

It 19 not only the duty of young person's to be djligentr 
but it is their interest also. 

The gay and pleasing are sometimes the most insidious 
Und dangerous companions. / ' . 

T^ slow in forming intimate connexions^ they may 
bring ^you to dishono\ir und misery. % ' 

Humility and knowledge, with pom* ai^parel5 excel pride 
;^n<it ignorance in~ costly attire. ^ 

T^ine is not our own, but merely lent to usi ami a 
moment lost can never be riideemed.* * 

NotJiing i^ better^ordi the attention of young persons 
&an the acquisition of knowledge. 

To.take sincere pleasure in the prosperity and excel- 
lencies of others, is a mark of a good heart. 

Perseverance in laudable pursuits will reward our la- 
bour, ai|d produce effects beyond calculation. 
' . True cbeerfulness makes a man happy wi&io himselff 
and prontutes <ht happ^ie^s of all around. 



•> 



I 6b juvenile SPELLtNG-BOOK. 

THE DILIGENT SCHOLAIU 

Who id he that comes along so tjfiskly with a snuU 
basket on his arm ? His limbs are strong and active ; his 
cheeks are rudd j, and his countenance is cheerful and 
good humoured. 

It is the diligent Scholar : he is hastening to aeheol, 
that he may be there in time. It is very seldom indeeil, 
that he is a minute after the time fixed, either in the 
momiBg, or in the afternoon.' He never misses going to 
school when his parents teU him to go. He Is not afiraid 
of summer's heat, or winter's cold, or of a little snow or 
rain. His teacher tells him that he should be very regu- 
lar in attending' school, in order that he may learn well 
and quick $ and he always likes to please and oblige hi9 
teacher and to do as he desires. 

. He never goes to school witli dirty hands or face« pr 
long nails, or uncombed hair. Hi| clotlies are all whole, 
and he keeps them as neat and clean as he can : nor does 
he ever play truant, or keep company with bad children. 

During school time he ^always sits, or stands in his own 
place; and he never goes put of the school witl^out his 
teacher's leave. He reads no book at school but such as 
his teacher tells him to read. He is very careful not to 
spoil or hurt any thing, or put anjr thing out of its proper 
ji^ace. ; 

When strangers come into the school he does not stare 
rudely 'at them ; he minds his business, and if they speak 
to him he answers them very ^civilly. He never talks, or 
'whi^era to to school-mates a Uf tiMkt,<he knows, would 



AMERICAN SCHCKML CIMSS^BOOK, NO. I. 15S 
prevent both them and himself from doing the business 
ther have to do. . ' 

• • • 

When the scholarsln his ckss are spelling or readings 
or reciting their lessons, be is very attentive 5 and learns 
a great d^al by hearing them, and what ihey are .taught^ 
He is always ready to answer any Question that his teacher 
asks him ; and' when he reads, or speaks, pronounces hia 
wordt so distinctly, that he can leasily be heard, and un« 
derstood. ...^ ^ 

When he does not understand any thing that he has to 
iBaiv, or that is said to him, he asks his teacher in a very 
respectful manner to explain it to him^ but he newr in'* 
terrupts his teacher when he is speaking or is very busy. 

The diligent scholar is desirous to learn something 
useful every^day, and remember what he has learned f and 
he is scarcely satisfied mth himself if he does not find 
that he improves every day he lives. He honours and 
respects his teacher, and pays great^ attention to all ho 
says, not giving him ^e trouble to repeat the same thing 
over and over again. 

When he has any thing to learn or to do at school that 
is very diffieuit, he often thinks within Inmself ; ^ my pa- 
rents will be very glad when they hear that I have learned 
or ddhethis hard task; and my teacher too will be pleased 
witii me ; and I shiill feel very happy and eomlbrtabl^ 
ivhen it is over. The sooner I go about it, ^e sooner it 
will be done." 

Amongst his schoolmates he chooses none for his friends 
but the good and sensible ; and loves to be w|ththem and 
to keep them company.' But he is civil fo all, and does 
what ke can, that H proper and rig^t, to oblige and aswt 



160 \ • JUVENILE SFFXLING^BOOK. 
them when tliej are in trouble or difficultjc. Espeaa^lj, 
he is kind to the younger scholars, almost as if thej were 
his own little brothers- He tells them what to do, and 
how to beliave ', anil takes pains to teach tliem, and make 
tliem coinfortablc. 

When he sees any of his schoolmates steal or iight« or 
hed^i^ %\\mp, tell iies, and use bad words, he is very sorry 
for Ijiem, and often requests them Wt to do so wickedly. 
When school is ov6r, he go^s away without making any 
laoise or disturbance. He does not play pr loiter in the 
streets or on the road« He goes liome a$ quickly as he 
can. 

, <« My ^mrents," says he, " ^e v^ry gofid to let mego to 
«chool,that I may learn many usefcd things. They say they 
)iave not tiipe to teach li^e all they co)Ad wish me to leari^. 
Before I went to aschaol they tangh^me to spell and read, 
and almost every thing I <knci^ $ and now, whenevei; 1 am 
at home, they arc almost always teaching me something 
about my. duty $ and I think I ccnild not take so much 
pains.at school as I do, if it were not to please them* I 
am sure I, ought to do all I can to oblige, obey, and serve 
^lem* 

He does net envy ^ scholars who are richer, or wiser 
than Jhe is^ nor does he despise those who ar^ poor, or 
defonaed^ He knows that they w^e all made by the 
same great Being that ni^e him ; and that we ought to 
behave as kindly to all persons as we wish that they.should 
behave to us. 

' He is very kind and good to his brothers and aisters. 
He likes to teach them all hecati, and to set th^m all a 
good eaMimpl^ev |iis parents, brothers, sisters, and til his 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO, i: l6l 

friends, love him. His teacher, too loves him, and com- 
mends bim very vcSi^ to all who make iuquirtes about 
him, and often speaks of him, and his good conduct, to 
the other scholars, and wishes them to take pattern bj 
him, and to behave as he does. , ' . 

Whefe'he leaves school, he >vill often, I dare saj, think 
of what he learned ther^, and try to remembier it, and to 
improv,e himself in it. 'He will be thankful to his pare^its 
and to hts teacher Who were so good to him,' and took so 
much jiains to teach him ; and especially he will be thank- 
ful to God who gave him so good parents, and so good 
teacherff* 

THE CHRISTIAN NEIGHBOUR. 

. f 

Tlie christian neighbour earnestlyeBdeavours to do to 
others whatever lie would wrish they should da to him* 
He renders to a:ll iheir dues ; tribute, to whom tribute; 
customt to whoni custom^ honour, to whom honmir. He 
deals not fitlBely, nor c^efraiids his neighbour in any thing. 
He would rather suffer himself to be defrauded tlian to 
defraud others* 

He restore that which was delivered him to keep, or 
tite Ipst which de found. If he.sees his neighbour's cat- 
tle or his sheep go astray, he brings them again to his 
Aeighb0uri in like mn^nner he does with all lost thinp 
which he has found* 

He is kind and aflTectionate.. He loves all about him* 
He always keeps and fulfUs his engagements, and speaks 
the truth. He is pitifVil and tender-hearted ; courteous, 
gentle, and easy to be entreated $ full of mercy, without 
pil^Utyi and without hypo^risjf He suffers Img^ «nd 



162 HTVENILE SP£LLiNe-BO0K. 

ts kind. He envies not ; he b^^ not of himself; he is 
not puffed up ; does not behave hknselC unseemly ; seeks 
i»nl J his own; is not easily provoked ; thinks no evil; 
rejoices not in iniquity, but rejoices in truthaad in doing 
justice to every one. . 

He ^omforte the afflicted; sopporte the weak| and is 
patient towards all .men. He visits the fatherless and 
widows in tlieir afflictions. << He is eyes to the blind, and 
feetto the lame.'' He rejoices ^with them tliat do^ rejmce, 
and weeps* with them that weep; He is not wear j^n veil 
dqing. 

He never judges hastily, nor rejoices when hw enemy 
is in adversity. If his ^nemy is hungry, he feeds him ; 
if he thirsts, he gives him drink. He dbes good to them 
that hate him ; he blesses them that curse him ; and prays 
for them that despitefuTIy use and persecute hiio. 
' Re neitlier slanders nor backbites his neighbour, nor 
imagines evil ^ag-^lnst liis brother in his hear<u He raises 
not a false report, cior gdes up and down as a tale bem^er. 
fle bears not false witness aigainst him. He deceives not^ 
but speaks the truth* No corrupt communieation pro- 
ceeds from his mouth. He walks circumspectly and 
honestly ; he is not slothful in business. - file does aH 
things properly and in order. ; 

He ^stains from every appearance of evil. His shk 
deration IS known to all men. He foHowi^not the mA 
tkude to do evil. He withdraws himself fi\>nk eveij 
one that vrhlks diiorderly. .H(s is a companion c^thea 
that fear the Lord, and of them that keep his precepts. 
His light ;so shines before then, that they see his <^riod 
tirorks/and thereby i^orilOf &^ fiilher whok in Utavmu- 



: AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BODE, KO. L 163 



. . Tlic DaitgcT pfPUasure. _ ■ 

BEHOLD th« boy, Ibflndden sweefa to prove. 
With luckless hand the hoa$}r<[| hives remove : 
Etr^lit, with an augry humthAtsouiidsto^arm*, ■ 
Forth rush the winged li'ibe in all their swarms : 
Too late, alas! they make th'offcnJe^imd, 
Thatfleasure's hotiey loaves astii^;behiail. ~ ^ 

Learn hence, ye heedless train, who gayly glide. 
In youth's trim t>ark, ilawn life's uncertain tide. 
That death oft larits beneath «nme glldea toy. 
And poison mingles in the cap or joy. 

The thaughtleps child overtiirns the hive, in order ta 
get tt tlie honey ; he knows the bees have sweets, but 
he forgets that they also have stings. Whea he liaa 
done the mischief, he perceives it too late ; forthe iQ(lu»- 
trioUB people sh&vr, hun that they will not he disturbed 
wUh impunity f and he £nda it impussible .to get tha 
P 



1 64 JU VE&ILE SFH^LIl^O-BOOK. 

honejy.unlesd he were able to destroy those who guard 
it. Amazed at the conseciuence of h& action, he flies with 
precipitation, but is overtaken bj the insects, who, set- 
tling upon him, leave behind them their stings ; the anguish 
of which may serve as a perpetual memorial of his rash* 
ness, and warn him how he attempts stolea sweets for the 
future. 

That which we obtain bj im{M'oper means seldom con- 
tributes to our happiness $ Imt often renders us miserable. 

In many people of a more mature age^ we see flie em- 
blem verified; and, though coi^mon experience m^t 
prevent thc^' evil, yet so c'areless are some, that they will 
make use of jio experience but their own, which is always 
dearly bought, and often comes too late to have the effect 
desired by every rational and thinking person. 

The wild and unthinking always imagine forbidden 
pleasiires t6 be sweet $ and, proceeding on Uiis maxim, 
often plunge themselves into tlie most ruinous circum- 
stances, and become sensible of their errours only when 
it is too late to amend them. ^ ^ 

But they will overturn the hivcf they must have As 

honey, while they little expect the sting : when they feel 

it (like the boy in tlie emblem] surprise is added to their 

affliction, and their distress is doubled by their being no 

> vays provided to sustain the accident. 

If you would be wise, take not tlie honey while die 
hive is swarnung ^ let not your pleasures be mixed witk 
guilt; and then you may rest secure that the j wilUeats 
no sting beliind them. 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO* l/ 161> 

» 

THE IDLE BOYi 

William was an idle^ad,' 

And loungM about all day ; 
And though he many a lesson had, 
' He ihinded nought but play. 

He only ca^p'd for top orballf 

Or niaH)les, hoop and kite $ ^ 
But as for learning, that was all 

Neglected by him quite. 

in vain his parents' kind advice. 

In vain his meter's care ; 
He fbUow'd ev'ry idle vice. 

And learnt to curse and swear. 

And think you, when he grew a man. 

He prosperM in his ways ? 
No— wicked courses never can 
^ Bring gqod and happy days. 

Without a shilling in his pvirse. 

Or cot to call his own, 
Poor William grew from bad to worse^ 

And hardened as a stone. 

And, oh ! it grieves me much to write 

His melanchely'end ; 
T%en let us leave the dreadful sight^ 

And thoughts of pity send. 

But may we this important truth 

Observe and ever hold ; 
^ All who are idle in their youth, 

Will saGTer when they Ve old.*' 



166 JUVk^MLE SPE];.UNQ-BOOK. 



Children^should listen with attention to the admonitioiid 
and counsels of their parents. 

T6 relieve the indigent^ to comfort the affiicted, to pro- 
tect the innocent, to instruct the ignoitmt, to reward the 
deserving, and to forgive injui'ie|, is.a^reatandGkidlike 
employment. 

If we ought to be thankful for services received from 
our friends, how ought our hearts to glow with 'gratitude 
to him whd has given us being, and bestowed on us all the 
blessings we enjoy. 

Let us not expect too much' pleasure in this Kfe; no. 
situation is exempt from trouble : the best persons, no 
doubt^ are the iiappiest $ but they too have their trials and 
afflictions. -^ 

How rich and beautiful are the works of nature I What 
a bountiful provision is made for our wan^i and pleasures ! 
Surely the author of so many bleasing^'js worthy of our 
love and gratitude. • 

' How pleasant it is, when we lie down ait night, tp reflect 
that we are at peace with alf persons ; that we have care-^ 
fully peribrmed the duties of the day, and that the Al- 
mighty beholds and loves us ! j 

The days that are past ure g(>ne for ever/ those that arc 
to come may not ceme to us; tli^ present time only is 
ours $ let us therefoi:e improve it as much a% p^sible. 

CarefuUy avoid the fcdlies of others, and ie^ not vice 
rule over thy heart : so shall virtue establish itf empire in 
tliy breast, and her Nonunion jshall be fixed fo) evdr* 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOCXK, NO. I. l&t 
Eiihi^r idleness or extravagance will bring a man te 
poverty and misery. 

ViFtue strengthens in adversity, moderates in pros* 
perity^gaides in society, entertains- in solitude, ;id vises 
in doubte, supports in sicluiesSf and comforts in the hour 
rf death. , ' • , '. 

If young persons were determined to conduct them* 
selves by the rules of virtue, they would not only escape 
many dangers, but would command respect from tlieJicen- 
tious themselves. 

It ^ may be laid down as confirmed by reason and ex« 
pefience, that nothing requires greater caution in our 
conduct, than our behaviour to those with whom we are 

most intimate. 

• • • \ 

Yming persons cjinnot be too much on their guard, 
against falling into too great a familiarity with their com- 
panions ; for 'w<e often lose the good opinion of those with 
whom we are most familiar. "^ ' 

In judging of others, let us always think the most fa- 
vouraUy, ind employ the spirit of charity and candour: 
but in judging of ourselves^ we should be exact and 
oevere. 

If. we considered how nmch the comfort or uneasiness of 
all around us depends on the state of our own temper^ 
we should' surely endeavour to render it sweet and ac- 
commodating. 

Be cautious of beUeving ill reports of others, and far 
moine cautious of reporting fhem, lest they should prove 
iUse $ and then shame will attend thee for &j foUy^ and 
Qomcience acc^ thee of injustice* 

P2 



JUYEKILE SPELUHG-BOOa. 



' - ' WITH phintive cooin;:, lo I Uw tarU«don 

Lunents tha fate of his departed lore i ' ' < 

Hii mate once lost, iu> comioK Don he knoin ; 
Hii litUe breast with inward ati°;ui5hg;lowi; 
Sor lawm, ■uo' graves, his (hrobbing beartCEin diun; 
~ Tf or other love his languid boaom warm ; 

Oppresi'd witb grie^ he ficldi bis laUit breUl^ 
Andproru, at last, hia cwutanCf in dMtll. 

A proper leuen to the fickle miiidt 

An emblem apt of tendernen refia'd; ^ 

Aflectioo pare, awl undUseinbled lov*,-- 

Which abjen^e, lime, nor death, caiQ lu'er reuMHs 

Hie dov^ 19 the moet gentl6 ind lonii^ of birdsi ibr , 
ivhich qualiti'es the Uicient Jieatheiu feigned tiati 4he 
chariot of Venus, the godflesB <gf iM^ wm dnTi* l|| 



# 



AxMKRICAN SCIlOCt CLASS-'BCKMC, NO. t. 1§^ 

turtledoves. The constancy of the dove is such that it 
becomes a. proverb; and .when one of a pair dies, the 
other generally pines itself to death ^: so true is ^icir love, 
and.so far are they from a desire of changing.. A very 
striking instance of the power of instinct, and an exam- 
ple worthy of imitation. - 

The dove and the lamb are so remarkable for. their gen- 
tleness, that they have beeh adopted as symbols of our 
most holy religion, and are always represented, in the 
sacred writin^s^ as the most perfect embleois of virtufe 
and innocence. ' 

* ■ ■" • • 

> ^jfpUcation. .. " . 

Constancy, whether in love 'or friendship, is certainly 
one of the most striking proofs of a great and noble mind ; 
as fickleness is of the contrary. Love is but a m^re rer 
fined, a more tender, friendship ; and when that love is 
strengthened by the more sacred ties of marriage, it ought 
to be equally lasting and inviolate. ' 

In such ^ state, the joy or grief of either party must be 
shared tijrthe other : they must be both as one, or happi^ 
iifiss can never li^ expected. 

In order to promote this agreeing will, constancy, ten- 
derness, and an allowance for the frailty of humanity, 
are indispensably necessary. ' When these are united, 
tliere may truly be said to be a unicfn of soUls ; which is 
the greatest felicity on earth. 

The emblem; of the dove is gne of those lessons drawn 
from nature,' whereby life best amorigst us may profit; 
URcc we may well be ashamed to be xHitdone) either in 
cowtancy or tend^rnes^y bf airjr o£ the teute Grei^tinn. 



170 , nrvEmLE sFfixiN0.6oc«. 

THE CUCKOO 

Hail, beauteous stranger of the woo^^ 
^ Attendant on tiie spring! 
Kow heaven repair^ thy vernal seatj 
And Woods thj welcome sing. 

Soon as the daisy decks the green, 
Thy certain voice we hear 5 

Ha3t thou a star to guide thy pajQi, 
Or mark the roUing year ? 

Deligbttul visitant ! with thee 
I hail the time of flowers. 

When heaven is fill'd with music sweet 
Of' birds among the bowerg. , 

The schoolboy wandering in the wpod. 
To pull the flowers so gay, 

Ofi starts, thy curious voice to hear, 
'And imitates thy lay. 

iBoon as the pea puts on the bloom, 
Thou ily'st the vocal vale $ 

An annuflj guest in other lands. 
Another spring to hail. 

8weet bird, thy bower is ever green^ 

Thy sky ia ever cle|ur ; 
Tbon hast no iioiTow in thy song, 

No #intet' in tiiy year. • 

! could i fly, Vd fly with toce 5 
We'd make^ with joyful wing> 

Oiir annual' visit'o'er the globe, 
Cmpanions of the' sj^iqg. 



* ^itr»- 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CL AS^<B0OK, NO. I. 171 

". » 

f . . / 

' THE DUTIES OF CHILDREN AND PARENTS. 

-' .% : ■ ■ ^ ■ " ^ . 

It maj be truly said, tha( if cliildi^en be undiitiful tu ! 
Iheir parents^" they seldom pro\^ good to any o^er rela- 
tions. ^ j 

The honour \Yhich children are required to give to j 
their father and mother includes in it, love, revei^ncc, ♦ | 
obedience, and reliefi. It is usual .witjj providence to re- 
turn, in kind, men's disobedience to their parents, , I 

Where shall we find a person who has received, from i 
any one, benefits so great, or so numerous, as children 
have received from th^ir parents ?* To them it is, that 
they owe their very existence ; and consequently, all the 
pleasures and enjoyments of life. No one will expect a 
return of, kindness, however inconsid«i^ble, froAi hint . 
who can show. himself unmindful of what he 0wes hit 
parents. 

To see a father treating a son like an elder brother 
and to see sons covet their father's qompanj[and conver*. 
sation, because they thii^k him. the wisest and most agree- 
able man/>f their acquaintance, is tfa^ most beautiful pic- 
ture which the ey^ .can behold. It is a transplanted self- 
attachment, as sacred, as friendship, .as pleas)i|rable as 
love, and as happy as religion can mi^^ it. 

If every father remembered his (iw,n thoughts and in- 
jclinations, when be was a son, and every son remember- 
ed what he expected from his fatlier, when he himself 
was in a state of dependency, this one reflection woulu 
keep fathers from being rigid| and sons from being d]9«> 
8olttte« . : *. . % 



r 
i 



172 JDVENIliE SPELUNG-BOOK. 

Vrt teen^ in twilights' pensive hour, 

The moss-clad dpme, the mould'ring tow^r^ 

In awful ruin stand ; • 
That dome where grateful voices sung, 

- ^ That tower whose chiming ibusic rang> 

> ^ Mi^esticallf grand ! 

IVe^een, mid sculptur'd pride, the ton4)» 
, Where heroes slept in silent gloom, 
Vneonscious of their fame ; 
Those who, wilii lau^el'd honours crown'df 
iljnong their foes spread terror round, 
And gaitt'd— 401 empty name. 

Fve seen, in Death's dark palace laid. 
The ruins oi a beauteous maid, 

Cadaverous and pde! 
That maiden who, while life remain'd. 
O'er rival charms in triumph reign'd, 
i The mistress of the vale. 

X*ve seen, where dungeon damps abid^ 
A youth, admir'd in manhood's pride, ^ 

In fancied greatness rave : 
Wlio, in Rbason's happier day, 
Was virtttoiia» witty, noUe, gay^ 

Learned, gen'rous, and bkiive. 

Kor dome, nor tow'r, in twilight shade, 
Kor hero fidl'n, nor beauteous inaid. 

To ruin all consign' j. 
Can with ^ucli pathos touch the breast, 
Ab (on the maniac's form impressM) ' 

TkS RVIVS of a noble MINn. OSBOAV. 



AHERtCAH SCHOOL CLA»^BO0V NO, L . V^H 



DtetU. 

WOULDST tbon, anlUnking, to Uw b«ut dnw MM 
Cu^t br his pIuQtire C17 and frsodfal lew .* 
Ah ! fly, in (mt, the di'eailAi) atroka of fitte, 
. Norstay ta&elil,aiid1>ewise teoluB. ' 

Dac^tf ul wen, and all Ihair mau* Amv 
Nor by dinemblcd aorrowi b« imdoiie : 
If BUKh thej Mwi tb«ir actiati to dehors, 
Forpve tbtir crinMi, but tnut tb^ wonk BO moiifc 

The crocodile is reported to weep<iTecita]VBj,aa4to 
bend forth a jiiteous aad diitreuflil cry, in order tv alliM! 
men pr bewta to its haonts, that it naj teixe and defMC 
tinm. 

Tfiit atorj is TBTtouslj told. Some oay it devoon irittk 
ercf it catches, all but the head, and then weeps becauft 
oyini^u left to satisfy its rapwiotUBi^iftt. Iti(>tfft 



174 JUVENILE SPELLING-BOOK. 

' likelj^ on coin[)aring tlie different accounts, that this Mi- 
mal makes a noise, which other creatures take for a com- 
plaint, though probably it 'i;s only a sound it cerarmonlj 

/ sends forth over its prey, as the growling of a cat over a 
mouse. ' However that be,* crocodile's tears have become 
a proverb ; ancl.a mgral of sound prudence may be drawn 
from the embleuk / ^ 

■ 

Application* ' ■ 

.^ it is man's greatest praise " to be wise as a serpent 

and as innoc'ent'as a dove," so, he who suffers himself io 

fall into the snares of designing naen, will quickly put it 

• out of his own power to be of service to the good and 

virtuous. 

* 

No principle is more noblie than tliat of forgtvii^ in- 
juries — nothing so wicked or unprofitable as a rancorous 
revenge. Heaven itself commands us to forgive our ene- 
mi^j but it is the height cf folly to tru^t those who have 
injured us. 

,There are some peopte who, like the crocodile in the 
emblem, will even seem to lament their foriuer injiiries,Tn 
order to have it in their power to do fresh ones. • Of guch 
persons beware ! do' them no hanp, but take care not to 
puiit into their power to do you any. 

. Jf you wQidd pass through life with any degree of satis- 
iactiim, it is necessary that you .be good andpirudeat. 

Wisdom is the sister of virtue $ jqiii'^them both in jour 
cmultt<it i and^ if it should haf^n that you do not ei^oy 
aU the.felicity you mi^t txpt/atf yoin^ill at least hatethe 
liiwfort to detorve it. 



\ 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. L 175 

Progpresaye, 

Feeding the hungry, clotiiing the, naked, and comforts 
ing the afflicted, yield more pleasure than we receWe frjom 
those actions which respect only ourselves-; beneyoleiie* 
may in this vkw be termed the most refined self-love. 

While bbssed with health and proiq^erity, cnltivate aii 
humble and compassionate disposition : think Of the ^Uft* 
tresses of human life; oC the solitary cottage, the dying' 
parent, and the weeping orphan. 

When the ground is covered with snow, and the rivers 
with ice ; when the cold north wind is heard to whistte) 
and the darkening clouds arise, let those who sit bj 
cheerful firesides, remember the poor, the tceeai)^ and 
the friendless. \ 

We should never be proud or vain of &e advantages 
we possess ; but humbly endeavour to use them for liie 
benefit of our fellow-creatures, and to iheglory of fhst 
Being from whom we have received them. 

He who pretends t(^ great sensibility towards mi^, md 
yet has no fedling for tlie hi^ object of rel^ion^ up 
heart to admire and adore the great Father of the unt- 
verse, has reason to &trust the truth and delicacy of hifl 
sensibility. > 

ToQfli is the season tut improvement la knowledge, fot 
fonnang the mind, for gaining such accomplishments as 
may make «s happy and nse&l. What a golden age m 
that which albrds ns audi lypoEtunities of laying up faap» 
piness fior iqicr years ! 



176: JUVENILE SPEIXING-BOOK. 

SIN MAKES GOD ilNGRT. 

How kind ih all his works and wwys 

Must our Creator bei 
I learn a lesson of his praise , 

From ever J thing I see. 

* Ten thousand creatures hj his hand 
' - Were brought to life at first : 
His skill their different natures plaBn'd^^ 
And made them from the dust. 

He condescends to do them good. 

And pities when they ^r J ; 
For all their wants a,re understood 

Bj his Attentive ?yc. ♦ 

And can so kind a Father frown ? 
' Will Ife, who stoops to care 
For fittle sparrows failing down, 
I^espise an infantas prayer ? 

No ; he regards the feeblest cry : 

lis only when we sin 
He puts the smile «f mercy by, 

And lets his pov^er begin. 

'Tis sin that grieves his holy min^ 
* And makes his anger rise ; 
And sinners old or young shall find 
./'Ho&v^urinhiseyes* ^ 

; fittt when the %rolKn sq^t bums, 

And wouSd from Mn departy 
^e^itod of merey nttftt' spuntt 
The fard(flii| humble heart 



AMEUCATf SCHOOL CLA33>BOOS, I 



" nt Dimget ^ Tmplalion. 

THE nil]' iuh, vhne planus in U|e bTDol^ 
Hath goi^d and swallowed th« deitnicUve hade; 
la vain ha flonnca on the qiiJv>riBg hair, 
' I)rk«minlitii^^lbrttit«breatbet}iau[^ieralr| 

CanehtbrUibUfiutiiei^tiringbatti ^ 

He tMBta his min) and labiniti to fikU. - •- 

Amid base bribn : Uw temptiDg: l^rc dUpia^'d, 
If oacB yon araze, you perish eelf-betraj'd. 
Ba alow to take irhen Btrangen haste to giTB, ■ 
Lcstof your n^ you the price receive. 

The simple GbIi sports on the surface of the cl«ar 
streams, while the wily angler pltes his rod and line ; the' 
timid animal often approadies the bait, and as often re- 
turns from it; till at last, just as the sun shrouds his 
radiance behind a cloud) he ventures to jump i* "■' 



178 ! JUVEinLi: S?EJXING^B0Q1C 

fictitious fl J, swaUows it at oiice, and with it swkllowa the 
baibed hook. Thttt moinetit seala bia ruiiii* Simuiiiig 
from fte wound, he stnigglesi i^d endeavoura to &ee 
hinwlfy but in vain* 

Ihe anglet* giving fkll play to tiie line, jtermits Kim to 
Vtth away with it ; Init his strng^e only tenda-fo make his 
ruin mere ^t^n: he is soon tired out^ and then, being 
lifted out of the wat<(r, proves an e^sy prey to his foe. He 
pants; he expires in agonies $ yet owes his destruction to 
a slender hair: so often do seeming trifles tend to ruin 
iad perdition. 

What a fit emUem is this^ of tho^e heedless persons 
whp suffer themselves to be deluded by glitterii^ tempta- 
tions, or drawn into siiittes by the artifices of the vicious 
and designing. 

If, for t^ while, like the fish, they play about the hook, 
yet, in aome unguarded moment, when ^e light of their 
reaadn is obscured^ they seize the specious bait, ^ey then 
find all tiieir struggles ineSectual. He who has had the 
art to catch, ^like the angler in the emblem) has general* 
ly. the judgment to secure his prey. 

Such a 9ne will but smile at their v^in attempts to re- 
cover their liberty, while he is sensible these c^y serve 
atill fiirther to enthnd them. The die is cast, and they 
become the victims of their own imprudencei 

llie* offers of 8om%^ men are dan^roils ; be not there- 
fere led away by specious appearances : think before you 
act|and let the character of the giver, and tiieoAiditiolM 



AMER!C/\N SCHOOL CLASS^OOK, NO. I. 179 
ne is likely to^xact, be well considered before jou re- 
ceive <lie gift* If it be the price of vice or follj, shun it, 
as JOU hope for peace and honest fame: each temptation 
you. have avoided, will strengthen you against the next { 
custom will make the most difiicult self-denials easy. 

, THE CHARACTER OF A GOOD SON. 



t. 



The good and dutiful son is one w]\o honours his pa 
rents, by paying th^m the utmost deference and respect 
by a becoming reverence for them, a filial affection for 
their persons, a tender regard for their safety and preser- 
vation, a constant and cheerful attention to their advice^ 
and a ready and implicit obedience to their commands. 

As he becomes every day more sensible of his obliga- 
tions, he grows every day more solicitous to repay them. 
He employs his youth to support their age, his abundance 
to relieve their wants, and his knowledge and slrengtli to . 
support their infirmities. He is lAore careful of his cha- 
ractjer and repntatiofi in the world, because their's depend 
upon it. ' 

Ever anxious for their welfare, and attentive tb tlieir 
happiness, he endeavours, by every method in his power, 
to prolong their days, thafhis own << may be long in the 
lat^t." He rests assured, tliat God will not only bless 
obedient children, but reward them with the possession ' 
of heaven, where it will be well with them for ever $ and 
where we shall all join, son and father, daughter and j 
mother, wife and hugband, servant aad master, to honoui , 
our great P^ent, the Pi-otector,the Lord, andtheMmitei 
ofttiaU. • , 



180 JUVininLE iSl^ELLING-BOCW. 

THE BIRi>'k NJSST* 

_ ' ' • . ■..'...'•, •» . 

Yes, little nest, ni hold you fast, 
And little birds, one, two, three, four; 

IVe wfttch'd jourlong^ you're mine atiast^ 
Poor little things/youHi Escape no mo^e. 

Chirp, cry^ and iatter, as youwiH, 
' Ah ! ^mple rebels, 'tis in vain, 
Ti^ur little wings are unfledg'd still J 
How can you freedom then obtain ? 

What note of sorrow strikes my ear ! 

b it their mother thas distrest I 
Ah yes, and see, t^eir father dear 

Flies round and rounds to seek their iiest. 

. And iir it I, who cause their moan? 
I, who so oft, in summer's heat, 
Beneath yon^oak have laid me down. 
To listen to their songs so sweet ? 

If fSroBi my textder motlier's' side, 
Some wicked Wretch shotild make me fly^ 

Full well Ibnow 'twould herbetide, . 
To far^ her heart, to sink, t6 die. 

And shall^I tiien db cniel prove, 
IToiir .little ones;.to force ^way,P 

No,no$ together, live! and loyej . 
See.hei:e ^ey are; take them I pniy> ' 

Go, gentle birds ; go fl^e as air ;' ' 
While oil again^in^ summer^s heat, 

To yonder oak I will r^iair. 
And listen 4a jwur aoxig so sweet 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK. NO. I. 181 



Self-DtnM. 

WETH hast; ateps, at the Gnt dawa of day, 
TbectlMilaltraTellerpanaGihisTay; ' - 
BattiT'dataora, he seeln adiadf grore: 
Of lofty trves, whose brandiei meet abort 
CsQceal'd beoesth the graa th*'<eT|>cdt lin : 
The Bvraia drawl near, and bj hi> rcmm diM. 



Tlius he, who, leanng virtnt'i sacred WAjt, . 
Secitratr (brongb the paths oT pleaauTS ib^yi : 
Womidedbf vice, Uspeaceand bouoBTlott, - 
Boyi bts a^)wieiice at too dear acost ! 
To him wtaO'P«nevara, Blots are giv'D — 
Fair &BW on earth, aiideadlesibUiS'iaheav'a. 

A HTpent concealed in the grass is an opt emblem ot 
fhuid mil tIcb, twoeaJed under specious appearances. 
The traveller goes on his rowl witit cheeriiilneu, during 



18^8, ' WVENILE 9PELLINCUB00K. 

the moniiDg hours; he dmibts not but he shall soon get 
to his journej^s end, and expects not to meet with the 
least obstiacle in his way. ' ' ^ \ . 

But when he feels the heat increasing^ his vigour begins 
to relax : when the hour of noon arrives, he is absolute!/ 
weak and faint. He beliolds a woed, spreading its in- 
viting shade; he considers not, that to enter, is to deviate 
from \\\^ road : he tliinks not what dangers he may encoun- 
ter there : all his attention is taken up in relievii^ him- 
self from a present inconvenience. 

He enters tlie gi'Ove, and loses himself among its cool 
and agreeable windings. When he would retut-n, he finds 
himself perplexed, as in a maze; and before he can re- 
gain the road, he is bitten by a venomous reptile, which 
was concealed from his. sight among the grass» 

He now wishes he had borne the heat of the day; his 
blood is consumed with fires more intolerable. He faul- 
ters, sinks under his pains, and falls a victim to his own 
iiDprudence. 

Applicalion, 

•« 

Virtue is never safe but when she is secured by the 
guard of prudence : disctetioii is her handmaid^i^^and wis- 
dom her counsellor and instructer. 

Caution is a necessary lesson to be learned by youth ; 
and perseverance, one of the best qualities tliey can be 
endowed with. 

Wlien fortune smiles upon us, it is not so difficiilt to 
go on in the practice of virtue ; a man may easily obtain the 



AMERICAI^ SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. L 183 

reputatioQ of being good, when he is ao circumstanced, 
that he must become a monster of vice to be wicked. 

But you who wottld^ attain to the end of jour labours, 
be virtuous ; and to your virtue join prudence ; and to 
your prudence add perseverance j so shall you not faU 
into the snares of pleasure, nojr feel tiie envenomed stings 
of guilt and remorse, whose &ngs are sharper than those 
ot the serpent, and whose poison is more deadly than that 
of the venomous adder. 



When the love of pleasures and vicious companions is 
allowed to amuse young persons, to engross their time, 
and to stir up their passions, let them take heed, and be- 
ware ! — ^the d^iy of ruin begins to draw nigh. Fortune is ' 
squandered; health is broken; fnends are offended, es- 
tranged ; aged parents, perhaps, sent afflicted and mourn** 
ing to the dust. 

You are the children of one fiither, provided for by his 
care ; and the breast of one mother nourished you. Let 
the bonds^of affection, therefore, unite thee with thy 
brothera and sisters, that peace and happiness may dwell 
in thy father's house. 

And when you are separ^ed in the world, remember 
the relation that iHnds you to love and unity ; and prefer 
not a stranger before thy own blood. If thy brother is in 
adversity, assi^i him ; if thy sister is in trouble, forsake 
her not. So shall the fortunes of thy father contribute to 
the support of his whole race ; and his care be continued 
to you all-in your love to each other. 



Ifti ' JUVENILE SPELLING-BOOK. 

THEJLAMB, 

A tear bedews %i J Delia's ^j% . 
To think yon playful lamb mitstdi^! 
From crystal sprii^ and flow'ry mead 
Must iu his priin£ of life recede f 
£rewhile, in sportive circle, round 
She saw him \ivbeel» aoid fris^k^ and bound | 
From rock to rock pursue Ws waj, 
And on the fearful margin plaj» 
She tell^ >vith what delight he stood 
To trace his features, in tlie flood ; 
Then skipped aloof with quaint amaze 5 
And ^en drew near, again to gaze* 
She tells me how with eager sipeed 
He flew to hear my vocal reed ; 
And how with critic face profound^ ^ . 

And steadfast*ear/ devoured the sound. 
His every frolic, light as air, 
Deserves tibe gentle Delia's care $ ^ 
■ And tears bedew niy Delia's eye^ 

To think yon playful laftibmiist die. *" 

THE GRASSHO?PER. 

Happy insect ! what can be 
In happiness compared to thee? 
Fed witli nourishment divine^ 
The dewy morning's gentle wine ! 
Thou dost drink^and dance, and sing, 
Happier than the happiest king ! 
All the fields which tliou dost see, 
All the plants belong to thee. 



• 



A^IERICAN SCHOOL CLASSfBOOK, NO. I. 185 

All that •ummer houx« |nt)dttce» 

Fertile made with early juice. 

Man for thee does sow and i^ough^ 

Farmer he, and landlord thou! . 

Tliou dost harmlessly enjoy, 

Nor does Ay luxury destroy ; 

To thee of all things upon ^arth, , . 

lafe is no longer than thy mirth. 

Happy insect, haj^y, thou 

Post neither age nor winter know. 

But when thou'st drunk and danc'd and sung 

Thy fill, the flow Vy leaves amoi^ 

Sated with a summei^s feast, 

Thou retir'st to endless rest. 

THE ROSE. 

How fair is the rose S what a beautiful flower ! 

The glory of April and May : 
But the leaves are beginning to fade in an hourt 

An(f they witiier and ^ in a day. 

Yet the rose lias one powerful beauty to boast 

Above all the flowers of the field : 
IVhen its leaves are all dead, and fine colours are Iqsty 

Still Jiow sweet the perfume it wiU yields 

So frail is the youtii, and the beauty of man^ 

Though they Uoom and look gay, like, the rose ^ 
Tet all our fend care to preserve them Is vain, 

as fast as he goes. 



186 JUVENII^E SPELLING-BO«. 

Then 1*11 not be proad of my yoath or my beauty^ 

Since both .of them wither and fade, 
But gain a good name by wall doing my dttty; 

That will scent like % rose, when I'm dead. 

THE TWENTY-THIRD PSALM. 

* The Lord my pasture shall prepare. 
And feed me with a shepherd's care : 
{ His presence shall my wants supply. 

And guard me with a watchful eye | 
My noon-day walks he shall attend, 
And all my midnight hours defend. 

When in the sultry gl^ I faint^ 
Or on the thirsty mountfun pant ; 
To fertile vales, and dewy meadsy 
My weary wand'ring steps be leadd ^ . 
Where peaceful rivers softand slow^ 
Amidst the verdant- landi>.cape flow. 

Though in the patlis of death Ltread^ 
With gloomy horrors overspread : 
My steadfast heart shaU fear no ill ; 
For thou, O Lord ! art with me still 
Thy friendly crook shall give vfie aid. 
And guide me throu^ the dreadful shade. 

Though in a bare and ragged way. 
Throng devious lonely wilds I stray, 
Thy bounty shall my pains beguile : , 
The barren wilderness shall smile. 
With sudden greens and herbage crewn'd, 
And streams shall murmttr all acpiutd. Aontsov 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. I. 18? 



Filial Dulg and A JMioiu 

1,0! the yonng ■lorfc hi! duteam wing prepatM 
Hu nged lire to feed wiCh constant carea ; 
O'er hill* iind d^es hit pr*ciaa> load coDtej^ 
And the gr-est Mbl of filial dutf pM* : 
Grateful ratnntl b; Natiirc>>MU(]iMifn'd, 
A fair example tet to human kind. 

MaraL 

Sbouldit thou refuje thj parenta neeilfut aid. 
The rerrBtorkmigntlbe foul crime npbniid: 
BamiDdfulhowthcyrear'dth; tender youfli; . 
Bmt with tbeir fniltiei, eerre them ifill with tnrtk; 
So majr'it thou with long lift and peace be Uot, 
Tin heav^D AaH caU thee to atenul rati 

This bird is generally esteemed an emblem tif flHal 
lore ; insoiNtich, thtt it has ever acquired th6 name of 
pious, from the Just regard it is ssid to paj to acts of filial 
iHetj and duty. - 

R 



188 JirV£NIL]B 8P&LUNG.B0OK. 

Storks live to a very advanced age; tbe consequeUct 
9f which 199 that their limbs grow, feobley l^eir feathers 
fall H/ff and tliey are no wajr capable of providing for 
their own food or aafetj. .• . 

Being birds of pasaagu'^ thej are under another iacon* 
veniepce also* which is, that the^ar^ not ab]e to remove 
themselves from 4>ne country to another at tlie usual 
seasob. ' < 

In all these eircumstauces, it is rejported, ih^ yming 
onea assist them, covering them wit|i their' wingSi anil 
nourishing them with* the warmth of their bodies ; even 
bringing them provisions in tiieir beaka^taad carrying 
them from place to place on tlieir backs, or supporting 
them with their wings. ' ^ 

In this manner returning, as much as lies m their power, 
tile oare which wa^ bestowed on them wlien they were 
young oneain the nesl« j/k stt-iki^g example of filkd piety, 
inspired by instiHet $ from whieh, reason itself need not 
be ashamed to tadce example 1 

Honour tliy fatiter and thy mother, that thy days may 
be long in the land which the Lord thy God gtvetii thee, 
was an express commandment, and the only one to v^hich 
a pi'omise was annexed. Among the laraelitea, the slight- 
est offence against a ^ent was puniahed in the most 
(ixemplary manner. , 

Certainly, notliing can be more just or retsonableyihali 
that, we should love, honour^ j|nd suQCoor tbo9e who are 
the very authors of our being,, andli to whose tendfr cart 
(under Heaven) we owe the contimiili^a^f it, during the 
helpless state of our infimcy. 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-^JOOK, NO. I. ifr'J 

^pplieaHon, 

Love, phariiyy and an intercourse of good offices, are 
what we undoubtedly owe to all mankind $ and he that 
onuta them is guilty of such a crime as generally carries 
its punishment with it But to our parents, more, much 
mure, tiian all this is diie ; and when we are serving them, 
we oug^to reflect that, whatever difficulties we go tiiroug^ 
for their sakes, we cannot flb more for them than they 
have done for us ; and that there is no dang^ of our 
overpaying tlie vast debta of gratitude tiiey have laid us 
under. ; , ^ 

In fine, we should consid^ that it is a duty most pecti* 
Jiarly insisted on by heaven itself^ and, if we obey the 
coihmand, diere is np doubt but w^ shall also receive the 
reward annexed to it. 

Never speak ill of any man, but far less in his absence 
than in his prw^ce.. Notiiii^ is more unworthy of a 
man of honour^ than evil speaking. It is,^o far frpm main- 
taining peace among maidd^d, whi^h ou^tq b^ tiie chief 
end of society^ that it ke^ a man in oentinttal broils 
with the world. • 

Listen to tiie affectionate counsels rf your parents ; 
treasure top their pfrecepts; respect their riper judgment f 
^ixd enjoy, with gratitude and delight, the advantages re> 
suiting froin their society. 

Bind to your bosoms, by the most endea^ng ties, your 
blathers and sisters ; cherish them as your best compa- 
Dions through the variegated journey of life : and sttjflbr 
BO jealousies and contentions to interrupt the harmony 
whteh shotdd ever reign fonong you. 



190 JUVENILE 8PELUNG-B0OIC. 

THE FOUR SEASONS* 

* 

Cold ^Winter, wrapt in furs, resigns his s^sat, and turns 
aside his withered face. The smiling countenance of 
Spring succeeds ; when warm, gentle gales begin to blow, 
and soft descending showers moisten the earth. The 
ground is covered with young verdant flowers, 'such as 
the violet, tlic cowslip and the daisy. Thie trees put 
forth green buds, and deck Ijhemselves with blossoms. 

The birds fill every grove with melody, and join in 
pairs to build their little nests, with great industry and 
surprising art, which unlucky boys often destwy. The 
c^r^ful farmer now ploughs his field, casts his gndn into 
the earth, and waits for harvest. Now thife tender latnbs 
skip over the grass in wanton play $ the cuckoo sing^, atid 
universal nature seems to rejoice. 



'<' ForUi in the pleasmg^ springf 



^ ^^€k)d*t beauty waUcB, his teiideniess and Itf'^e^' 
Wide fliuli the fields ; the soft*mfi9 air i» balm*; 
Ecbo the uoantaiitt coand \ the ibrest smi^; 
And every Muse, and every heart is joy .-^^ 

Summer succeeds* Tlie $ttn now darts his beams with 
greater force, and lengthens out the day. The flocks and 
herds, unable to iendurethe scwching heat, retire bene;^h 
the shade of i|omeiatige spreading tree. 

Early in the morning, the careful mower, walking Ibv6i 
with his scythe bn his shoulder, goes into the meadowf 
and widi a .sweeping stroke cuts down tiie grass. Ijiie 
cheerful hay-makers, with fork tnd rake^ soonJoUow hkn. 



t AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASSUEOOK, NO. I. Idl 

They to999 aind turn, and spread the sew -mown haj, or 
ndae it into stacks ^ while the laugh and joke^ and merrj 
^Ak) or song, echo ^ nieadoV nrand. The silent angler, 
eii the riser's brink, betrajs the fishes with his baited 
hook. 

Itot, see . tiK-i face of heaven is overcast I black clouds 
arise, hoarse thunder at a distance first is heard^and soon 
the glaring flash, and loud amazing claps burst over their 
heads, while from tiie teeming clouds tiie sudden shower 
with violence descends. 

;" Then comes thy glory in the summer^monthsy 
With light and heat refulgent. Then thy sun 
Ghooits fall perfection through the swdling year^ 
And oft thy voice in drea^l ihuiider%peflks ; 
And oft) at dawn, deep noon, or ftUiag eve, 
By brooks ajid gxx>ve8,iit hoUow whiqperiog galei.^' 

Autumn comes on. The yellow harvest tempts the 
reaper's sickle, and the glad fanner fills his spacious barn 
with various grain. The sanguine sportsmen now tra- 
verse the fields with various instruments of death. The 
wide spreading liet entangles the flutteiing covey ; whilje 
the fatal gun brings down the frighted partridge, plover, 
or fine plumbed pheasant — r- 

But, hark ! the eiy <^ the hounda and huntsmen strike 
tlie ear ; and, see ! the bounding stag flies over the forests. 
The shifts-and doublings of the timorous hare^ and all the 
cunning tricks of the fox are vain. Now in the tanking 
woods^ the boy with eagerness pulls down tjie clustering 
nat. The mellow orchard now affords its various fruit ; 
peach, plum, neotarine; peari apple^ apricot, or fig« 



192 itJVENlLE SPELLiNO-BOOK. 

The juicy grape swells with its luscious store^ md thft 
large tun oveHIows with generous witie^ Now, too, the 
provident/laborioas bees, are robbed of their winter stock 
of honey hoarded up in waxen cells, and cruelly mui^er- 
ed. But, lo ! tlie rising mists at morn and evening, the 
chilling breeze, the falling leaves, and tiie decayed herb* 
age all around, declare the approach of a m^re surly 
season. . 

It is Winter. The trees are all divested of their leaves, 
and silent birds sit pensive on their naked branches. No 
music gladens the grove, nor verdure clothes the plain. 
The winds blow cold ; the fogs arise ; and the faint sun 
is scarcely s^en or felt. 

The fur and the lined waistcoal supply wailnth to the 
human race j or round the cheerful fire they sit, and talk, 
and laugh, and 8iiig,tvhile'tIirY)iugh the long dark night the 
north wind whistles and the tempest roars. 'Tis keen and 
chilling frost. The powers of nature seem bound up or 
dead. The« waters, all congealed to ice, admit the crowds 
of sliding boys, or bolder youths with skates beneath their 
feet, who swiftly skim around the level surface. 

The snow descends, and covers all the whitened plain. 
The careful farmer feeds his flocks and herds with hay; 
and the thresher in his barn, from mom to night, pursoea 
the flaiPs laborious task, ^ 

« Is winter, awful thov ! wiUi clouclis and storms 
Around Ihee tiupown, tempeitt o'er tempest roUM. 
Majestic darlmess ! on the whirlwind's winj, 
Riding sublime, tJiou bid*?t ihe world adore, 
And humblest nature Avith thy northern bliaat. 
* ^ -- — ■ " ■■ " ■ ' — '^--'-Behold, Ibad maiD) 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. U 193 

8eeh«rethypk!tai^dmi»1 Pass some few yean, m 
' Thy flow^tiag Sprivg, thy Summer's ard^&t streogth^ ^ 

Thy BoW Autumn, fading into a^e, 

And pale concluding Winter oomes at last, 

And shuts the scene.- Ah! whither now are fled 

Those dreams of greatness ! those unsolid hopes 

Of happiness ? those longings alter feme f 

Those restless cares ? those bttsy busflingdays? 
\ Those gay spent festiTe Di«^? those teeriog tbongjitif 

Loet between good and 01, t^at diarM thy Ufe ? 

All now are vanished I Virtue sole survives. 

Immortal never-failing friend of man. 

His guide to hs^ppiacss on high '.''--r—- 

RELIGION THE BEST FEMALt: ACQUIREMENT. 

Without religion no lady's education can be complete. 
Tru^ religion is t^e joint refulgence of ail the virtues. It 
reflembles the 8un» at whose sight all the stars hide their 
diminished heads. It breathes benevolence to man, 

Tlie truly jhous serve Qod, their benefactor, with their 
whole soul, Tliey honour and love liimi not so much fur 
the sake of their promised reward^ as for the benefits tlie j 
liave received) and are more actuated by gratitude thaa 
hope* 

'Iliey Kre severe to themselves, and compassionate to 
others. They endeavour to' reclaim tlie erroneous, not hy 
seventy, but by meekbess. Tliey are always similai* to 
tiiemselvejs, and serve God uniformly, not by fits and 
si'\i*t8. They ate at peace with all men. Th^y comfort 
the afRicled, support the distressed, and clothe the naked. 

They neither exult in prosperity, not sink in adversity, 
Irot remain contented with tiie will of God, and patiently 



194 JUVENILC SPSULIN0-BOOK. 

bear ik«e afflictioas lie is pleased to lay upon them. 
They show their piety not in dieory, but in practice $ not 
in words, but in works. They are not led by fear, am- 
bition, or worldly interest, but by love to the author of 
their being. They strive to promote the good of all men, 
and labour to secure eternal bliss. 

There is moresatirfactionin doing, than receiving good. 
To reUeve tile oppressed, is in some measure jfulfilling the 
duties which Ood required $ and is attended with a plea- 
sure unknown^ but to those who are beneficent and liberal* 

THE APOSTLJC^S dKEED. 

I beKeve in God, th<$ Father Almighty, maker of beaareti 
and earth ; and in Jesus Christ, his only Son, our Lord : 
who was conceived by the Holy Ghost ; born of tiie Vir- 
gin Mary ; suffered under Pontius PUAe ; was crucified, 
dead and buried ; he descended into heU: l£e third day 
^ he rose again from the dead : he ascended into heaven, 
and sitteth at the right hand of God^the Father Almighty : 
from Aence he shall cpme to judge the quick and the dead. 

I believe in the Holy Ghost ; the lioly cattiolic dhurch ; 
the communion of saints ; the forgiveness of sins ; t!ie 
resurrection of the body ; and the life everlasting. Amen. 

THE UNIVERSAL LAW. 

From BarrowU Tourig CkrUtiarCs Library. 

Blessed Redeemer,.how divine, 
How righteous is this rule of thine : 
JVlBver to deal with others worse 
Than we would have tl^m deal tvUh «{/ 



AMKHiCAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOfc, NO. I. T 95 

This golden lesson, sHoi*t and plain, 
Gives not the mind or mem'i-y pain ; 
And evVy conscience must approve 
This universal law of liiw^e. 

^Tis written in each mortal breast, 
Wliere all our teud'i*est wislms rest\$ 
We draw it from our inmost veins. 
Where love to self resides and reigns. 

* Is reason ever at a loss ?— 
Call in self-love to judge the cause ; 
And let our fondest passion show, 
H»w w>e should treat our neig^Dbours too* . 

How ble^t would every nation firovey 
Thus ruFd bj ecpiitj and love ! 
All woultl be friends without a fo^ 
J^i form a paradise below. 

CRUELTT TO AKIMAL8. 

I would not enter on my list of friends 

(l*hottgh grac'd with polished manners and fine senst« 

Yet wanting aenribility) the man 

Who needlessly sets foot upon a worm. 

An inadvertent «tep may crush a snail 

That crawls at e;v'ning in the public path $ 

But he tliat has bumanity, for^warn'd. 

Will tread aside, and let the reptile live. 

For they arc all, the meanest things that are^ 

As free to live and to enjoy that life. 

As God was free to form them at the first. 

Who in hia sovereign wisdoin jnade thi^ all. 



196 JUVENILE PPKLLTNG-BOOK. 

THE LORD'S PRAYER, 

naMomea ue inn name; inn kcnaclom 

come} tnu mdi ue- done on eatthy 04 tt 

14 i/n neaven: qcve iM int4 emu oar dculu 

^xsddj and j^omive iM oar tte4ha44e4^ a4 

me %otatve ino^e^ nmo its4fm4i^iffM4,i%4i U4f 

ana iead U4 noi 0^ teihiiaium; Sut 

tleuver U4 vtom evic^ £w mtnt u mt 

mnadom, amd me homer , and me Q^ohM) 

£or e/viep and ever. t^rmen. 
GRACE BEFORE MEaLS. 




U mv tt$<> mh Vi$ t0 Ws;'$ix^' 
vu^, mm^ §ii$V($ ^%pf$t 

J 



Xmeeican schoco. clas3-boo«; no. l 197 

THAlNfKS AFTER MEALS. 

<© St$tb-, for tfti^ anti alltfip otfter W^§^ 
in^^ l^e^totoeb upon n§, tfroug]^ ^e^u^ 
C|jn>'i: our Eorii* 9Ilmett» 

DECLARATION, OF CONGRESa 

^^ Wft \\olA the^e truths to \)e m\jCr 
e^idijnat^ t\\at all laeti axe e^eated. 
equal*, that t\ve^ aT^i enda^Pfed T>]j 
i\\e,TC (jireatoTt Vf itli cei^tain \iua\ieiia-* 
W^ Tights <, that aDdong thesis, aire 
lilievliheYt^, and tlie'-jfTOamt ol Itia]^-* 
iplnees*''** TMa ia the lang^i^e ol 
^meiclca^ ot l^^eaaon^ aiad ol TiJuth* 

EDUCATION. 

It is it tompanion which no mis/orHmes can de* 
preHS — no chnie destroy-^r^o memy alienate-^Hto 
.despotism enslave, At home a frtrnd-^^xbroad on 
introduction-^n '. solitude a solace^^n soc-iety an 
' ornament. It chastei^ vice^^t guides virtue^t 
gives at once a, grace and government to gmitis. 
rVithoid it what is man? A splendid slave! a rea^ 
soning $avagef vaciBating between the dignity of 
an iftteUigence derived from God, and the degrades 
iion of passions participated with brutes; and m 
the accident cf their al^maie ascendancy^ shudder^ 
ing at the terrours of an hereafter^ or hugging tii4 
horrid hope of a m t hi kl i o9k philips. 



JUVENILE SPELUNG'BOOK. 

Munes of Perions. 



196 



•Umt vifttur. ft fcw will mfiw. Tb* aasM of lUtM, kn^duaa. amrim, cttict. tamm, mmt, 
kkM, te«ai>ttln«, Im. may,/a (tMnd, be •oquircd wub nora Mauraoy Tmib ami*. (voKnpbMC, f«« 
9mtni tuNunet, Im. thu <r«m tW j«ff*i of » iiMhiaf-book.* A brief iaCnMliKtiQa U> the am 
■»rf iiiiMipi, iMiwlWv ib« plMa«n«a«r Htrar^ Mid Cb« •ararWi eT Eiiftab {!««>"«»? m« ioMrtrd 
■I th*ir MMHi, whioh it k bclMvtd, will bt muf« ■ocepubb U iMtrueiMt, aiid iMta beMficwi |» 



Chrirt 

Hugh ^ 

Job 

John 

Jude 

Luke 

Mark 

Paul 

Miles 

Charles 

Greorge 

Jane 

Ruth 

Seth 

Ralph 

Aa ron 

A'bei 

Ad' am 

Ar bert 

AF len 

Al'fred 

A'mos 

Ar' thur 



Accentcdf 

An' drew 
Am' brQSe 
Caleb 
CsbI' sar 

Cy TUB 

Be/nard 
Da' vid 
Dan'iel ' 
Ed' mund 
Ed'^ard 
Ed' win 
Esth' er 
E" noch 
Em' ma 
Eg^bert 
Fran' ces 
Fran' cis 
God' fry 
Han' nah 
Hum phrey 
Hel' en 
Hen' ry - 
Fsaae 



Ja' cob 
Jo'^ph 
Jo' nas 
Jo' el 
Jes' se 
Lu'cy 
JLeW is 
Leon' ard 
LaV rence 
Ma' ry 
Mai^ tha 
Mat' thew 
Mo'ses 
Na' than 
Ai^ nold 
Aus' tin 
Ash er 
A'sa 
A' saph 
Brad^ford 
Gil' bert 
Le'vi 

Ja'beas 



^ SOT nnnr wwo^WfMKKt 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOIC, NO. I. |99 




1 ^?C 

Nim' rod 
No' all 
Nan'cy 
Ow' en 
Phe'be 
Phil' ip 
Pe' ter 
Ra' chel 
Reu' ben 
Rich' ard 
Rob^ert 
Sa' rah 
St' mon 
Ste' phcii 
Tbom' as> 
Wal' ter 
Will' iam 
An' tho ny 
A mitn'da 
Ab' i gail 
Ar^ chi bald 
A' bra bam 
Bai^ ba ra 
Ben' ja min 
Be Im' da 
Car' o line 
Cath' a rine 
Claris aa 



Chris' to pb^r 
£ raa' tu3 
Cyp' ri an 
Bac^ na has 
Ich' a bod 
U rr all 
Ur Stt' la 
Er e nor 
Nap' tha li 
Tab itha. 
Eli'hu 
Ab' sa lorn 
Ce' li a 
Delia 
Deb' o rah 
Dor' b thy • 
Em' i ly 
Eli'za 
Fred' er ic 
Ga' bri el 
Gid e on • 
Gre^ o ry 
Har^ ri et 
Is' a bel 
Josh' u a 
Jo 8t' ah 
Ju' li a 
Jon' a than 
Lem' u el 

Lyd' i a 

S 



Ln cin'da 
Ma rif a 
Ma til' da 
Mar^garei 
Mi' cha el 
Mor^ de cai 
Nich o las 
01' iv er ^ 
Phin' e as 
Pris cil' la 
Re hed ca 
Sam' u el 
Sim' e on 
So ph? a 
Su san^nah 
Sd' o mon 
Tim' o thy 
The' o dore 
Val' en tine 
A me' fi a 
An gel' i ca 
E liz' a betb 
A lex an^ d^r 
E ze' ki el 
Hen ri et' ta 
Lu ere' ti a 
Ho ra' ti o 
Hez e ki' ah 
Ju li an' na 
Jeremi'db 



200 



Jin^ENILE SFELLING-BOCm:.. 



Exercises in DeripoHon. 

9^ DerivaJUon shows how deriTative words aredecKioed fram 
their priinitiTee. The following; may exhibit to the learner scAne no- 
tion of this principle ; but the author refers the instmcter to the Ju- 
veniie Expotitor, it which he will find namerons exercises^ calculated 
to lighten his Is^boorsy and improve the |k^pil in an important branch 
of elementary eduoation. 

Primitive words with two terminations.' 

art' fill* art' less t 

heed fill heed less 

need fill need less 

grace fill grace less 



Art 
heed 
need 
grace 

Chill 
snow 
gloss 



chill ing X 
snow ing 
gloss ing 



chiUyll 
showy 
gloss J 



Bad 

rash 
bold 

high 

plain 

^reat 

weak 

coarse 



bad ly 5 
rashly 
boldly 
high Iv 
pkinly 
great ly 
weakly 
coarse ly 



bad ness *^ 
rashness 
bold n^ss 
high ness 
plain ness 
great ness 
weakness 
coarse ness 



Joy 

SiQ 

awe 

Earn 
ope 
care 



joy fill * 
sin fill 
aw fill 

Sain fill 
ope fill 
care fill 



joy fiillyH 
sin fill ly 
aw fill hr 

Sain fill ly 
opeibHy 
care fid ly 






ithi 



if. 



* c 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CI.ASS-POQK, NO. L 20f 



Wh Words en^Dg^ in or or cr and ee : the former denot^is the agent 
or actor, and the latter, the person to whom an act is done. 



Pay . 

Jbail 
A vov/ 
in dorse' 
Mort' gage 
o blige 
as sign' 



pay er 
bail' or 
a. vow' er 
in dors er 
Mort* ga ger 
o bli' ger 
as sign er 



pay ee 
bail ee' 
a vow ee' 
in dors ee' 
mort ga gee' 
ob' li gee 
as sign ee' 



Cred' it 
as sail' 
ad vise 
man' age 
com mind' 



PriJoitlTe wotdB tH^ two tonnuuRJtions. 

cred' it or * cred' it a ble t 
as saiF er as sail' a ble 
ad vi ser ad vise a ble 

man' a ger man' age a ble 
com mend' er com'mend'able 



Pa' rent 
person 
ob serve' 
en tice 
per form 
com mand 



paretif alj: 
pei^ son al 
ob serv' er * 
en ti cer 
per form er 
com mand er 



pa' rent age {| 
per son age 
ob sery' ance {) 
en tice mmit 
per form ance 
commandment 



« ' " » 



De cide' 
res pect 
con elude 



de ci' sivej: de ci' sive ly J 
re spect ive re spect ive ly 
con clu sive con clu sive ly 



*er«r or ticMtM te acior. 
^{it;e. 2 denote* qoftiity. 



It i 



TtotvfBiintioii 

t abUt dcnotts ^uftlftj 

Sage, ) 
ance, > dflii|tM tUta er toaditioB. 



202 JUVENILE SPELLING-BOOK, 

Verbs formed from otlier ^prds, by the termination ite* 

CWil civ'ilize 

hu man h u man ize 

meth o«t meth od ize 

jour nal • jour nal ize 

sol emn . &^ol em nize 

Primiture words ending in c, have ian (ngmfpog pc^fe^sion) .adcl^d 

for their dcriv'afivea. 

Mu' sic* mu si' ci^ ^ 

^^ gic » ^^ g' cian 

phys ic phj si cian 

lo gic lo gi cian 

Some verbs ending in li^ dian«pc 5e into pj before theterminoCioli Hon,' 

Pre scribe' pre scrip' tion 

in scribe in. scrip tion 

pro scribe pro scrip tion 

transcribe transcription 

6u per scribe su per scrip' tion 

Words ending itpf denote coaditioa or power. 

A'ble abirity 

in firm in firm i ty 

mor al mo ral' i ty 

le gal le gal i t v 

pos si ble pos si bii i ty 

Priastiye ifrords ending in t^ hare ion added for their derlvafives. 



Afflict' 


af flic' tion 


• 


re fleet 


re flee tion 




re ject 


re jcc tion 




cor rect 

m * 


cor rec tion 

— '^ 


t 






AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. L 2Q3 

Some primitiTe worda ending; in mQ, drop the t, and take «non for 

' th^ <^rii^ve»b . 

Permitl "^ per mis' sion 
remit re mis sion 

ad hut ad mis sion 

stiSmit sub this sion 

com mit ' com mis sioh 

PrimkiTe Urordi ending in le^ciiange the e into ionf for their derivafiyea. 

Translate' trans la' tion 

im'i tate' iih i ta tion 

sep a rate sep a ra tion 

lib er ate lib er a tidii 

med i tate med i ta tion 

I'rinutiv^ -woroB ending in de, change the teruinfttion mto nrni in (heir 

derivatiTes. - 

Evade' ' ' eva'sion 

de lude de Ju sion 

in trade in tni sion 

ex plode ex plo sion 

Primitive wounds ending in ^, hare ton added for their derivative!. 

Ag gress' ' ag gress' ion 
pro fess pro fess ioai 

pos ses^ pos sess ion 

im press im preto ion 

compress compression 

'Noi>is ending in (^ become adjectires by changing <jf into cut* 

Ra pa"ci ty ra pa' dous 

sa ga ci ty » sa ga cious 

te na cH ty te na cious 

ca pa ct ty ca pt cious i 



20i JUVENILE SPELUNG^BdOK. 

Terms E^lained. 

INITIALS. 

S^TThe iniiiaU tm, (lu, tmy tn, iff ngnify ^e same as not, or i^tb- 
out, or WR&t of. Thus, unldiad, meaos not kind ; unkutdnieflSy want 
of kindkiesB ; dii^onest, not honsst } dbhonesty, withoat bonesty i iB|- 
patieittt, not patifxvt ; iiiatteotive, not attentive ; Irreg^ar, not reg^air. 

Xis sig^ames ill, or wrong:; as, mtsmana^ to manage ill; tniscaB, 
to name improperly ; misbeiiavioar, bad behaviour. 

Rt sometimes means backward.^, and aometimestt meads agfain ; as, 
retam, to turn, or co»e bark ; remind, to bring to mind again; re- 
call, to call again, to call back. 

Co or eon si<^ifies with or together. Thus, to condole, Boyaanc to 
lament with another; tfi connect, to join together. 

Pre signifies before. Thus, prefix, means to place bHbre. 

Out signifies excess, excellency or 8upe^iorlty.^ Thus, to outnuni* 
lifir, to exceed m number; tootttB^ine, to excel in lustre } too«twit, 
^ to overcome by stratagem. 

Op^ signifies eminence, or superiority. Thus, to overcome, nu 
to gain the superiority ; to overrul ^ to be superior in authority. 

Sunm- signifies upon, over, or .above. Thus to superatruct, 
to build uppn any thing; to su])erad(), to add over and above. 

iiUtr signifies between. Th ''s, to intervene, signifies to dbaae be- 
tween. ItalsosignifimBAgation; as, to interdict, meant to forfa^ 

Fope signifies lwlbre| or beforehand. Thxa^ to foretell, means to 
teU beforehand. 

TVoM sig&ifiei oyer, or beyoud. Thua, to traaqport, neaos to 
carry over ; to transgress, to go beyond. 

Z>€8^;nifieB9rkindof moUoafinm. Thns, to depart, meant tore* 
tir^firom. 

ComUer ngnifies agamst. Thus, to countermand, meant to evder 
the oontranr of what wa^ ordered before. 

Ujp stgnines above, upwards or upper with respect to thingn or 
places that lie upwards. Thus, to uplift, 'to raise aloU; upland, 
hlglierland. ^ 

JVith signifies against, from or back. Thus, to withstand, means 
to stand against ; to withdraw, to draw back. 

Cinum signifies aboi^t. Thtt% circumlocution, meant a RNini- 
ftbottt way of speaking. ' 

Antt means before. Thus, antedate, meant to date befo#eiiaDd. 

Anti signifiet >aeaiiut* Thut. antidote, meant k r«B«df miaH 
poitoii. 



AM£Rld!iN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK:, NO. I. 205 

» 

Words Contrasted. ^ 



tyWordb in which the meaniiigs of the preceding imtisila are inr- 
tfaer exemi^ed. For a fuller elacidatlon of this article, see the /u- 
vmiU Expositor. 



Appear, to be viable. 
Allow, to permU. 
Oblige, to bind, {dease. 
Apply, to pttt to use. 
Obey, to yield, comply. 
Behave, to conduct one^ self. 
Deceire, to delude, mock. 
Opyatey to prodace effects. 
Guga^ to employ, fi^ 
Number, to count, teU, reckon. 
Take, to receive, take. 
Assure, to promise, pled«;e. 
Add, to join together. 
Weave, to form by texture. 
See, le, look, observe. 
Plant, to put into the ground. 
Compose, to put together. 
Act, to perform, do. 
Hold, to seiae, grasp« 
Stand, to maintain gnnrnd. 
Jacent, lying at length. 
Date, at the time when* 
Monarchy, kingdom, empire. 



ifii-appear^ nof to appear, 
ififf-allow, TtoMo allow. 
<ft«-obl%e., noi to oblige* 
fnts-apply, net to app^. 
ifif-obey, noi\0 obey., 
mir-behave, noi to behave. 
vA^^Uceivc, noi to deceive, 
co-operate, to work together^ 
;»rc-engage, to engage b^fiitditmd* 
otd-number, to exeeed in number. 
0ver-take, to come up to, 
re-assure, to assure again, 
super-add, to add orer and dbote, 
tn/tfr-weave, to wefeve beheeen, 
fore-tieef to see beforehand, 
/rant-plant, to plant in a newplt^c, 
dc'CompooOy to separate fram« ^ 
counier-'f^tt, to act against, 
i^hold, to hold up, 
fMlft*siand, to stand agaidM. 
rtrsum-jaoent, lying rotmd aboyi, 
on/e-date, to date beibre. 
on^monarchy, eigoitis^ monarchy. 






■ OV CAPITA!. LETTB&8. 

tagiB«k1i»M||itallf»tt«wAlM> •vwyUB* ia poatiy. 



ao6 



iWlSSfLE SrCLLING-B(k)X 



Words of the a&nie accentiiatjoq, uped boUi as nomn and ve^ 

'' M** The haiwr btvfof iMtn ondMd mnrelf ia ipsniar (ht vordi u ftirufid ia tbt fia* 
«rtii^V*'torth«boo|E,witb«atkttaekiaf «j9aMuiactotlMai.lM it h<re p rwmte d with aoiat ■»■ 
afcpfcdktety I mwm t. ia wMoh Iw aML7 bt rwpk^te ipJH tbt nrwdt «wd wcto <bdr w i rtngi * la 
■iviV Ami U tMlil* tiw Mdwr reoomntadi that ibij (bwild «l«Wf • ba imdtd iato nDall perti«a^ 
Ml w BO MCttno ka nftda of niah |aog<]i as to croato fttigve, or d^rtat the popil. 



Ad dress', 

•—to speak or write to. 

Ad vance, 

■ ' pr o creMto D, Siicreaie. 
t^wto prefer, improre. - 

. Affray, 

»-*oiittmL distuiiiSQice., 

At fright, 

•-^^terfonr, fear. 
•--^ scare, terrify. 

Appeal, 

' •'•-oriUiig for jttatioe. 
•«-4o refer to anoth^. 

Array,/ 

t-'dresa^ order of battle, 
9m^ put in oirder, dec]^ 

As sault, 

»-*4tonii, attack. 
•*-to set or ^ iiptti. 

As sent, • 

»^*ittw act ef .agreong. ' 
o-<4o agree^^coiiseot. . 

At tack, > 

s^-assault, onset, charge. 
iH'-to fall upon, encocS^« 

•* At tempt, 

f--4rial. endeavour, eifl^orf . 
• 9-*4o tiy, endeavour, essay. 



At test, 

s — evidence, testinicmy. 
V — ^to bear witness, affirm.* 

A vail, 

s--pro(k, advdsla^e, beneHt. 
V — ^to prosper, assist, promote. 

Award, 

8 — sentence, detcrmiifation. 
t<— to adjnd^e, d^termiofl) gife. 

Ca bal, 

* — a private junto pf tacn. 
i* — to inirig^e.prlvat^yf plot. 

Com pact, 

^'''bargain, set, a^re^mtpnt* 
V — to join together. 

De feat, 

5— overthrow, deprrvatioi*. 
tw^to ront, destroy, disappoint* 

Dis charge, ' 

s — dismis8i<H)5 eicplbsion. 
V — to dismiss^ pay, unload. 

De feet, 

s-~erromV fa%|lt^ blemish. 
V — ^to be deficient or wanting. 

Dis grace, 

S'—duhonour, loss of fame* 
v^-tf> degx^i dismiss. 

Dis play, 

s— setting to view, ezliibition. 
ih^to shonpr, exhtt^t, 8pr««4* 



* « ii nt htfoTB worit whwiiMd 






AMEniCAN SCHOOL 

At tire, * 

•—clothes, apparel, drees. 
V — to dress, array, deck. . 

9 — dress te deceive, pretence. 
t><— to.QOBceal, dis^g^ure. 

Dis tre8$^ 

s — misery, act of di^trsuiUBg. ■ 
t>— to hdra^ perplex. 

Dis praise^ 

t->blaine, couure, disgrace. 
t>-^o coiideinn, lessen. 

Desert, 

i — merit, wortb, reward. 
V— 4oX9rsake, leaT«, quiL 

Dis tradt, 

f-4oBs of oonfideBCfl. 
#.-4adisbellef«,|(Mur. 

Di rotce^^ 

•— e^Nkratioii iamaMiage. 
»— to sMarate, pnt airay. 

Effect, 

f-«ooiiieqfi«nce, end, isHe^ 
v«-*to bring tsk pass, perfiaorm. 

EiS cslEipe, 

e-^tting clMT, %fat. 
V — to av<Sd, itkvi^ nee. 

Esteem, 

«-^igfa taliie, reepeet; 
think well o^ prize. 

De file, 

narrow passage, lane. 
V — to pollute, corrupt, taint. 

Neg lect, ^ 

•^-omission) ooldaess. 
•-•-to omit, disregard. 

Pro teed. 

S-— prodnce, amount, profit. 
V — ^lo go on, take effect. 



CLASS-rdoK:, no. i. 207 
Dis pute, . 

f •^-contest, debate, controversy. 
9r- to contend^ oppose, wrangle^ , 

Dis sent, 

»— diffei*ence in opinion. 
« — ^to disagree,, differ. 

De coy, 

»~aIlar^eDt to mischief. 
V — ^to mislead, allure, entrap. 

Re coil, 

f — ^rebound, motion backwards. 
iH~to rush back, shrink. 

Recruit, 

>--« new enlisted soldit ". . 
^r^, supply, repUu^t. 

, Ke |>ose$ 

t -sleep, quiet, rest. 
V — ^to lay tn rest, place. . 

' Reproach, 

« — censure, blame,- diigrac*. 
t — \o upbraid, condemn. 

Re search, ' 



diligent seardi. 
t>— to exgmiune again. 

Re serve, 

9 — a store untouched. 
4^-40 keep in store, lay up.* 

Re solve, 

«— A determination, design. 
' V — to determine, dissolve. 

Re suit, 

f — ^flying back^ ceo$equeQce. 
V — ^to fly baek, follow, accrue. 

Re tort, 

t — a t;en9ure returned. 
I? — ^to throw or turn back. 

Re verse, 

t— tbe opposite side, diange. 
V — *b invert, overturn, repe^^ 



208 



jm&nLE SPELLUtG-BOOK 



. Re gard, 

g ^'to esteem, respect, value. 

A mount, 

m total, tlie -wiiole. 
, raise in value, inereaae. 

De sire, 

w^^h, eai^emess to obtain* 
tw4o beg, eatrea^ adi. 



De lay, 

stop) staj', lundraiic4. 
V-— to defer, put off, detaia« 

De mise, 

f— death, decease, will. 

V — to bemielath at one's dtMtJk 

Ke dress, 

f — relief amends^^'reiAed^. 
« — ^to set rigbt, r^eve. 



When tlw fi^Qffvin^ words are used as nouns, tiieyareaceiaifedai 
the first sgilable, Irat oo the second when verhs. 



Ab straet, 



tH-tosepar«tey takefroBL 

Ac cent, 

nnrk on n word Q 
' place the accent. 

Col lect, 

short prayer. 
9-4o gather, reoovtr, i&ler. 

Com ment, 

•-»«n esplanation. 
iK-40 aacplain, write notesu 

•JSpcmnd, 

•— ^ituirtitre. 
th^4o mingle, ihix. 

Con.duet, 

•-^behaviour, discratiott. 
t>— 4o lead, guide, manage^ 

Con fliet, 

>— a contest, struggle. 
»^-to fic^ contesVwive* 

Con fine, 

•^-CkliaBit, border, edge. 
»«r|o tie up^ ^ border. 



Con cert, . . 

band of laasic. 
v-*to contrive^ agree nratoaUjfw 

Cop tract. 



v—tD shrink up j bargain. 

Con tfsiBt^ 

«-»«n opiiesitioQydifeme* 
iH-to ji»ct in oppositko. 

. Con vict, 

#^-^31 person convicted. 
i^-4o prove gially, detect 

Con roy, 

»— attendance fcr detect. 
t^— to attend k>t defence* 

Dis count, 

ff— abatementy aUowaaoe* 
e— to deduct, pay back. 

En trance, 

t— a going in, a passage, * 
v'--'to throw into atranoa* 

Es say, 

s*-atrial attempL 
I v-'^to endeavour, eaamiae. 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLABS-BOOK, NO, I. 20^ 



Con test^ 

dispute, quarrel. 
V — to strive^ vie with. 

Consult, 

f|— ^ act of consulting, 
jv^— to 9Mk advice, debato. 



In cense, : 

porliune. 
»T-to proYoke^ eprago, itir i^ 

Im port; 

V — ^to brin^; irpin abroa4> 



The fellowbo* are tued both as noniu and 



San' doni, 

f — hazard, chanoe, rajage. 
•*---doDe by clianco. 

Rus tic, 

#— «t cloMnti) countryman, 
a— TuraL ^aiui cloivnish. 

Se cret, 

»~-a tfamg unknown. 
a-H»»icealed, private. 

Va gratit, 

•—a beggar, a pauper. 
«— wanderiqg, roving. 



Utmost, 

s-HDost that can be. 
A-^higfaest, most. 

. Ruffian, 

s-^B. brutal feUow, n>bbe|^ 
a— 4}kittal, savage, feroci«m| 

Sav age, 

#<-a barbarian, brafal maib 
or^wild. cruel, barbaroa^ 

Major, 

«— «ai officer in the army* ^ 
a— first, greater, cMef. / 



The following are used bcfth as adjectiret and Terbi* 



Ex empf , 

tfx-^jGfee by privilege, Iree. 
1^— to privilege, set frer. 

E rect, 



upright. 
v—te buHil qr set up, raise* 

Im merse, 

«— l>itried, sunk deep. 
v^'-to pat und^r water. 

Al tei^ nate, 

«--by turns in successioii* 
i^-"tb perforin bjtams^ 

Exf pe dite, 

a— active, rMdy^ qtdck. 
' > hasten, fecSitate. 



m§m 



■ I ■■»» " ' 



• •iiMidto 



Ex press, 

o^lain, dear, All. 
9— to declare, represeat* 

For ward, ^. 

is^warm, ready, bold. 

9-^-40 hs^Ub, quickeo, wStfdMki 

Lev el, 

o-^even, plain, smooth* 
v^to make flat, lake aiHl* 

Ut ter, 

( H" oii(t#ayd, eztreiii6« 
v-^lo ipeak, say. pobttdib 

Artie ulati^ 

0, distinct fa speedk 

V"— to praMnmoe, tiy s wfc 

ei * <i n «ii 






210 



JUVENILE SPELLING-BOOK. 



Weirdly nearljr the nmie in tonnd, but different in spoUing and e^goifi- 

catioo. 



Accidence, a book 
Accidents, chances 
Acoeiint, value 
Acoooipt, reckoning 
Acts, exploits 
Axe, a hatchet. 
Ail, to be sfck 
Ale, malt liquor 
Hail, jto salute 
Hail, frozen rain 
Hale, robust 
Air, to breaU>e 
Meir, to an estate 
Hair, of the iiead 
Hare, an animal 
All, vC very one 
Awl, -ta bore with 
Hall, a laU^c room 
'Haul, to pull, dnrw 
Allowed, granted 
Aloud, wiUi a noise 
Altar, lor sacrifice 
Alter, to change 
Ant, an emmet 
Aunt, parentis. sister 
Ascent, going up 
Assent, agreement ' 
Assistance, help 
Assistants, helpers 
Augur, a soothsayer 
Ay^r, a tool - 
Bail, a surety 
Bule^targe parcel 
Bail, a sphere 
Bawl, to cry out 
Beaa, a Ibp • 
Bow, to shoot with 
Bear, *> carry 
Bear, a. beast ' ^ 
Bare, naked, plai^ 
Base, mean, -v&« 
BaiSy in muiic 
Bt^ Itiuidatioa 



^ » 



Bf», the verb 
Bcc, an insect i 
[leer, drink, porter 
Bier, a<iarriage for the 

dead 
Beat, to strike, throb 
Beet, a garden root 
l>ell, to ring, sound 
Belle, a, young lady 
Berry, a small fi-uit 
Bury, to inter, hide 
Blew, did blow - 
Blue, a colour 
Boar. male«wine 
Bore, *o make a hole 
Bore, did bear 
Bolt, a fastening 
Boult, to sift medl 
Bread, bake<t dour 
Bred, brought up 
Burrow, a hole m the 

earth 
Borough,a corporation 
By, near at hand 
Buy, to purchase 
Bye, indirectly 
Brews, breweth 
Braise, to brea]( 
But, except, more 
Butt, two bogheads 
Calendar, almanac 
Calender, to smooth 
Cannon, a great gun 
' Canon, a law, rule 
Canvas^ coarse cloth 
Canvass, to examine 
Cart, a carriage 
Chart, a map d coasts 
Cell, a cave, hut 
Sell, to dispose of 
Cellar, under grouifd 
Seller, one who sells 
Censors lor hiceuse 



Censor, a critic 
Cekisure,^ blame 
Centaury, an herb 
Century, 100 years 
Oholer, anger, wrd.th 
Collar, lor the neck 
Ceiling, of a eochq 
Scaling, of a letter 
Clause, otz. sentence 
Claivs<^a- bird or beast 
Coarse, not fine^ xough 
Course, a race, way 
Complement, the re- 
mainder 
Compliment to speak 

politely 
Concert, of music 
Consort, a companioa 
Cousin, s^ reladoa ^ 
Cozen, to cheat, tricjc 
Council, an assembly 
Counsel, advice, art 
Cruise, ^to sail up and 

down 

Crews, ship's compa- 
nies 

Currant, small fmii 
Current, a stream 
Creek, of the sea 
Creak, to make a noise 
Cygnet,, a young swan 
Signet, a seal, aga 
Dear, of great value 
peer, an animal 
Dew, moisture 
Due, owii^, fit 
Descent, gc»ng down 
Dissent, to diaagre* 
pependance, trust 
Dependants,' those who 

are subject 
Decease, demise 
Disease, disorder ^ 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CBASS-BOOK, NO. I. 211 



Dou^)^ paste 
Done, perfprnMd 
Dun, a colour 
Draught, of drink 
Draft, dniwing 
Urn, a vessel 
Earn, togain by labotir 
Eminent, noted 
Inuninent, impending 
Ewe, a female sheep 
Yew, a tree 
Hew, to cat, chop 
Hue, colour, dye 
Hugh, a man's name 
Eye, to see with 
I, myself 
Fain, •desirous 
Fane, a temple 
Feign, to dissemble 
Faint, weary, low 
Feint, pretence 
Fair, handsome 
Fare, charge 
Fare, food 

Feet, part of the body 
Feat, exploit 
Fir, a tree 
Far, of a skin 
Flee, to run away 
Flea, an insect 
Flew, did fly 
Flue, of a chimney 
Flour, for bread 
Flower,of the field 
Forth, abroad, out 
Fourth, the number 
Frays, quarrels 
Phrase, a sentence 
Creature, actigo 
Jester, a joker 
Gilt, with gdd 
Guilt, sin, crime 
Grate, for fire 
Ore|t, largci chief 



Grater, Sac nutmeg . 
Greater, la^rger 
G^oan, a deep sigh 
Grown, increased 
Guefs, to think 
Guest, a visiter 
Hart, deer, stag 
Heaxi, seat of life 
He^, to cure 
Heel, part of the foot 
Hear, the sense 
Here, in this place 
Heard, did hear 
Herd, cattle, flock 
Hie, to haste 
High,lofty 
HAn, firomhe 
Hymn, a song 
Hole, a cavity 
Whole, not broken 
Hoop, for a tub 
Whoop, to halloo 
Host, a great number 
Host, a landlord 
Idle, lazy, trifling 
Idol, an image 
Aisle, of a c^urdi 
Isle, an island 
Impostor, a cheat 
^posture, deceit 
In, within, not out 
(nn, a public house 
Incite, to stir up 
Insight, knowledge . 
Indite, to dictate 
lidict, to accuse 
Ingenious, skilfvl 
Ingenuous, frank 
Intense, excessive 

Intents, purpoaf9 
Kill, to muI^Ser 
Kiln, of bricks 
Knave, a rogue 
Nave^ of a ^eel 



jNeed, want, dStibctm 
Knew, did know 
New, not old 
Knight,a title ofhonotpr 
Night, darkness 
Key, for a lock 
Quay, a whar^ dock 
Knot, to untie 
Not, denying 
Know, to understand 
No, not, not any 
Leak, to run out ' ^ 
Leek, a kind of oaioii 
Lease, a demise ' 
Lees, secjiment 
Lead, soft metal 
Led, conducted 
Lessen, to make les 
Lesson, in reading 
Lo, behold, look 
Low, mean, humble 
Lore, learning 
Lower, more low 
Made, finished 
Maid,a'nrgin 
Main, chie^ heed 
Mane, of a horse 
M^e, he' 
Mail, armour 
Mail, post-coedi 
Manner, custom , 
Manor, a lordship 
Marshal, agenerei 
Martial, warlike 
Mean, 1o^, sofdiA 
Mean, to intend 
Mien, bdiaviour 
Mea^ flesh, food 
Meet, fit, proper 
Mete, tomeainre . 
Meipage, errand 
Meemage, a how 
Metal, subftaim 
Mettle, vigour 



Kneadi to work dough JMIght| pewec 
T 



&12 



JUVENO^ STELI^m^OCOL 



MiteyaninsMt 
Moaga, laniftntation 
Mown, cut dffwn 
Moat, a ditch, hole 
Mote, Spot in the eye 
Mortar, to pour^l in 
Mortar, made of lime 
Mublln, &ie cloth 
Moahni^, tying the 

tflOkouth 
. Naught, corrupt 
Nocight, nothing 
NaVf denying 
Keigh, as a horse 
Nooee, a knot, trap 
New8,tiding8, accounts 
Oar, to row with 
€>re, uncast metal 
(Hy beloogiog to 
Off, %t a difltanoe 
0*1, alan I 

pwe, to be indebted 
One,4n munber 
Won, ^id win 
Our, of va 
Hour, mty minnteB 
Pail, bucket, vessel 
Pale, &Jnt colour 
pain, torment, toil 
"Cane, sqaare of g^ass 
P^,^ two things 
pare, tof>eel^ co^ 
Pear,, A fruit 
Palate, of the moutli 
Pallet, a painter's 

board 
pastor, a minister 
Pastorei grazing land 
patience, miklnest 
«Patien&| sick people 



Peace, quietncn iSore^^tRHBid' 
Piece, a part, patch ^Sorne, a pavt^noiautfy 



Peer, a nobleman 
Pier, of a bridge 
Pillau*, a oolumn 



8um,a»oniit 
Stra^fat, direct 
Strai^ narrow 



Pillow, to lay the head Sweet, not sour 



on 

Pint, half a quart 
Point, a sharp end 
Place,,sitU3tion 
Plaice, a fish 
Pray, to beseech 
Prey, booty, {dander 
Precedent, ejcample 
President, goTemor 
Principal, due^ head 
Principle^ rule, cau^ 
Raise, to lift, stir up 
Rays, beams of light 
Raiisin, dried grape 
Reason, axgumoit . 
Relic, remainder 
Relict, a widow 
Right, juflit, tme 
Rite, ceremiHDy 
Sail, of a ship 
Sale, act of selling 
Salary, wage9 
Celery, ap herb 
Scent, a Amell 
Sent, ordered anray 
Sea, the ocean 
See, tp view, look 
So, thqs, provided 
Sow, to cast seed 
Sew, with a needle 
Sole, al<me, lonely 
Sole, of the foot 
Soul, the spirit 
Soar, to xQount 



Suite, attendants 
Siirpttcie, white robe 
Surplus over and a- 

beve 
Subtile, ibe, Obii 
Subtle, cunning 
Talente, good paiti 
Talons, daws, nails 
Team, of hones 
Teem, to cwerflow 
Tenorjr intent, purpart 
Tenure, occupatioii 
Their, belonging to 

tfaeiB 
There, in that place 
Threw, did throw 
Through, all along 
Thjrme, an herb 
Time, leisure 
Treaties, QonvenOoBf 
Treatise, diaooucae 
Vain, foolish 
Vane, a weatheroocfc 
Yein, a blood-vessel 
Vial, a small bottle 
Viol, a fiddle 
Walt, to stay, attend 
jWeight, fiyr scales 
IWare, merchandise 
UWear, toputon 
Way, road 
Wei^ in scales 
Week, seven daj* 
Weak^ fiuat^ weaiy 



90r f%e fiMt ^ (kit SpeUing-lBooky eomprinng ^emehUuy tnm^ 
fc%<; ^pttuHiar importance shotM be committed to memory at tar^f oi 
"Wm fmiw ^ U m§mi'onktiifiitwiafti$ea9ae»y0 read impr«M>. ' 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. I. 213 ^ 

Brirf hirodwition to th^ Arts and Sciences , including EoBpiS^ 
' naUtms of some of the Phenomena of Naiwte 

I. wfgrtru^ure.— Agricnlture, the moet useful and important o| , 
all pursuits*, teaches the nature of soils, and their proper adaptation 
sod manageHient i»x the production of food for m'<m and beast. 

S. Aiu — The air is a transparent, invisible, elastic fluid, suf* 
rounding; the earth to the height of 'several miles, it contains th» 
principles of life' and. vegetation ; and is ipund by experonent to \» 
«^t hundred tin^Mi lighter than water. 

3. Anaiemy. — ^Anatomy is the art of dissecting the human body 
, when dead, and of examining and arranging it? parts ; in order to dit* 

cover the nature of diseases, and promote the knowledge of mediciM 
aod sui^ery. 

4. 'Ardiiieeture, — ^Architecture is the art of plannin? and erectiii0» 
* all sorts of buildings, according to the best models. A contains &r9 

orders, called tho Tuscan, Doric, Ionic, Corinthian, and Compo&itab 

5. Arithmetic* — ^Arithmetic is the art of computing by numbers : 
and notwithstanding the great variety of its applications, it consists of 
only four separate operations. Addition, Subtraction, MultipUcatioo^ 
and Division. 

6. ^«/nmom;y.— Astronomy is that grand and sublime sciience which 
makes us acquainted^wlth the figures, distances, and revolutioub, of 
the planetary bodies ;*and with the nature and eictent of the universe, 

T|m pUoirtB of our ajttaiD m M«r«ur]p, Toimi, tbo Earth. Mar^ Jojiitor, Sauirn, Hcnefea^ 
>. ami tlw Miall phpoH litimtad bMwcn Jupiter aad Man, latoijr imohu^d, aad aaned Juno, C»ra% 
•ad VUlMk Thaw raroUt about th« Saa ; aad to Japitar, 9atura, a«d RcimImI. ibtrt aro lkir> ' 
tfMo nooaa atlaabcd, like Hat whioh attaoda (h« Earth. Baaidai thaa* that* ara OMneto; aod 
afllioM of find Kan, which artpiobaMjr iuna to other •jateaia. 

7. BMgn9»%v-*)3iography records the lives of eminent men, and 
may be called uie science oi life and manners* It teachev from ex* 
perience, and is therefore moet useful to youth. 

8. Botonj/. — ^Botan^ris that part of natural history, which treats of 
vegetables. It arranges tlfem in their proper classes^ and describet 
their structure and use. 

9. CA«mtf//^.«~Chemistry is the science which explains the coq* 
Stituent principles of bodies, the results of their various combinatioDS^ 
and the laws by which these combinations are effected. It is a very 
entertaining and useful pursuit. 

10. Ckrwiology, — Chronology teaches the method of ooxAputing 
time, and dif^tinguishing its parts, so as to determine what period ha^ 
•lapsed since any m^orable event. 

II. C/ot«bi--<)louds are nothing but collections of vapours stuf* 
pended in the air. l%ey rore from a quarter of a mile to four nuki 
Qigh. A fog ii a doud which touches ttie earth. 

VL C<w«CTefc-"CeBMnerce is the artof earJ^wging ene ooaModip 



214 JUVEinLE SPELLING.BO(»L 

tf for anoHMTy hy buying or eelMiig^, with a view to gam* Though 
pivate en^Blttmeat is Hs origin, it is &e bond of sodfety, and by it one 
country participates in the pradnctionB of^all others. 

13. Colmflgn^^^-CosiBography is a (jlescfiption of the world, or 
flie tuuTerse, including the e^rth and infinite space. « It divides itself 
into two parts, Geography tod AstFonomy. 

' 14. Ordicim^— <CriticisDi is an art wMch teadies us to write with 
propriety and taste ; but greatly abased by writers in ahonymoos re- 
ipiews, who make a trade of it, and sell their opinioos. ^ • 

15. X>et0.— Dew is produced from extremely subtile particles of 
water floating in the air, and ooodensed by ^e coolness ol Uie nigfat. 

16. MUeetricUif,, — ^Electricity is a power in nature which is made to 
dMW itself b^ friction* If a stick of sealing-wax, or a piece of glass 
^ rubbed upon the coat, or upon a piece of flannel, it will instantly 
attract pieces of paper, and other lig^t substances. The power which 
accasions this attraction is called electricity. 

lo largur •xgtrimtatt, thia powar appcan m liquid firs, and w of tbt aam* oiiIiik m UgkfiHaf . la 
A.rarticuiar kind of new expenmenU, u hM lately acquired tb« uune of Galrautia. — Sm BImir't 
^inmimr of /fatural and Exptrimmtei PhUotephy. 

17. Karitvjdakts, — An earthquake is a sudden motion of )he earth, 
•opposed to be caused by electricity ; but the difference in the mode 
Vy whidi earthquakes and lightning are effected, has not yet been 
clearly ascertained. Others asdribe it to steam genera^ted ip the 
caverns bf the earth. < ^ 

18. £/A.«».-^£thics, or Morals, tes^ch the sdence of proper ooa- 
duct acoor(£ng to the respective situations of men. 

Id. Geograp^.—^xeography is that science which makes us ac- 
qttainted trith the constituent parts of the globe, and its distribntiaa 
into lau^ and water. It sJso teaches us the limits and boundaries of 
Countries ; and their peculiarities, natural and political. It b the eye 
and the key of historv. 

, 20. Geometry, — llhis sublime science teaches the relations of mag- 
nitude, and the properties of surfacefc In an extended sense, it is the 
science of demonstration. It includes the greater part of matib^nat- 
ics, and is generally preferred to logic in teaching the' art of reasomng. 

21. Hail. — Hail is formed from rain congealed in its des6ait by £» 
coolness of the atmoe{^ere. 

'22. History. — ^History is a narration^f past&cts and events, rela« 
five to all ages and nations. It is the guide of the statesman, 'and the 
favourite study of the enlightened scholar. It is, or ought to be, the 
common sQhool of mankind, equally open and useful to princes and 
subjects. 

23, Rmnbow. — Thd rainbow is produced by the refraction and'r^- 
ftsction of the son^s beams from falling drops of rain. An artlflcial 
rainbow ittsy be produced by means of a garden engine, the water 
from whkdli must be throim in a directioQ oontntfy to that of th» so^ 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK. NO. U 215 

94. L&gie, — l^oigic is tM art of employing^ reason cfficacknttly iiT 
kiqiiiries after truth, and in oommunicating^ the result to others. 

25. .^eetomet.— -Mechanics t^idi the nature and laws of motioD> 
the action and force of moving^ bodies, and the construction and effects 
of machines and engines. 

26. Medieine,'-^The art of qiedicine consists in the knchirledge of 
the disorders to whidi the' human body is subject, and in applying 
proper remedies to remove or relieve them. • 

ftl. Jlfelto%stet.~-Metapl^y8ic8 may be considered as the scienbt 
ct the min£ From the nature of the subjects about ^hich it is em* 
ployed, it cannot lead to absolute certainty. 

2S» Mists. — ^Mists Are a collection of vapours, commonly rising frolii 
fenny places or rivers, a^d becoming^ m»re visible as the light of the 
day^iecreasef . When a mist ascends high in the air, it is call^ a cloudy 

S9. .Wiine.—- Music is tiie practice of harmony, arising from a; com- 
bination of melodious sounds in^ songs, concerts. Sec, 

30. Natural Hitto^, — ^Natural history includes a description of the 
ferms and mstincts of animala, the growth and properties of vegetsv-v 
bles and minerals, and whatever else is connected with nature. 

31. Optict. — Tlie science of Optics treats of vision, whether pev-^ 
Ibrmed by the eye, or assisted by instruments. It teaches the con- 
atniction and use of telescopes, microscopes, &c. 

SQ.^PainHng. — fainting is one of the fine arts ; and bj^ know- 
ledge of the principles of drawing and the effects of colours, it tea<.-h^ 
to represent all sorts of objects. A g^Dod irainter must possess an ori- 
ginal genius. 

33. P^muu^j/.— -Pharmacy is the science of the apothecary. R 
teaches the choice, preparation, and mixture of medicines. 

34. Philosophy, — Pfaifesophy is the study of nature, of mbd, aaA 
of morals, on the principles of reason 

35. Physics, — ^Physics treat of nature, and explain ^le pheneJfeafr 
of the material world. 

36. Poetry. — ^Poetry is a speaking pictura ; representing real or fictt- 
tioQs events by a succession of mental imagery, generally deEvered iki 

■ measured numbers. It at once refines the heart, and elevates the soul.' 

37. Rain. — ^Rain is produced from clouds, coBdeiis^|or ran to* 
gvther by Uie cold ; wldch,.by their own weij^t, fall in dn>^^of wa- 
ter. When they fall with violence, they are supposed to be Sipelledl 
by the attraction of electricity. 

38. Religion. — ^Religion is the wors^p offered to the Supreme Bo- 
ing, in the manner that we conceive to be the most agreeable to !«• 
willy in order to procure his blessing in this life, and happiness in % 
lature state. 

38. iSculp(*cr«.— Sculpture is the art of earring or] 
•Qmt baid roUrtancc^into iniges. 



6 . JUVENILE spelling-book, 

0. 5H0I0. — Snow 18 doogeBl^ water or clouds ; the |»iiicle8 of 
ch freesing, and touching^ each other, descend io beautifbl flakes. 

1 . SfiifgM^.— Surgery b that branch of the healing art which con- 
I in manual operations hj the help of proper instnimfuts, or in 
dng^ wounds by suitable applications. 

2. Thunder and fjightnang.^-Thiesn awful phenomena are occa- 
ed by the power called electricity. Lightnings consists of a stream 
he electrical fire^ or fluid, passing l^etweeU'the clouds and the 
th ; and the thunder is uothu^ more than the explosion, with its 
oes. ■ ■. • , 

loader and H^fiifaiut bMr tht mum Mhtioa to eteh oUwr m Hut iMh und ti» report of a cumm ; 
y Um qiacc 6t time which ocean between them ia both caiee, their dutaooe from a paftiouhr 
nay be kaown, reokomof ll^feetfor eraymoiiMoC. 

3. Tides, — ^The tides are the alternate flux and reflux c^ the sea, 
ch generally takes place every six hoars. The tides are occasMNied 
he united attraction exercised by the moon and sun upcovthe waters. 

4. Versification, — Versification is the arrangtrig of words and 
ables in such equal order, as to produce that harmony wlidi dis- 
uishes poetry frpm prose. Verse may be either blank or in rhyme. 
lank yerse, the last Words of the line do not correspond in sound 
bey do in rhyme. 

. B. For further particulars on idl these and many other subjects, 
tutor should put into the hands of lus pupils, Blair^s Universal 
:eptor^ or General Granimar of Arts, Sciences, and Knowledge; 
/atkins's Portable Encyclopedia; and Blair's .Grammar of Na- 
l and Experimental Philosophy. 



ABBREVIATIONS USED IN WRTTIN& AND PRINTING. « 



'. FttHpw afUft AiMTioA^t 
•my of A'rtf and Science*. 
'B.J. Baohelor ot ArU, 
,rofabi*hop. 

the year 6f cor Lotd.' 
rJtt.jt. aiaetcr of ArU. 
D the year of the werld. 
tefore ooott, 
ftewoon. ' ' " 

lebelor of Dfvtai^. ^ 
oet^r of IhviM^. 
op. 

J ironet. ' • '.* ' 
iomL 

per of the Seat 
eeperef thp P^^ "^ 
aire. ' / • 
^'eliow of the Ubuma 

Pellew of Oe- Aoti- 

wciety. 

r«U«w of the VLapd 



HON., Hooourable. 

J.U. S. Jinie the S&rtourof mA. 

/. D. Doctor of law. 

KNT. Knifht. 

LIEUT. Li«sjitFnaift 

L. S. Place of the seal. '' 

L. L. D, Doctor of the womqaoA 

aiid Civil law. 
M. t>. b(N-tor in phytftt. ' ' 
JSR. Maate^ or Miater. 
HRS. Miitreia. 
M. S. Sacred te tie rr'^mory. 
U. P. Mernher of Pariiameot. 
If. S. Maiiaieript. 
XSS. MapuKhptt. 
N. B. Mark weU. 
WO.'Namber. 
■N. A New S^lo 
O. B. Old 94rl«. 
OXOff. Oxford. 
PHlIXiM. A lorer af mathe- 

nuiticf. 
PER CENT. Bj the hwdred 



P M. G. Prtfinnor'arMdrieh 

Grreahan CoUegv. 
Pf, 5. Puatacnpi. 
RKO. PROP. iCiBf't fnhmcf 
RT. HON. Right homnuBbla. 
ST. Saiot. 

3. T. P. PrafcaMMT of Oiriaitf 
XT. Chriat. 
Xry. CbriatiaB. 
L^/.T'. Thahat. 
IB. or IBID. Tht i 
ID. The Mme. 
e. G. or r. O. at for i 
r. S. ']^bat ia. 
Q. I). Ai if he ihoold aay. 



As mach aa you pi« 
Q. 5. A aiiaSoicflt qiiaati^. 
£/.5.^.UDited^tataa < 
r. for VIDE, 8ee- 
r/Z. for rWEZiCgT, ThS 

ia to aaj. 
<S and. 



I 

• The Essentials of English Grammar. 

r ' 

fC^ For th« dctath of (rvamnw T/mml refcr th* Irantcr to th« Juxtnil* EapotAor, at to aqf 
«tlwr.inodfni g»wolpar wluok te not too lonjpafMi cwiui>Wx. K lia> heen t^ip »iilhor*i endeaToor 
ID thk I^toaUt to retain all ths <M«ahai wr indup*tuibU part* «tf Enfli$h GrumTnor, futd tort* 
jeot all suparfluoui inattcr. . , 

V.J. , 

Tbe general diviaon of lelten is into vowels and consonants. . , 

The vowebare, a,' e, t , o, u, and sometiints w and y. 

All the other letters, and sometimes tt and j^, kre called consonants. 

A diphthong is two Towels forming but one syllable : as, ou in sound. 

A triphthong is three vowels forming but one syllable : as, eau in 
beau. 

- A proper diphthong has both the vowels sounded : is oi in voice, ou 
in ounce. 

• An improper diphthong»has but one of the vowels sounded : as ea 
in eagle, oa in boat. 

•' A sylkible is soi much of a word as can be pronounced at once : as, 
a^imjant, bitter, butter /Iff. 

Words are sounds, used as signs of our thoughts. 

A Word of Okie syllahle is called a monosi/llable ; a ^ord pf two syl 
lables, a dtBtyUahle; a word of three syllables, ^UrUyllabLe; and a 
word of four or more syllables, a poltfM/Uable, 

* Words of two or more syllables, have In accent on one of the syl- 
lables. V 

Accent signifies that stress of the voice, which is laid on one sylla* 
ble, to distinguish it from the rest. Thus, in dp pie, the accent is on 
the first syllable ; and in a rise, it is on the second syllable. 'J'he mark 
placed above the sySable, and which denotes the accent, is also called 
the accent. ' 

Word& are divided into primitive and derivative. 

A pnimlive word is that which cannot be reduced to any simpler 
word in the same language ; as, ekUd, gold^ king, mean, 

A iimvaHve word is that which takes its origin Irpm another word 
called its primitive, root, or radical; as, (rom cJiild caoke^ ehUdiihi 
goldy golden ; king, kmgly ; mean, meqniy,* 

GENERAL Rt7L£S FOR' SPELLIITG.' 

RvLE 1.— ^AU monosyllables endir^ in I, with a single vowel before 
it, have double // at the close ; as, miU, tell. 

RiTLS S.— All monosyllables ending in I, with a double vowel be- 
fore it, have one I o^ly at the close ; as, mail, sail. 



218 JUVENILE SPELLING-BOOK. ' 

\ RChm Sv^-^oaonrilables tmJSBgbklfVrbiak eomponnded, ttltaSn bat ' 

m / each; as, /ti(^ MfuL 

KviM 4.— AU words of mofe tl^aa one ayllaUe, en^Biig ini, hxn 
one I only at the dose ; as/mthfuiy delightfuL Except, btfallf rte^ 
unwell, 

RuLB 6. — All derivatires from words ending ia 2^ hare ooo I oufy, 
as, eqiuUity from equal; fulnetB from/u//. Except they end ia eror 
lyi as, mUlf miliar ; fvll^fuOy* 

RoLB 6. — All participles in tng from Terbs endisg^ in e, lose the e 
fiijAl ; as, hacey having ; amtoe, amunng* Except they come from 
verbs ending in double e^ a^d then they retsun both; as, tee, tidngf 
jgnt, agreeing, 

RuL£ 7. — ^All adverbs in fyy and noons in mentj retain the e final 
of their primitives ; as kravCf hravery; r^fine^ r^finanetU. Etcept 
jiM^menisii'^aekamifledgmeni, 

Rfle 8. — ^Ail derivatives from words ending in er, retain the e be* 
ibrether; as, re/er^ reference. Except hindrance from kinder; r^ 
numbrance iriaa remember; HiostrimsSromditatter; memUrmairom 
monster, 

' RvLS 9. — All c(»npouttd words, if both end not in {, retMn thdr 
priipitive parts entire ; as, wt/^one, chang^ibkf graeelea. Exc^ 
alwaya, alsoy and deplorable. 

RvLS 10.— *A11 monosyllables ending in a consonant, with a nns^ 
vowel before it, double that consonant in derivatives ; as, em^ ^mneri 
4hm, shipping, * 

RvLB 11. — All monosyllables ending in a corssonant, withadouble 
vowel before it, double not the consonant in derivatives ; as, eUef^ 
eleepi/; troops trooper. 

Rule 12.— All wortls of more than one sylliJ)le ending in a coiao* 
nant, and acbented on the last syllable, double that oonsonantin dm* 
livatives; ^A^^eommit^oemmmee; eompdy eom pelkd , 

ETYMOLQGT. 
.The wortls of the English' language are reducible to nine kinds, call 
ea the nirie parts of speech, 

1. The words^ a, or an and the^ used before nouns U> modi% their 
tense, are called articles. 

2. Ail names of things are called nonm, 

dl All qualities :of Uungs ure called adjcctii^, 

4. All words which are used instead of wnint €i^fir aoiiitt are 
called /mmoons. > 

5. All actions are expressed by terbs, 

6.' All words which modify actions or qualities are called otfrerlit. 
7. All words which are used tojom words or s^tenoeii or 
j|»otA&6e8| are galled c^ifunHimh 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. I. 219 

8.. All words "vtiddti describe the position of penoiSs or ^ungi, a^ 
called prepositions. ^ 

9. The exclamatorj^ words, which express great eamestDesf or m-^ 
hemeace, are called tn/erjections 

ARTICLS. 

1. An cbrticU is a word set before nouns to limit their sig- 
nification ; as, a tree, an orange, t/i« ocean. 

There are two articles, a* or an, and the, 

^ is an indefinite article, and means one, with reference to more, 
and is placed before nouns of the singular number; as, a house, a 
drum, a soldier. 

win is pldbed beibre words beginning with a vowel, or k ulent ; a«, 
an 03C, on acorn, an hour. 

77u is the definite article, and always determines the thing before 
which it is put ; as, the sun, the moon, the stars. 

l^e b used beibre nouns of both numbers ; as, singular, the apple ; 
plural, the apples. 

When a noun has no article to Umit it, it is taken in a general 
sense ; as, man is l^m to die. 

irovirg. 

2. A noun is the name of any thing that exkts ; as, man^ 
tabUf Boiton: or, it is the name of any tiling which we can 
jce, hear, tatu, ameU, touch, or coneive of. 

There are two kinds of nouns, pro^r and common. 

A noun is proper when it expresses a particuiar place, country, 
oty, river, mountain, or pei-son; 9»y, Virginia, Amenca, Albam^ 
Delaware, Vjitvmm, WUliam, ice. n 

A nooD is called common, when it expresses a kind orsort;ta^ 
wum, hero, wanitntr, ice. 

To nouns and pronouns belong gender, number, person, and case. 

GKNDER. 

Gender is the distinction of sex. 

There are three genders ; the nuueuline, 'feminine, and neuter. 

All words which signify males, are of the masculine gender ; ai^ 
a man, a horse, an ox, &c. 

All words which signify females, are of the feminine gender; as^ 
A hen, a dttck, a wommi, kc. i • 

Words which sigi^fy things inanimate, are neuter, that is, neither 
male nor female ; as, hmue, ham, farm. Sec. 

Some nouns, being applied both to males and females, are of the 
common gender; 3b, friend, eotuin, neighbour, Ac " 

* J iiutead of on, » dow um<1 hefora words beginniof with u long, m • anioe. It m kIm um4 
Mot* on«, h many • tea. 

f Than- are Mvtnl oth«r dbtibetioot of noupt, m r«f ttfar, AMw<Kfar. db^neU rmffii^ttl, uM 
^mulHtmU. (8m JotmnI* £sp«ilM.> 



2^ JUVEfOLE SFELUNG^BOOK. 

TbMpe art HuAle methods of <iistiiigiii0faii!« the gander* 

1. By differe&t wordi ; as, 



Boy. 



Stnr. 
CHrL 



Uoek, 

Bull, 
Bullofll 



BullMl« I 



CMk, 



Dm. 

Cow. 

Hfliftf* 
Hm. 



Mkli. 

Di». 

DtmlM, 

Evl, . 

FktlMf, 

Hut. 



Biiah. 

Bttck. ' 

ModMT. 

Nua; 
Bo*. . 



Mmk. 



KiHT. 



Wife. 
Queca. 



t IMt. 



Mu, 
MoMar, 

Milur, > 



Ladjr. 



Spawntfk 
Nitot. 



Slovwr 



8l0t. 



Undo, 
Wizard, 



. Malt. 
Abbot, 
Aeto^, 
Arbittr, 
Ban% 
.Catsnr, 



Couat* 
Diiln, 

DWMOB, 

Elaotar, 

Empcroor, 

Heir, 

Hfitt, 
/ew, 
Lioa« 
Facr, 



F«mal« 
Ahbou. 
'AotrtM. 
ArbitnM. 
Baronatt. 
CatoioM. 
CThaaOnna. 
CouiilcM. 
Dqa b aw. 



2. By a difference of ter ination; as, 



BIJhtroM. 
EiapfaM. 
Haircn, 
Hnaiaa. 

HMtCM. 
JtWflM. 

LioecMw 
PaarMb 



Pbat, 






Ti|f.f, 

Tutor* 

Wido«r«r, ■ 

Adulterer, 

Aialwnador. 

Bridegroom, 

Benefactor, 

Coadiietor, 

BBehanter, 

Eaecutar, 

OonriM^ 

Hunter, 

MMiieil, . 



Fetmle, 
Poetfeu. 

^PriorpM. 

TifrcH. 

Tutorctt. 

Widow. 

AduUeraH. 

Ambkatadi 

BrUe. 

BeaafketrtMi* 

Coodaetreia. 

Eoebantren. 

Excautria. 

GevaBaeH, 

HuBJ^ren. 

Laadfraviiie. 

MaNhi 




Mala. 

A eoek-aparrow, 
A man-aerffaot^ 



3< By prefixing another word; tBp 

Female. • «- . 

A bcn-spamnr. 
A nwid^ervaat. 
Aaht-fvau ' 



Aha4»«ar. 
Amale^iM, 



A»he4«ar. 

A 




WMBER. 

JVi/m6ef IS the distincUon of one, from seTeral, or many* 

J^ouns and pronmms h&ye two numbers, the sin^lar an4 plural. 
The ringuiar nomlMir agnizes but one; as, a thip^ an. oar, tht 

The plwral niuaber agoifies more than one ; as, peorr, ptuntf 
mdons^ kc. ^ , 

. The plural number of noi^ns is generally fenned by adding t to the 
su^gular ; as, hat, fiats ; orange^ orangesy &q. 

When the noun siugular^ends in ar, rh^ ih^ or ««, we add a to make 
the plural ; 9s,fox,foxet{ rush, rusfiu ; min,_mUsii^ &c. 

Nouns ending in for fa are generally made plural by dianging/ 
or/£, iuto tes ; as, loaf, loaves ; wife, irivM, &c. 

Nouns which end mff, have (he regular plnral^ as, fi^, ^J!^ 
muff, pmffs, " ^ ' ' 

Noons which end in y, in the ^^ngular, preceded by a consonant 
change they into te* ; as, beauty, ketnUiat chtny, ckvriUf Ac 



^4^sesSlca» school clXss-book. no.")- 221 

^^^^JVhicheDdinjry fNraceacledbjr&Towel, fiAifheplimly by 
adding «; as, /oy, Un/t ; Amnejf, ehmniet, ice. 

Some Domis are alike in 1)oth numbers ; as, deer^ dieqfy nrintf lee 

Some nouiity from the nature of the tMings which'theyexprea^tf* 
usc^ only in the singular; as, toAeol, jn/eA, ^U^ sloth, tec. 

Some nouns ifre qsed only in the plural; as, belhwt^ mu9r% 
ittufferff nipperiy riehetf kc. ' 

^ , PsRSOir. 

There are three persdns, the^rs^, teeond, and/Airi. 

The first person relates to pronouns only ; the second and third r»> 
late both to nouns and pronouns. 

- The first person is when the speaJtoer speaks himself; as, / lore, I 
strike, /move; or of himself in connexion with others; as, wehatf 
Vft ttnke, «M move, &c. 

The second person is spoken to; as, 7%ou art good and wise. 

The third person is spoken of; as Maria improves; Virtue «■• 
alts her. 

When any particular person or thing is addressed, i^ becomes tfa« 
second person ; as, O tun! Oh fFatkingtonJ The pronoun tium b«* 
ing understood ; as, O ihou sun I Oh thou Washington ! 

Dkcceksiov. 

Dedenaionf is the Variation of nouns^nd pronouns by cases*. 

Cask. "^ 

Coue, in Grammar, expresses the yariatioD of nouns and 
pronouns, either with respect to termination or situation. 

In EngVmh there are three cases. 

The nonmtatioe case is simply the name of a person, plao% or tfain^ ; 
as, Albert, Bettonjjire, irtMbm, Sec. 

The potteuive case expresses the relation of property or po»*e- 
aion ; and has aa apostrophe, with the letter < after it; as^ JBrfipm> 
knife) MarpU ring, virtueU reward, &c. 

When the plural ends in <, the other f is omitted, but the apostro- 
phe (^ } is retained ; as. On eagUsa^ wings, the drmars* ooQipany^ 

Sometimes also, iriien the singular ^^ in u^ ttie apostrophic^ is 
not added ; as, For righieoumus* sake, fi>r goodness^ sake. • 

The ifbjeeiive case expresses the object of an actiop, or of a rsla- 
tion, and follows av active rerbi an active participle, or a preposi- 
tion ; as, John atnsU Charles. They live «n London. I prmm 
tbevt. On teeing him, &c. 
. English suhstantives are dooUned thus: 

WiU^ (ho indefinite arfide^ 



VoflBiMlivt «Mi^ A ri««r. 

y Hi* Mfet, A timf*i. 

0^««lil««M^ AliiW. ifiMI 



22Z JWWmM SPELLING-BOOK. f 

^ « With the ddlnito article. • ^ i.>^/ 

Singtdar. . PturoL 
IfoaiiMitiv* faiM. Tb* wonhui. The womctt. 

Pouenive ctaa, Ttw wuiraui^a. Tb* woawB*ll. 

« CMJmO** caM, Tba wOuiMk. Ths wmms. 

ADJBCTIVSSl. 

3/ An adjective is a word used to express the quality of a 
noun ; as, a sweet peach, a pleasiatU prospect., 

Adjectives admit of three degrees of comparison, ihApontvoe^ the 
comparative^ and the superlaHve. 

The positive «tate expresses the simple quality ; as, goodj trase, great. 

The comparative increases or diminish^ the significatioa m the 
positive ; as, «?««-, greater, less wise. 

The superlative increases or diminishes (he s^pitfication of the pos- 
itive to the highest or lowest dc§n:ee ; as, ymest, greatesty' least ivise.* 

The positive degree b madettie cdmparativc ly adding^ r or er ;and 
the superlative, by st or est,' when tile positive ends in e ; aa, wisef 
wiser, wisest. 

The adverbs more' and most, set befi>ire adjectives, have the same 
effect as er or est added to them ; as, wise, more wise, most wise. 

MonoeyUables are generally compared by er or est ; and dissyllablei 
l>y more and mpst ;t as, great, greater greate*/ ;f /rt^gni, more fruj^a], 
MM/ frugal. 

Some words are irregularty compared } as, 



#odftv< Dtg, Comf. 


AlfMT. 


Po$.JD^, 


C»Mfh ' AqMn 


Good, ' httttf. 


b«t 


Near, 


Mftnr, Beanat or mat. 


Bad, «onc, 


itoitt* 


Old, 


older or aUcr. oldett er eMaM. 


Liuj.. k«. 


loMt, 


LaU, 


later, klaat or krt. 


MoohrornMqjJdMn, 


WNC. 


' r 


; 



PROirOFHS. 

4. A pronoun is a wprd used instead of a noun, to avoid 
repeating the same word ; aa, Maria improves because the 
{Maria) is diligent. / 

There are three lands of pronouns*; the pertotutly the rekUvtef and 
the ctdjective. 
The personal pronouns are so called because tfaey relate to peraooi. 
There are five personal pronouns, vix. /, Ifteu, he^ she^ it ; with 
tfieir plurals tee, ye or you, they. 

Eronouns have three persons in each nidnber, v\z, 
/, ' is the first person,^ 

Thotif is the secdhd person, > Singular. 

Ha, sfie, or it, Es the third person, j • 



* To the .i.o^rUtiw (io|prM, the indofluto aiticU ahouU b» dtaagod iaio l3km < 
t To tbb rok Umk ara ajMepcioM. 
^ j MoaoeyM aMaa, wU« tMafuuk ty ar o# 4tfc W— > itavDa^lw i» Iht «aapMmim aaf ifth 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. I. 223 

'* 

^ Wtf iSihe'&rstt person,'^ 

Ye or ytnif is the second person, > Plural. 
Thqfy is the third person, ) 

^jinoiial propouDs have two niuabcn, the singulai*, a^d plurali 
as^^hg^ar, /, thou, ht^ she^ it; plural, u;e, yeovyouy they. 

PefiBooal pronouns hare gender, number, perdon, and case. 

Gender has resp^ only to the third {)erson singular of the pro- 
nouns; as, Ae, s^, •/. 

Pronouns have three cases; the ^toimn^se, the poMe^nVe and the 
objee^ixe. 

The objective case of proniouDS has, in general^ a £ynii di&reiit 
from that of the nonunative, or the possessirre case. 

The personal pronouns are thus declijied. 

P^jon. Case. Singular, PluruU 

rNomu I We. 

l^irsL... < Poss. Mine Ours* 

^Obj. Me Us. 

C Nom. Thou . /Fe er juMm 

Second <Poss. Thiae Tours. 

fObj, The« You. 

( Nom. He They 

. Third <Pos8, His Theirs 

' f Obj. . » Him . Them. 

CNom. She They. 

iTMrd < Poss. Hera Theiw. 

fObj. ' Her Them. 

♦ CNom. It They. 

Third...";.... 7 Poss. Its Thofs. 

fObj. It Tkiem* 

fi£LATiys PBOSotrirs. 

The rtltxHve pronoum are wfto, which, and that. They 
are called relanve pronouns, because they relate to some 
word or phrase going before, which is thence called ^e an<^ 
tecedent ; as. The man is happy T»ho lives virtuously. 

JVho relates to persons ; which to ammab ot* inanimate things i^-^ 
t}tat may refer either to persons dt tiungs ; as, Thcf b&y who is idl« 
does not improve. The bird wkith sung so sweetly has flown. 

Whafk a kind of a compound relative, including both the reUitive 
and the antece4c;nt ; and is the same as (bat iMeh; as. This is whai 
I saw, that is, the thing whieh I saw. 

Who is the same in both numbers,, and is thus declined. 

' . * Th* wajwaod fraaanmtt ^iimnlf, Karnlf, ^Hll« 9WMi9u j^vmntlvn, tAtHwtffW^ ^' 



224 JUVSMLE SPEUJXG-BOOK. 

« 

Singular and PiurtiL 
Nominative caae^- Who. 

■ Possessive case^ Whose. 

Objective case, Whom. , 

Who, which and i^hai^ when used m'askisj>^ questions, are calleii ia- 
terrogatives ; as, fFho was he? Which is &e mda? ^Aa< are jroa 
doing;? / • ' ' 

ADJKCTIVB moWOVlfS. 

AdQWtiv% pronouns are of a mixed nature, having: the prop- 
erties both of pronouns and adjectives, and are subdivided 
into four sorts, s\z» The possessive, the distributive, the de^ 
monstrcUive, and the indefinite. 

The posseMive a^ectivt pronouns are, m^, thy, his, her, our, your^ 
ffieir. 

They are caUed possessive, because they signify property or pos- 
eedsioii. 

The distributive adjectite pronouns zre, eaehy every, either- 

They are called distributive, becs^use they denote tiie persons or 
things thatmakfl up a number, taken separately, and singly ; a?, Emch 
of them is ri€l»^ ivesfy one is not happy ; I have not seen either of them: 

The demon^lrative adjeetice pronoims, this, that, .and their plurals 
these and those, point out the subjects t^ which they relate ; as, Thi$ 
boy is B^ious; /^/ man is industrious. 

Jl^is refers to the necyrest pemm or tlung, that refers to the mor» 
distant ; as, this man knows more than tfiat* 

7%is mea|is the latter, or last mentioned ; that, the former, or fint 
mentioned ; as, Wealth and poverty are. both temptatiionfi ; this teoflt 
to excite pride, tfiat, discontent. 

The indefinite adjeeiioe pronouns ViTe, some^ ona^ any, ail, oUur^ 
tfjbch, kc. 

They are called ind^fisidte, because they ezpreas thdir subjecti is 
a general and unlimited manner. 

One and other aft Ihos . ddcliatd.' 

Sing, Pht.^ 

ifiTomiuatiti^i oase|. One. ones.' 

Possessive case. One's. ones'. 

Objective case, • One. , onet. 

Ov9n is added to possessive pronouns, both in the singular and |iii<i 
ral numb^; as, singular. My own, his oujn; plural, our ^wn, 
yauroun. 

VERBS. ' 

5. A verb is a word that signifies beiog, doing, or saflbi'* 
ine, or the receivingr of an action. . 
^here are thiree kizuos of verbs, the actioe^ passive, and niUtptm * 
/erbs are divided ijtto rcgvUor, trregvjbar, and <H^ltvf. 



AMERICAN »CH001. CLASS-BOOK, NO. I. 225 

Aa active verb ezpressies an action, and implies an agent, and an 
•Iject actedf upon ; ^, James ^es WiUiasn ; I esteem good boys. 
, Apattive v€r6 expresses a passion or suffering, or the receiving of an 
aciipn, and implies an agents and. an object acted upon \ as, William 
«l iioed by James ; good boys are esteemed by me. ' 

A neuitr vtrh expresses neitheY action nor passion, -but simplyAlie 
being, state, or condition of things; as, lorn; bets; we«2eep; tbiqrstl. 
■ ActiTe verbs are either transiiive or intrtmsiiioe. . ^ 

Active verbs are c^.lled transitive, when the action- of the ageat 
passes tot^e ol:(J9Ct; as, Casar eonqttered Pompey; Leoi^daa gotm 
tfiTietf Sparta. ^' . 

Actiot verbs are called tntrmmtivt^ when the action of the agent 
does i^t pass to an object, bUtisconmiedtothedgeatitsc^; as, John 
ttfoZfcfV Edwin rum. , . 

Auxiliary verb^ are used to asoftt m the conjngatioa of other Ttrbff. 
^heyare, ifo, 6e, Aove, shaU^ tnllj masff and can, with their varia* 
^tiCQs; and ^/* and musf, whtcfa have no variation. 
. A regiUarverb is tliat whidi forms its imperfect tense and perfect 
participle by the addition of ed^ or dy whan the Verb euda in < ; as. 
Presents la^erfeet. Perf*pari, 

Correct, corrected, , coirrected. 

Rejoice, "^ rejoiced, rejeieed* 

An irregular tferb is that which doe9^ not form its imperfecf' temit 
and peifect participle by adding doted; 9M^ 

Present, Imperfect* Per/, partt '''^•^ 

Arise, ai^e, aristo. 

Forsake, forsool^ forsaken. 

A defective verb is that which is used only in som^ of its moodi aqi 
wBuses ; as. 

Present. Imperfect, Perf. or pat, part. 

Can, .could. - - -''^- 

May, might '---•• 

To verbs belong numberfy persm, nwtdj and tense. 

irVMBSB Aim PSIIS^. 

Verbs have two numbers, the singular am the plural ;. a% 
. Singuiar. J command. . He writes. 

Plural. We Command. TheywrlU« 

In each numbefl^here are three persons ; as, r- 

Sihgitlar. . PhiraL 

First person* I walk. We walk* 

Second person. Thou walkest. fou walk. 

Third person. He walks. Tbeywalk. 

* Ltt, M ao R|ixilJii7, bu 00 Ttrtation; b«t whm oNdM • priadpl vnb, it famM: ji^ |g^ 
trttnt,UUetlL 
i Sm fttem osdtr ^ defnitio* of a 



^ 226 JUVENILE SPELUNG-BOOff. 

MOOD. 

Mood signifies the various ways in which the sigDificaiioD 
of a Terb may be expressed. 

Verbs h&ve five moods : vis. the indieaitBey imperniitef poienUaif 
subjunetiive^ apd ii\/initive. 

The mdUaHve mood, either declares, affirms, denies positively, or 
asks a question ;* as, I hear f hedpetnot'read; doethbUoeh? 

Tlie imperatiiot mood commands, exhorts, iatreats, or permits; aa^^ 
Depart thou ; let us stay ; go in peace; 

'Vhe potential^ mood im^^^ possibility, will or obligatioQ^' and it 
known by the auxiliaries yna^, eon, mtfv^ might, could, vtould^ thoyddj 
kcl as, it may ram; we vniglUgo; beeanwrile; they shoidd learn. 

The fubjtmctwe mood is useid to express doubt^ or uncertainty, con- 
dition, motive, wish, or supposition, and follows a conjunction express- 
ed or understood; as, were We good, we should be happy; Aouglk 
he slmf me, yet will I trust in him. 

The. inJiniti'Def mood expresses a tiling in a general sense* It h^ 
neither number nor person, and is known by the sign to ; as, to write; 
to reed; to command, 

A pitrtieipU is so named, because it partakes of the nature of a verb 
and an adjective. 

There are three participles : viz. the present or attwoy the perfeet or 

ptusice, 9Ad the compound perfeet; as, present participle, caOmgf 

Perfect partkipiey called s coapooadperfectparticipleiyWiiwig'eaUL 

f T£VSB,. 

Tetise is the distinctton of- time. 

The natural divisions pi time are the |irefen(, past, 9odfigtwe; 
but to mark it more accurately, it is made to consist of six variatioiB : 
viz. the present, the imperfect, the perfect^ the phipttftct, ttkejkii 
9n(iseeo7id future. 

The present teme represents ^ action or event as now passing; •% 
I speak; I am peaking. 

The imperfect tense represents an action or event ta indefinitely 
past or finished ; as, I urp/e ; I was writing. « 

The perfect tensc not oiJly . represents an action or event as plut and 
fipished, but also has reference to the present time ; as, I haoejinish-' 
M my letter. 

The pluperfect tense not only represents an action or event as past 
and finished, but also as prior to some other action or event whidi it 
- also past ; air, I had seen John before^e stage arrived. 

Xhe ^rst future tense represenl&an action or event as yet tpoonu^ 

■ - -■■-■-■ ^ - - 



* The (MttDtkl mcwd, MkM thk lodmtiva. to irfUn uMd fa Mkm^ (fOMUaw ; at, tmi im nU V 

Wttld tu go? 4 

f The ifi£iutive to tb> nitieid form of tb« verb, from which ftU tV«th«« Uc dnirat : Mk AVA 
*■ nrb to 4wtU. «MMb I dw«U, h* diralk, m d«tU^ ks. 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. h 227 

cither with or without revpect ti> any particfular time ; afi, I shall ttt 
them agrain; ^ the sun wUl rise t^^worrow. 

The seeondjtUure tense represents an action or er^ a$ yet to come^ 
so as to foe accomplished or finished M or beibre the occurence of $tvne 
other future action or event ; as, I shaU ftaofi wriilen before the post 
arrives; vre shall have dined 9t Hoelw o'^eUtek. * 

The coDjx^tion of a vetfo is the reg^ular arrangement and combi 
nation of its several numbers, persons, moods, and tenses^ 

There are two voices, the active and passive. 

The conjugation of an active verb is called the aetvH voiees and 
ttiat of a passive verb, the passioe voice. 

cojrjvoATiojir av vieitBi. 
Thhave. 





nmiCATIVE HOOD. ^ 


1 
• 


Present Tense. 


nkf. 


Plvt. ' 


% jMn. } h*««. 


1. W« have. 


S. |Nn«. Tlio« bak. 


a Ytorjoahnw^ ^ y 


3. jwffs.H«)MthttrfeM. 


& Tki^fam. 




btfferfeet Tense, 


Ibff. 


PInr. 


1, lUA, 


1. Wc had. 


9. ThDubaift, 


9. Y« or yon htdi 


a.,fi«^d. 


a Tbijrbad. 


/ 


Pei/ee/ 7V»we. 


Stag, 


War. 


h ri»v»ittd. 


1. Weh«Mhad, 


3. Tboa bMt had, . 


2. r« or JOB havajMil^ 


a H« luth, M* kM buL 


3. Theyhavahiid. • 




Plupeifeet Tense, 


SfafT* 


Wur. 


L f htd bMl, 


1. We bad had. 


9. Tbou hadatlttd, 


3. Y«oryo<ibadba4 • 


9. Ii« had hftd. 


3. Thay had had. 


1 


First Fuime Tens^, 


hhg. 


Plur. 


1. liluU«rwiUfaAW, 


1. W« iball »r win hive. 


3. Tbou »Mt or wih h«««. 


a Y« or jou thall ar Will l»v«. 


9, B« tbAll 9r. will have 


a Tb^ Bfaall ar wiU hava. 



iSecoiuf FtOure Tensei 



1. 1 ahall or win hare had, 

3. Tbou ahalt or wilt bava had, 

a BetUl*rwttlhaT«taui. 



Plar. 
1. Wa ahall or will bava bid, 
a y a or yoa shall or wiD !»▼• te J^ 
a Tbay ■ball or will Lava bad. ' 



UIPSRATIVS HtOOB. 



ttng. 
t, Ltt ma bava, 
% Hart tbo«i, or do %))} blJin^ 
aJUtMU'kM* • 



Uf 



Plur. 
1. Latinhavi, 
a Save ja or yon, drip 7*1 
^ XtCtttMB llBVl* 



228 wvJsmLE. spellikg-booe* 

Present Tenst. » 

1. I amf wr «ta f^w, L W« my •r cm Immv^ 

f. T Wo oMjrM or eanilli«v%, 3. Tc or yoaai^orau 

9. Ht BMjr «r Mil bar*. S< Tbej nkjW am iHcWk 

hnpeifeet Terue, 

MBf. - Plur. \ 

L I nirht, eetdd, ivooU, or d>o«|41»««, 1. Wa night, ««bU1. weddL M* d|aaU feM^ 

SL TlmiiBiglttit,(»uUat,iViMld«Uor«lkoii)dttlMTe,9. Tt or you iii%btf eoaU, woal4i a** ■kooU i«ii% 
9. li* mifht, wuld, would, or tboald tev*. 3. Tbey «uf ht, ouiu, irsaU, en 

Perfect Tense. . 

1 I mjF or du te«« bad, 1. We naaj or ma btvo had, 

S> Tfaov nnyit «r caMt ban l»dl, 3. Ye or yoo may •r oao bar* bad^ 

9^ H« nay or eaa faara bad. 3. Tbej nay dr oaa bava bid. 

t ^ Phiperfeci Tense, 

SiBf. Pter. 

1. I nifbt, eovld, woald, or ahoiiMl bav* bad, 1. Wt mifbt, eeaU, wgold, ar Andd I 

SL Tboa tnlKbUt, oaaUat, woohbt, or ibottldat 2. Yc'or yo« njibt, easld, waold, »r riMnId 

harabad, haro Wd, 

S. Baaafta«oo«M,WB«ld,arriio«ldbava'bad. 8. Thaymigbt,aoaId,WMdd,«rdMiUlM«byL 

IITBJIT^CTIVE UOOD* 

Present Tense, 

Sine; ^^'* 

1. irihava, 1- Ifweba«a, 

9. Tftboubavi^ 9. If ye or you ba»% 

S. Ifbabpva. 3. If tbay hava.* \ 

IWIiriTlTB MQOB. 
FrmuU Ttmtt To bai«. Pttj/M Tcmo, Ta bava ha4. 

FAATICrPLBS. 
Pr«i«Mf, • Hafiaj. 

Cwiptmd ftrfMtt Bavnc bad. 

The neuter verb to he^ often used as an anxUiafy, is coiyiigated mb 
Qie IbUofwing maimer. 

^ To be, 

/ Present Tense, 

1. I an, 1. Wo aM, 

9LTboaaf^' 2. T« or yo« ara^ . 

3. Ha ik 3. Tbey ai*.. 

Imperfeet Tenu, 

mug. I'hir. 

1. I wa% I. Wo were, 

9i Thou wai^ > ' - 9iireoryoii' 
3. W9 waa. & Tbey w^n. 



* Tbe rem ai ai^ teawa of tbe tabjaaottra nood, an jm^fKfitni, •inSHur to Uw ntirriapnaiWal 
ana* «f the iodtoatiTe mood ^ irtib me adtitioo to the verb, of e eoajuaetiaa,-oxptMead or implM. 
deaetinc « eoodiUoa, SMtivat «*Wi ntpfiokKwtf, ko. li witl ho proper to diraet Ike baiMf tol^ 
liaivll tl» lifM of (Ui 4M*d, wiU » aaiguetfao fntftta la ca«k ar thaa. 



AJil£lUCAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. L 229 

Pcffert Tense, 

8ta|r* Plar. 

I. I inv* bMO, ]. We hftvabMB, 

1. Thou hut boan, 3. 7« or y«u have bifi. 

a HclMth«rbMbNik S. Tl«]r tev* b««B 

Piiwerfeei Term, ^ 

«i«, Plor. 

1. I hkd bMB, i; W« iHl4 btm, 

9. ThoQ IndM hct^ 3. Y« «r yon Nui bMB, 

aLHtWNm. S. Thej iMd likra. 

J^4l Future Tente. 

1. I thall »r wHI b«, . 1. W« riMlI dr wffl bt» 

SL Thou bImH or wUt bi^ , SL JT* or yoa ahall cr ivffl bt^' 

» HoatettorwiUbe. 9. 'Th»j dnn or wiB bo. 

Seetmd Future Tente. 

»m9 Phir. 

I. 1 dMOiorwiflbiTvbcM* 1. Wc abaU orwiQ bavi^ boM, 

9. Thoa •bmh or wilt bairo boon, 3. fe or yoa abtU or wtU bavo !••«« 

X Htibdl or will ter* *«•■. 3. Tboytboll or will bar* bM*. 

IMPERATIVE MOODI 

1. L*tueb9, 1. Lotoabo, 

9L Vfi tboa or JTM, 3. Be jc or fou, 

9: Lot bin l»^ 3. Lot tbcni bt. 

POTEirTlAL MOOD. 

Preitni Teme, 

1. r nay «r can bo, ]> Wo may or oao bo* 

% Tbou toKpx. or eanat bo, • 3. To or yoo nay or oaa bt,. 

9. Ho n».i or caa bo. 3. Tbqr aiay or eaa bo 

JmpeifoU Tense* 

Kn§t Flur. 

t. I mifhl, coqM, wwM, or dmUbo, ]. Wo nJKhC, ooald, woald, or fhooM bo, 

£ Tboa miKhtat, eoaUal, wootdat, or Aooldbt bo. S. To or yoo mifbt, oootd, woaki, or iImniM b«i 
4 Bo aaiKbt, cwuU, wout<l, «r abouU bo. 3. Tb^ wi^^ oould, woold, or aboaU bo. 

Perfect Tense, 

Siaf. • Plor. 

I. I aav or omi havo Wm% I. Wo ma/ or eaa'ktvo boon, 

9L Thou Boyot or oaatt bava b«a, 3. To or yoo oMy or tiaa haw bo«% 

IL tf o iMj or oaa bavo boom 3. Th^ nay or oaa bava baaa. 

Pluperfeet Tense. "• 

Saf. Ptar. 

f. I mifM, co<4d. wouM, or •heald baro boon, 1. Wo migfat, eoold, wmU, or ibavld ha** booa, 

9L Tbou ^mirbtat, oooldat, woMat, or abeuMot 3. To or yoo oi«hC/ooaM, WooU, or •boold 

bave'bocat k«ro boon, 

% B* anifbt, oeald, woold, or aboold baro baoa. 3. They ntffat, ooald, wonU, or ihooW htkf 

gVBJVJrCTITS MOOD. 

Present Tense. 

tin bo, 1. If wo bo, 

t^iriboab^ ' 9. IfyooryooV«r 

HVhab^ 1 MtbM»* 



230 jinnsmLE sp£lling*bckhc. 

Imperfect Thtue, 

Wlag, Viur. 

J. IftwcNk 1. IfiKiwm, 

t. I/lMWWI. S. irtbqrwM*. 

nrvurxTivx mooik 

JPrtfial r«Mi^ T« ta. Prrfj^U'to htm 

PA&TICIFLX8. 

▲CTXVK V0IC3B. 

The ftCtiYd verb, tototey is thus conjugated: 

Th Low, 

DTDICATIVS MOOD. 

Pratsnt Tense, 

Thapnmd fawn rf tfc* Aulfcrtt** itw>< fa A« iwt rfall A/ettir itwwi n«|TCHBll«t% 
■I ths poteniiil moodt Afcrmtd by prafziBf (b« aasfliaqr ^loy, tan, «r imvtt to lilt ptmmH Imm tf 
Ik* ndieatiT* OMod ; Qwi, f may, 0011, or mnat lora. 

a. IJart, 1. W« lova, 

& Tboa loTMt« S. Y* ar 70a lort, 

3. B*)av«tb«rWf«k 3. TtkqrJovi. 

hnperfeei Teme. 

Thi fci y ijM^fawwBfin wfukr vrU fa tltfe latortf— ino«4 ai fixoMd by a^Jiaf < cTf^ar 
tftf to lh« pTMOt; «a,lov«, 1ot«4, or <W1ov«. 

TIm imptrftet |«m« of the potentUd moM, it fonntd by pnfixitr tbt UBHiay wir*fct—K 
VMiii, or tttwl^t to the pratsnt tMM of tbt inditttivt ; tlnm, I m«rU| MmM, mmUt «r tftavU lank- 

Siaff. Pl«r. 

1. MM«d, 1. We tovtd, •- I 

9^ TUMlovtAti 2. Vcorytnlovwd, 

8. H* lovtd. 3. Tbt/ loved. 

Peifeet Tertse. 

Vh» ftrftet (cfut, of &• AMiieaf Jvt mtcd, it fbciotdlij pre&doff 1i» aodliMy tav* to ttt pwtfm' 
,;«r pMtpwtiefyl*; tlkut, I Aot* loved. 

Tilt |M^«el ftrMt, of Um petmtial moMl, b fttrowd bj ^nfisiaf th* mbUkHh Mqf haMt M» 
4>V0, «••■( iUv«i to th* pHftet putidplt; dmt, t may, em, «rmiul Aam lovad. 

Sfay. Plw. 

,1. Ihawlovadt 1 WchAT«1o««d, 

9. TiMahattlowd, 2. Y« or j«a htTt lorad, 
S IbtethM httlvTCd. S. tbejr ham lovti. 

Phperfeei Ttnse, 

Thtptmfti^tmmt of tbt iaaioaUn wooj, itfewMd by prafaiBf ftt aoiSBMy >«< to fc ftitia 
purtioipl*; tllitt, I hmi lovod. 

Tbt jA^Mtftot Itntt, of tbt poteatttl mood, it fomod by pfcftdaf &i > w i l i>i fa t , mifftf Aotii 
««iiUA«M,«Mi!dMM,orthMM Mvt, to tbt ptHbtt pwtkapit { tbw, X twd*!, ttiiU; aoiiUb m 
altftaUikOTtlovtd. - 

Siof, Fbir. 

1. I had loTtd. 1. W« bad k^radr 

9. Thou badtt leva!, 9. Yc oryoa ha^ loaai^ 

A HahadloTad. 3. Thar bad lofad. 

. Pini Future 7)mse. - 

'l%t,,^i«,/Wufiif«)i»tjiteBtdlvpraistartbaauxiliai7 1 

IdUaorvajov*. . c- » I 

1. X AaU ar wiU tora, 1. We tfaaU •*• wffl bw. 

» pea thaltor wilt laa^ & Y«or7«a tbaUarwOllM^ 

• ■•^MvwimMii. f '9.Tk«iMln-w«li»?ft 



/• 



AMERICABT SCHOOL CLAfiS-BOOK, NO. I. 231 

Second Future Ten$€. 

Tb« 9tt9nd f%th*r$ itm* h fornwd by pMMaf tlM uixiUuiu tUB Jtevt, Mr witt ktm, to % 
farSMt pwtMipta -, Uw^ I Amllt at imiU Aaw lovwL 

Siai:.' Plor. 

1. I ilwU or wil htT* krrad, t.-W* ahyi cr wiB kfcr* Ivwd, 

2. TtMW thuta »r wilt faftv* loT«.d» 2. T« •rjou liiftU t willk»« 1pi«d| 
9. U« tMl or vill bwra Un%4, 3. Tfttj •hall vrwiD tew Wv«4 

^ IMPK&A^IVB MOOD. 

Biof. . Plw. 

I. L«t nt tovc, 1. LaC m bf«( ^, 

S« Lm bunkw*. S. X«t th*n !•«•. 

FOTXJfTIAX. MOO]^ 

Preteni TVHte. « 

Biaf. Plur. 

1. Iiiifej«rflwI«Tc, I. W« mgr«f'MBlei«. 

S. Tboa iBftyit or eaoM IvM, • 9. ir«oryoaBMjeraa&k%i|^ 

8. He t»j or «u l*v«. S.. ThftjMmy or etalvt*. 

Biair. Plor 

I. Iniirht.«odd,wMU.«r4ia«Ulo^ ]. W« night, •oiM,w«iiU,«r riwMloMw 

9. Tbo« nicfatot, «o«Mit,««rf<ltt. «r ihotfldit lof«,3. St vr yon in«ht.Mald, wwU, cr ■hevll loM^ 
3 BcBf^eoaiki, would, prilMiildk^. S. Tbty iiii|fat,flMld, ireiild, tr thovU few 

P«/cc/ TWwe. 

1. I may or eu hvf* l0T«l. ]. W« any «r eaa tevc levad, 

9L Thou a»]cat*reu«c haw lOTid^ 2. 7* aryoumLy ar can hava teftJ, 

Si ii*iM9M'«HhaTaloTa4. S, Thay ■>■# or caa taava lovad \ 

Pluptrfeei Tefue, 

Siaf. Plar. x 

1. I mgliC, eeald, would, or — Id hava lerad, > 1. We aiglit, eoald. wMid, or AeddhiM lava^ 
S. Ttuw Brifbtat, eoaldat, ^bwidat, or abealdM 3. To or you aa«gbt, oaukl, would, or ikaald , 

. have kMod. have loved, 

9 Ha •Hfbt.wNiM, would, or Aoold have looad. S. l^iiH|tf,«eaU,woaild,orAMMlMr»l9ni, 

.V . BVBJVNCTIVK M009. ■' 

Present Thue, 

War. P>»'- 

1. Iflhwa, 1. I£wai0f«. 

S. irthouloTO, 3. Ifyeoryoakf«^ 

a. II ki love. 3. ir they lore. 

Ufpurrnvs jMfooi>. 

Frwmt Taw^ To bva. Ptrftt^ To have lerad. . 

PARTICIFLJBS^ 

#N mMf , EiOTniy, v rtitfwt^ l^ovedli 

Cw wy owid P*rf90tt Haeiaf knred. 

PA88IVK TOICB. 

The^OMfpe ootec, or pomvc «er6^ is formed b^r aiMMoring a p«rfiM| 
participle to the aittUiary to be, throu^ all its yariatioDs,' Uiiis i 

7b be Loved, 

IWDICATIVS siooo.. 

Pretent Tense, 

Biar. P»w. 

I. I eai loved, !• We are loved. 

S. Thou art lovadt 3. Y* or yoa «re 

t.8oiilBvod. Bi. TlWf trelovod. 



232 wvenilb; spelling-book. 

h^erfeci Tentt, 

Plur. 

1. I «u lovtdk ]. W* W0rt fof^ 

9. Tkou wut html, 3. Y« ^r fim ww* Im«4, 

S. B« wn loftd, 3. Th^ wn bwsd. 

8ii^ Plar. 

9. Tbw bast btcs lorwi, 9. T« or job ham bMp lotal^ 

a^ HchatharbMbMBlBV^ 3. Thcf bar* bwa lM«d. ^ 

Pluperfect Jhuc* 

1. I bad Imu loT«< i. WabMibNBfarH . 

Sl Tbmt luuitt bMD loTtd, 3. T* cr >«u bad baas I«fi4 

ai Ba hMl baaa iMwL a Tb^ had baaa lofwL 

FM Future Tenu. 

8!n|r. Pl«r. 

1. TtbaUarwtHbalovtd, 1. WaabaU or wfllba laved, 

9L Thou thah or w^t ba lovad, & ITa «t> you afaall ar will ba lova^ 

A Ha thatt ar wUl ba lovad. 3. Thqr abaU arwiU W lafadL 

Seevnd Future Tense, 

|. I ibull arwfl) bafa baaa lovad, 1. Wa tball t will biM baaa low!, 

9. Thou abalt or t^It bavl baeti lovad, . % Ta &rfon diaH or wiDbava baan laM^ 

A Ha ihaU 9r wiU hava baaa lovad. . S. Th^ abaU ol- will tava Um lH<a4: 

IMPB&ATlVx HOOP. 

1. I/ctnabalMVd, L Let aabalovad. 

t. BafhoaloTad. ordeAdabakrrtd, 9L Ba ya lovad, or do ym W lovti, 

i.JUfcUBih»1o«wL • & UtthambalBivpd* 

rOTEimAX« JtfOODii 

present TWice. 

•taf. Plur. 

M T may or eaa bajovad, 1. Wa nnajr or aia ba favalt 

3l Thou majat or oaoat ba levvd, 9. Ta or you av/ or eaa baIovi|da 

i. Uamair oreaAbalovad. 3. Thoymay orcaa balovad. 

Impeffeitt Tense. 

Siiy. Plar, 

1. I m^bt. «oald, wonid, or diaaU b« lovtd, 1. Wc mirlit« aovld* wmM, or dMvld ba loMi. 

9. Thou miKbm, oooldat, wouUat, or rfuMiUal 3. Ta or you arigbi, ooald, wwU, or iboald bo 

be luvfd, loTod. 

|l Bamigbt^cMb^«oiildi«rihoiiUbal»rad. & Tboy |a«ht,a0ald,frimM«orahoaldbalBvai. 

Perfect 3>w«. 

BiBf. . Phr. 

1. T loay or aaa hava boon lo^d, 1. Wa may or «aa hava baan lottd, 

9> ThOH nayftt or casrt bavc bMD Ia«»d« 9. Te or yiw laay or afa bara baaa Ltaa^ ' 

3. Ha aiay Or Oku hava baaa lorad. X Tbtf may or daahava baan ievad. 

Pluperfect Tmse. 

Sinp. Plur. 

1. I rni<bt, aoaU^ woald, or ihouU bata baao 1. We mji^ eoddi wdOld, dr akaold Havaaav 

)<>V<d, loved, 

S TLu mig^btst. ooulditf wouldn, or ibooldit d. Yo or yoo taigbt, eoold, woiddi tr AoaM 

ovr txtan l«Vi^, bare IjMb lovad, 

X Be laicbt^eeul^ waaUI,arlboaldhavaboaa 3< Tboy nirht, omiM, weald, wd»^ Imm 

lovad, ^ btaakfad. 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-BOOK, NO. L 233 

Present Tense, 

Plur. 

S. If Aea bt lovad^ 3. njtoryombtlafti^ 

9. Ifh«telm4. S.. IT tlwjr b* lov^. 

bnperfecl Tense. ^ 

9inf . • Plar. 

]. If I «Mw l0Md, xl. Xfwttwirtlefedp 

SL If thM w«rt l«<i«d, 3. I(y9^fvaww\m%i^ 

3. irb«iMnloT*d. 3. IfthrytreraloMd. 

INFIiriTIVB MOOD. 
Pg«««irt T«nM, To te ktfei. Ptrftei, Tohftv* teen lond. 

FARTICirUBS. 

Pretmf, Bciay Io*«d, 'Perf§ett Bum loT«d« 

Cont]p«iiml i>irf/M<( Hkrisf been lorad. 

Verbs active are conjugated, by adding^ the present partloiple to fhft 
Terb to be^ to express the continuation of an action. 

Pnttnt. J Jmpmfiet, 

1. I «a» nftdiop, }. I w«» rwdiof , 

2. TbonaitwritSiif* 22. Tbou trut writu^* 

3. H« Mworkwf. 3» He wm worldnf. 

Neuter verbs are conjugated trith tl^e present participle, to sigDyif 
being or position. 

Prawnt. * tiffmifitU. 

X. I Ma tiMptDf. ^ "W* Were dnpjttf^ 

2. Tl^u vt titttaf, S Ye«w«rc'iittwf, 

9b Be ii apeeJoaK. S. T^jr were ■peaUqf. 

The conjugation may be continued through all the moods and 
tenses, by prefixing the different tedses of the verb to ^ to the ptreoeot 
pafticipl^. 

1. Iweenttinf, L Ifewentrfttiagf 

9. Thoa iwat been nttfsf, 2. Ye er yoa were litliBf 

S. HebubdeniittiAc* 9.«Tbqn|ere attaf. 

ADVERBS. 

6. An cLdvtrh is ^ word joined to a verb, participle, adjective^ 
or another adverb, to express the time, place, circumstance^' 
des^ree, or manner thereof; as, we must rise ear/y ; he ha9 
behaved r»tll; John will be hen iow^; she is « truly good 
woman. 

Some adverbs admit of compariioa; as, moi^ «ooner, soonaii ^ 
ieuy ofine^, ofinestf Sec, 

Adverbs eudix^ in Iff, are compared by mOre and fMstf as, ime^ 
more wiseli^ mosi wisely ; sweetljff more sweetfy^. ^"^^ sweelfyy ScQ* ' 

GOHJiTircTidirs. 

7. A ecii^unction serves to join words or sentences together^ 
and shows the manner of their dependence upon each oth^; 

« as, You and I are happy, because we are good. 

GonjuAfitioat art principally divided into oopuMve .anddi^jiaBliifSi^ 

4 



234 



JUVENILE SPELLING-BOOK. 



CopnlatiTe conjimctions express an addidon or increaoey and 
tiuue the same sense ; as, Cattiande omf Mary love their parents. 

DiarjunctiT^ conjunctioBS express opposiUon of meaning} as, our 
JiappinesB w miser j depends' on ourselves. I 

PftlSPOSITIOVS. 

8. A prepontt<m shows the relation between nouns and 
DionouDS with respect- to other words ; as, he went Jrom 
t^-Yofk to Boston. 

9. An inttfjectwn is a jvord- expressing a sudden emotioD 
of the mind; as, aloAi strange! axoayi hail! hu$k! -vdr 
come ! &c. 

IRRSGVLAR VERBS. 

Most of the irregular and defective verbs are t^ t^ found in Hm 
loUowing^ tables; in which the |9res6n/^ the tmptrfect^ and the ptrfeei 
participle are properly distinguished ; and which the learner shbuld be 
able readily to conjugate, through all the moods and tenses. 

Such of the following veM>s as admit of the regular form, are mark« 
ad with the letter r. 

The first class of irregular verbs, have the prasent and imperfeci 
lenses, aitid the perfect participle alike ; as, 

Cof/ present tense, cast imperfeet tense^ cmi perfect particijdei kc^ 



W«tr 



shnd 



I Mi I Imtor I kH * I tpit ' I COM I cot ( abut ) 
•hfMl |bid {■Utr|«i>4ik {ixit |hartN| tbrat | 

Some verbs have the imperfect tense, and the partidple ahke, but 
vary from the present ; as, 

Imp. It pw£ fkit. 



AM* 
awak* 



a w«Br 

WMl* 

bat 



PnmeL Imp. k ptif. part. 

dw«U (hrckx 

ttki rent 

tell t«M 



PrMtnt. 
tbcp 



hn»d 
Mnat 



rap. a parf, pai^ 

iptd 
hi«d 
•wacr 



baaC ffat S«t 

9Smm learner akioold be tau^t to spell both the radicals and da^ 
rivaftivas. 



Fwlaat Inp. h pirf. part, 
tit Mt 



apca4 
Mva 

|ild 
cM 
•pill 
httOA 



im4 



(iltr 
girtr 
•pOt 
buiU 

iMt 

daaH 



4m. 

hit 



kiaJr 



kava 

frel 
ftad 
Set 

WMf 

draam 
b« 



9 
bkad 

M 

bioi 



itB|k. aptf^pfeit. 

kft 

incc 

Mt 

M 

tti 

wapt 

diaampt r 

faa caftr 

flanipC . 

ar«|»t 

Uad 

fouod 

Waiiad 



P. 

friatd 

a^ 

baf 
trand 
(or gat 
hold 



frooad 

fOflfbt 



add 



Mjr 



hid 

•aid 



•track 





AMERICAN SCHOi 


>L 


CLASS.6( 


)OK» N 


o. I. : WM 


TniMl 


toip. It pai& {art. 


Trmnu 


Iflf. It poiL fart* 


rriii>t 


Iiiip.4p«i&fart. 


1^ 


eUnt 


ba>v 


hangr 


tBiak 


theufht 


wis 


won aphi 


■poo 


briar 


Vwigkt 


*r 


'' dUff f 


atidk 


ftoefc 


taaah 


taoght 


nog 


■Mf 


tuiag 


titnag 


•aak 


•Ol^t 


«f 


llH« 


aming 


•wtaf 


aatafa 


caugkir, 


•the 


■tuaf 


WTiDf 


wnaf 


work 


wnagM 


•tUi 


■V* 


■RrutK 


nb^nfl^F 


bawaok 


baaought 


Bmm 


■L ImfuU^ 


FarCPart. | 


riimt. 


tuMrfbat. Pa^. But. 


IbtM 


ilMvad 


iha vaar 


■iak 


Mk 


•wik 


■hiV 


abaJMd 


■kapaar 




■pitef 


ipraaf 


•praqf 


gMTtt 


gnvad 


fravtar 




■wia 


awaa 


awum 


]>4» 


kdad 


kdaa 




ha MB 


bofta 


bag.. 


fnz 


wasad 


wasaar 


din ^ 


dwat 


daradv 


■ktfv 


■hovad 


■bo«rm 


fiJI ' 


M 


fiOlaa 


tow 


aowad 


aowa 




dnw 


dnw 


dnw» 


■MV 


n»ad 


matm 




raa 


ru 


niB 


ma 


•v 


m«B 


' ^ 


ianr 


«owa 


aUda 


W 


ckiddaa 




»• 


fay 


kk 


Ula 


Ut « 


bitita 




kad 


kadad 


kdMr 


lada 


hid 


W4MI 




•1»7 


akw 


•kia 


■lida 


alid 


•ltd (Ian 




UM 


•aw ad 


aawar 


ha# 


bairad 


bawn r 




Mow 


bkw 


^ bkwri 


ttte 


taok 


takaa • 




CXD# 


arawr 


anwad 


ikiM 


^ ibaok 


«liak«a 




frow 


gnw 


gitfm 


fornha 


lor took 


for Ml kim 




kaow 


kaaw 


%aow« 


Uu 


Ink* 


bona 




throw 


thraw 




bmk 


Waka 


brakaa 




an 


waa. 


baaa 


taar 


tor* 


ton 


4 


eooia 


otma 


aaana 


••rtAr 


•wora 


■won 




jin. 


gava 


givaa 


ak«f»* 


•bva \ 


abvaa 




da 


did 


dooa 


•paak 


•pek> 


ipokaa 




r<» 


want 


gooa 


kMTa 


bora 


hovaa 




alotha 


elotbad 


aM» 


itaal 


Mola 


atokn 




cbooM 


ahon 


a&o tas 


^l«a«« 


irova 


wo vaa 




driva 


drova 


driVOB 


tnum 


Ima 


fro Mi 




rtda 


nda 


liddM 


•aa 


KW 


aaan 




■triva 


ctnra 


acmoB 


•at 


ala 


aataa 




HBttia 


•OMta ^ 


aauttaa 


•haar 


■haarad 


wbon 




thnv* 


thnn 


ttoiviar 


amll 


awaUad 


awoUoa 




writa 


wrota 


•ant Cm 


inak 


dnok 


draak 




aoM 


ana* 


BIMBB 


»li« 


mg 


nor 











DBVECTITX TJBRB8. 

Defective rerbs are those which are med only i& some of their 
moods and tebses. 

90r The pKndpal of them are these. 



will 



loMtiaal* 

oaiul 

Biigki. 

aboald 

W09U 



Pwf. Part. 



PraaaBt. 

oiaat 



inpailiML 



Pbf. Put 



ought 
quoth 



r^ SYNTAX. I 

Syntax treats of the agreement, govemmept, and proper arrange- 
ment of words and sentences. - . * i 
A sentence is a nnmber^ words maldaig complete sense. • I 

■» ■ — — t ' -*l 

• WbwakvwbiiiBifiMtot^aiirHnikf. 

X 



236 • JUVENILE SPELLING-BOOK. 

A sentence is eiihee ample or compound. 

A nmpfe seotence bas but one sul^ject, a&id one finite yferb, espi 
ed or im;"i*4;d ; aS) John reads weU* 

A ci.iii{/cund sentence con»sta of two ample sentences jcuned !•- 
gether ; as, Charles reads well, but does not write well. 

Sentences are connected by coz^unctiODSy oomparative adrecb^ 
and nuative pronouns. 

' A phrcue is two or more words rig;htl7 put together,, making^ some* 
times a part of a sentence, and sometimes a w^e sentence. 

Syntax consists of concord aod g^oTemmeuL 

Ctmcord is when one word agrees with another h. Humberj casc^ 
gender, or person. 

Gwemment is when &ae word causes ano^r to be ia some pastU 
Cttlar mood, tense, or case. 

BTNTACtlCAL KE7. 

A %ur)e stands as the representative pf tlie rale of .syntax, wfatdi 
ftorems or influences the, word over which it is placed. The %ares 
1, 2, 3, 4» Ac. represent the rules, 1, 2, 3, 4, Ac. References to the 
ruJes in tKe early stages of the learner's progress in syntactical pars- 
ing, will greatly facilitate his acquaintance with the power or influ- 
ence that one word has with and over another, ia cotatruction. 

The straight line ( ,) when applied to articles and nounsr, 

shows that it points out the nouns, accordinjg; to position, either in th^ 

^nominative orol^ective case; as, a man; the men; I sawtiiesuou 
When applied to an adjective, adverb, or participle, it shews that the 
adjeetioej or adv^b belongs to, or expresses the quality, or some cir 
cumstance of the word to which it is annexed ; as, 

I — y=^/'->4— ao 

A just man acts uprightly* 
When applied to nouns which are Jcuned together by coppocUvi^. 
either coptt2a<tt;eor d^tmetioej it diows continuation of idea; ai. 

John and Charles love 8tu<]tf • 

William or Marf will obey us. 

The curve line (j^ * ) exhibits the governing inflafibce of tivi 
fttnt over the verb, and of the tranative verb over Its object : aau 

John instructs Charles. 
^ When applied to noons connected with, or influeaced by a pi«pQ- 
tition, it shows the connection, or government over the twgn ff ^ ng^ 
Bouns which follow it ;ai^ 

ThA love of God secures oar happiBMi^ Isir 



AM£KICAN SCHpOL CLASS-BOOK. NO. L 237 

"Wlieii two noans or pronoims come together si^tfying^ di&reot 
things, or possession^ the latter gorernft the fonner ; as, 

John's i)oOk; my father's bousei Ice. 

•AAar ffonr tbroagh tb* nilM of tjatut in OA muuMr, the pnptW vflT he (foaliCed to write «aM» 
•hes, which ou^ht oot to be pMwd otcf, tven wh«n eorreot, without m itrict exnminAtioii. Th«y 
Boat be required to point out er«rj imtuioe to Which the rule it exemplilied • t», under nlla 3d, 
— Which IB the- aomiMitive etM ? Wliicfa ia the Tcr^ ? Of what number are they 1 t>o th^ ft— t 
Row do Umj ap-ee ?•— The'nde mutt th«o be fiven ; and lo on thrua|<fa the variom rulee of lyntax. 
If the Juveoile Exporitor is uied, tiie eamptoa under no(M and obaervatioiM may, with propriety, 
bit omitted, ttU the aeooad or thirdl time soiRff over, beiar too diiHcult for begumen.' 

This epitoow beio^ loteoded to comprehend only tho Eaaentiats of Eaf Sah Oraaiaoar* th» anthor 
has deemed it aaoeoeasary to insert any Mat syntax. The teacher can easily make it^ by alteutf 
Words froin tiiair ^nta^lieal eorrcctncas. Tfaa ^needinf part of tbk volusa oootaiai uamarvm 
ybniM, nitabk to this pwpoMi to which tlw preceptori' may rsfar. 

/ 

Rule 1« The indefinite article a or an is joined to nouns 
of .the singular number. 

IS 13 19 

A tree. A g;arden. An orchard* 

'^ RutE 2. The definite article ike i^ used either before th^ 
singular or plural number of nouns. . 

23 23 93.' 

The man. The men. The houses. 

RutE 3. Every nominative case must have a verb express- 
ed or understood* 

S 4. , S 4 8 4 

I learn.* We read. They write. 

Rule 4. A verb mast agree with its nominative case, iu 
number and person. ' 

8 4 s 4 S 4 

Time passes, ^ Vice prevails. Mary, weeps. 

234 3 34 .33 4 

The trees grow. The rivers flow. The oceans fiMan. / 

Rule 6. Every adjective belongs to a substantive express^ 
ed or understood. 

15 3 15 3 ^153 

A kind guide. A sure friend. A sound n^nd. 

258 25 3'25S' 

The taU trees. Tiie green leaves. The ripe fruit. 

Rule 6. Active transitive vetbs govern the objective cast « 

S 4"6 12 3 4-8 12 3 4"6 >2 

I have paper. , We ha\'e pens. They have ink. 

He has poitcilis. You have slates. She has books. 

I commend her. We influence him. They convince me. 
Rule 7. Every verb, except in the infinitive mood, or the 

r ■ . ' .,,,-■—■. . . J 

* Aettva tnaiitira v«ba adnit of sauna or proanuai after than ; as, I leara afg tuk^ Tla.jilinni 



23S 



JUVENILE SPELLING-BOOK, 



participle, oug^ht to have a nominative case^ either 

ed or implied. 

- — - — 7.6 1 -12 

' Pmiish a robber. 

Kebuke a swearer. 
?-6 2 12 
Spin the top. ' 

Sow the seed. 
7-6 9 5 
Feed the hungry. '• 
Teach the ignorant. 

JVb is the sign of neg-ation. 

7-6 90 J2 7"« 20 12 

Give DO offence. Tell no faUehoocb. 

• Cherish no faction. Commit no crimes. 

Rux^E 8. >Every adjective pronoun belongs to a. noun ex- 
pressed or understood. 



7-6^ 1 12 

Detest a thief. 

Avoid a gambler. 
7"6 2 12 
' Fly the kite. 

Plongh the ground. 
7-6 3 6 
Visit the sick. 
Assist the ne^y. 

t"fr » y 12 
Reveal no lecrets. 
Use no deception^. 



7-^ 1 12 ^ 
AbhiMr a liar. 

Despise a dronkanL 
7-6 2 12 
R/n11 the ball. 
Full the Oax. 

7-6 3 6 . 

Clothe the naked. 
Respect the aged. 



8 7-^ 5 
Few are happy. 
Some are depraved. 

One is vicious, 
a 7-^ 12 
Some love play. 
All ask favours. 

3 4 6 

I am sincere. 

Thou art attentivt. 

34 
Jane is admired. 
Thou art tai^ht. 



8 7-4 6 

Many are miserable. 
Such are ^nful. 
Anmher is virtuous. 

8 7-6 13 

Others prefer study. 
Few serve God. 

8 U 5 

. We are gratefuL 

You are obedient. 

3 4 
She is esteemed. 
We are favoured. 



Rule 9. Prepositions govern .the objective case. 



1 3 9 u 12 
A colonel of cregiment. 

A conquest of a country. 

2 3 ^ 9 2 12 
The changes oi, the moom. 
The flowers el* the fielda. 

s 4 9 1 12 
I write with a pen. 
They cipher on a slate* 



1 !» 9 1 12 
An admiral of a fleet. 

A general of an army. 

2 3 9 2 12 . 
The motiob.of the earth. 

Thejiliesof the valleys* - 

3 4 9 1 ■ 12 
We read in a book. 
H« rules with a pencil. 



Rule 10. When two noons come together, signifying differ- 
ent thills, the latter governs the former in the possessive case. 

10"3 ■ 10-3 

God's goodness. Man's happiness. - -r 

Wisdom's precepts. Virtue's reward. 

1 • 10-3 1 lO-d 

A sinner's repentance. A christian's hope. 

A ciuld'9 gratitude A parent'ftiregard 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-HOOK, NO. I. 239 

ffl"S 4 * ^ / 10-3 4 6 

^ohn^s book is new. Sarah^ love is true. 

MUtonV poems are sublime. Meb^s minds are vicious. . 

; Rule 11. When a possessive adiectrvie pronoun and noun 
come together, the latter governs tqe former. ' ' 

S ' U 10-3. - 8 >1 /10"3 

My Other's hofuse. Thy brother's farm. y 

* Tour classfOnate^s duty. His aei^1x>ur'9 kindness. 

8 11-3 4 5' : «• "ll-3 46 

Vks time is precious. His reputation is good. 

Her friends are pious. Their r.eal is sincere. 

Rule 12. A noun or prOBOun, precede^ by an active tran- 
sitive verb, an d.V:tive? participle, or iai preposition, is in the 
objective case. 

3 4"6 J2 3 4-6 ' 12 

John assists Charles. Mairtha protects Mary. 

Sham^ follows vice. -Praise excites envy. 

7-6 6 12 . ' 7-6 5 12 ^ 

Reverence pious people. A^cnd wicked actions. 

Keep good CQmpany. Shun sinful companions. 

• 7"6 12 y T-fi 12 

Ejiow thyself. Protect yourselves. 

improve yourself. Bxamiqe yourselves- 

7-6 S 6 12 15 3- 4-6 8 11-12 

Use no indecent langtiage. ' A wise man serves his Maker. 

Injure no hun^ creature. A bad child afflicts its parents. 

Rule 13. Active participjes govern the objective case. 

3 4 13 12 3 4 13 12 

I am hearing him. He is reproving me. 

Thou art reminding as. You are obliging them. 

Rule 14. A preposition pi'eceding a preset participle^ 
governs it. • • , 

14 13 12 14 13 12 

By admonishing him. For educating us. 

in preparing it. Of consulting me. 

After advising them. Without believing her. 

^Rule 15. One verb governs another that follows k, or de- 

Fends upon it, in the iimnitiv^ mood. 
4-.15 ' ' . 3 4-15 

I design to write. , • We refuse to 3rield. 

Thou dearest to excel. You try to improve. 

8 4-15 6 • 12 . 8 4'16 6 12 

1 wish to see hkn. She j^es to instruct me. 

He appeared to love us. We desire to befriend him. 

2)^ Tilt pnpotitinB to, iImuM b« onl^Ud aftar tli* twIw Ud* dkm, Ad, Itt, nftki, aqil^ i 
llMr, and wt. 
7"« 12-Ig 7-6 12-18 

Stethemwrita. ». « Hear them read* 



240 JUVSNILE SPELLING-BOOK. 

Bid him cx»n«. L«t him cooaider. 

Make her work. Letusb^eve. ■ 

Rule 16. The infinitive mood maybe goremed bjflD ad- 
jective, noun, pronoun, verb or participle. 

9 4 5-16 6 . ^ r 4 5 16 « 

I am eag^ to learn. We are anxious tolmprara. 

He is dearous t6 excel. They are wiUiof to s^.- 

9 4"« 1 1»"16 ^ 4"6 1'12-16 

I have a letter to write. We have a desire to learn* 

He has a friend to aaaist They have a task to .recite. 

7»6 13"1« ^ 13**16 

AikhimtocalU « Permit me to reveal. 

&^ Th« prcpofiilioM to^of. far* fron, Iw. m* oftm ■iid»nt«<Ml,chie<x Mon tb* yi«QBaM> 
7-6 12 1 12 7-6 13 1 12 

G ive me a pen. Lend ,ua a knife. ^ 

Send her a present. Allow them a salary. 

7-8 12 2 12 , « 7"6 12 2 12 

Tell me tive truth. Ask him the news. 

Bring me the book. Pay him Che amount. 

Rule 1 7. The infinitiye mood follows so at, and Oum^ and 
may be said to be governed by them. 

1 3 34 6 24 n 6 

An object so high a*) to be invisible. 

An army 9o numerotis a? to be mvincible. 

RtTLE 18. The verb tabe^ through all its vaHations, has 

the same case after it as beforeJt.* 

3 4-18 S ^ 3 4-1^ S 

I am he. We are they, 

Tiiou art she. You are they. 

a 4"6 12 la. 19 9 4-6 IS 18 IS 

I believe it to be him. He took it to be them. 

3 4 Id 3 9 4 18 S 

It appealed to be she. , It seems to haye been he. 

RutE 19.^ The infinitive mood, or part of a sentence* is 
sometimes put as the nominative. case to the verb 

1» 4 5 19 ^ 5 ' 

To err* is human. t To forgive is divine. . 

To live is desirable. To die.ia dread&l. 

Q:^' -Th» iqfinitiTR mooJ i'r»<|tteoCl7 ittppliM tb« place of a noun in tb« objeefiw cam. 
3 4-6 '^ 3 4-6 • 12 i 

Boys love to play^ ~ Men like to <:omraand« 

PtVLt 20. Adverbs require an appropriate situation in a 

sentence, and should b^ placed near the Words to which 
they relarte. 



* The vmrb, to bt, reqnirM a Booiiaitiv* ob« afUr it, trrintiMi w tlw iufiwhiw m»A. wT—ITtii 
tin MMM CMC after it M bvfcf* it. - -» -f 



t An adjeotivc nay nliita to u ioMtiw mo»i 9* lit i 



AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-bOOi^ NO. I. 241 

9 3 ' 4 so 3 3 4 90 

The scholars I'e&d'weU.'' The gu48.wrtt:e correctly. 

The lightoixiff darts rapidly. The thunder roai^s aloud. 

S4« '34 30 

H0 studies attentively. She reasons profoundly. 

You act consistently. He worked diligently. 

Rule 21. Tvroor more nouns or pronoijlQ^ in the sin^laif 
number, connected by one or more copulative coiyunctions^ 
reauire a plural verb. • 

8^ Copulstiv* «onjuiieUom »n wed to join woHi utd wnteMM. , , '■ ^i 

.9 31. 3 4-18 3 3 9 n 

Meekness and modesty ^|^the ornaments of youtll. 
Regret and shame are thSTSittendants of vice. 

3 21 3 4-6 3 5 

Poverty and shame await the slothful. ' ' 

Honour and renown attend the brave. '^ 

RirL£ 22. Two or more nouns or pronouns, in.tlie sinpilar 
nnrober, connected by one or tnore disjunctive conjunctiops* 
require a singular verb. 

fi^" OnjancUra eoDJiitiolisap join wprds.or woteaoaai bot <lM)*ii» tha •enw. - 
S9i349]3 3 -:a3 49l9 

He or she is in fault. Henry or Lucy is at «c1si^j1. 

John or William is at work. Jane or C^U^. was at church. 

RviiG 23. The conjunctions cmdy or^ nor, &lc. connect 
verbs in the same moods and tenses, and uoun$ and |^ro- 
nouns in the same cases. 

3 4 33 4 3 4 23 4 , * 

He sings and plays. They react and spell. 

Roses bloom and decay. Fame dar/t^s and destroy?. 

9 4-i 13 .23 13 3 4"!f' ja 33 13 

I taught him and her. We reyt arded you and her. 

She consoled you and me.. They saw John and Pelc^r. 

9^r Whan aofulKr prononni, or a Aoan aad proBona of diiforent pcnou*, fv* dvyoMtm^ Ml^ 
— «t aJ , tin TtiV mutt qr"* *i^ f^t |«noo which it plaesd D«fareit t^ it. • .* 

9239 49 12. ^23349 13 

I or tH^u art at home. Thou or I am i)i fault. ' 

George or I am in haste. She 9r I am offended by it. , 

23 3 as 3 4-6 13 

Neither he nor she will oblige me. 
• Either vou or I can assiit them. ^ 

i^T'Or foQewa tkiUtvAnil eiHur 'm » tmtiHU^Mi Mr fottowi ttot and ncttW. 

JvvLB ^4. Conjunctions are often used distributivelv, or ill 
pairs» to connect the subsequent and preceding memoeraof 
a sentence. 

^34 9.2^9 4. 

Both— '*-'-^— and : Both you and I must die. 

' 31 3 4-6 13 24 3 4'-e 10 

ThoU{^ ——jet : Tbo^ he day me yet will I kfv v iM% 



242 JUVENILE SFELLINO-BOOKt 

94 S 4 •« 94 S 4-6 

A s " ■■■> : • As you study, so you wiUimproTe. 

3 4 90 94 53434 

So— .— — — '^•aa : Tou are not so diligeut as I am. 

9 11"3 4 34 5 94 3 . 90 4-ft 

So— ■*'■! " "that : ^My IpaJSe is so dull, that it fvill not cut. 

S 4 90. £ 94 3 4 5 • 

Hot ottly*— but » WilHam is not only good, but he is rich. 

... , 8 494 5 94 •$ Il-S 

As— ■■■■■■■ — *«»as : She is as amiable as her sister, 

RtTLE S5. The conjunctions than and as used incomp^ri- 
'iOD, require tke same case after, as before them. 

,3.4 90 25-23 J- 4 

'I can read better than he. (can read) 
He will go-quicker than she. 

9 4-6 12 20 2523 12 

I respect him more than yon. 

They rtgard them more than mc. , . 

^1^ OmjmdlU^ ihtt km or * poath« uti febaolate Mtai«^ itkijoirt flM.Mio»tif» flw«i. 
S 4 5 93 3 4 ' 6 

Wmiam is healthy, because he is t^perato. 
He i«'discree<^ though he is young. 

35 8 4 25 3 4 

As virtue advances, so vice recedes. 

As science is encouraged, so sodety improves. 

I^vta 26. The conjunciwus^^though^unhtSyexc^t, VfUt^i' 
«f , &c. generally seqitire the subjunctive Boood after them 

95, 3 ' ' 5 r-e 12 

If James shbiAi' ho oi?< obedient, punish him. 
Though he sboulJ. be obstinate, confine him. 

.aS»24 .3 4 ■(> 19 94 3 4-6 . 13 • 

Though dharU " n»v;lprt me, yet I respect him. 
Although he pui: ' .a us, yet. we esteem him. 

RtLtt 27. Lest and thai aniie^ed to a eommand, precedix^^ 
necessarily require the subjuQctive: mood. 

7 5 iP 8 4^ 2 . J2 ^ 

' Bi^ cautious that you speak the truth. 

1'-% aO 19 27 3 4 » 12 

ijove not sle^p, lest thou come to poverty. 
If eglect not frugality, lest yo.u come to want* ^ 

Pursue not pleasure, lest you go to destmctioa. 
RtiLK 28. The present participle preceded by ihe and fol- 
lo#eabyo/!is.anoiin. . ■ . . t 

. y ,28-3 9 8 ,n«19 4-18 9 3 9 19 

The loving of our enemies is the ootqmand of God. 

Th» fni ^fhoqld bath bp <ned,.cr Mb be omitted, 

"■ ^'" . ' — *— • '" ■ ■ ■ -1 m< III 

« .- .. . ." ■ ■' ■ 1 

I ' , ' 



AlinCRICAI^ SCHOOJL CLASS-BOOK, NO. f. 243 

RvLE 29. A- noun or pronoun put in apposition* with 
asiother. must be in the same case. - 

29-3 2 29-3 4 9 11 

Paul the Apostle, "was beheaded by Nero,. 

Christ the Saviour, Was crucified on Calvary. * 

Rule 30. Eveiy noun when addressed, becomes the ife- 
cond person, and is in the nominative case absolute. 

30 7"6 .8 U* 12 30 20 4 ll") 

Parents, instruct yottr children. O grave, where ia..thy victory i . 
Children, obey your patents. O death, where is thy sting I 

Rule 31. A noun of multitude, or conveying unify of 
idea, must have a singular vedh; but if the noun coihrey plu- 
rality of idea, it must have a mural verb. 

3 31-3 4 S 2 .31'3 4 6 

The meeting was large. The nation is powerful. 

The people are religious. The multitude were noisy. 

^ Rule 32. The distributive adjective pronouns, eoc^, evhrf/^* 
either, agree with the nouns, pronouns and verbs, of the sin- 
eular number only. t ^ ■ : '" 

32 9 2 13 7-6 8 11-12 

Eadi of the •cbolars has read his leason. 

32 ^3 . 4 

Every virtue will be rewarded. 
Every idler ought to be punished. , 

83 3 93 3 4 . 3» 4 

Either Charles or Mary will come and obey, 
nther she or he baa read and written. 

P^ Til* d«BOHtnttT« M^tctm pnooanliUfAad Omt, with flwlr (lanJi Am tai IAm^ pHl 
■gfwiwitb thdr aoUtaiitiTtt ia Bombar. *- 

37163 8715 S 

This 18 a good bey. That is a bad youth. 

8 3 4 6 8 3 4 5 

This bey 18 playful. . Thestf boys are studious* " 

That man is negligent. Those men are carefol. 

^Cr TlUtmMM ud thai trntm nmt %• mad wbta dwj rtfcr to «rlHit it mfiifar; aai |||pi 
•MOT* or iMom w w * whca tbay nhu to wtet '» phitaL y 

3 4 3D . 93 9 8 11"1S 7 5 

John studied closely, smdby this means became leaned. 
He worked diligently, and by that meana grew rich. 
Rule 33. When thisi or its plural these ^ is contrasted wilh 
duU or itrphiral those^ this or these refers tt> the latter, thai or 
those to the former word, clause, or sentence. 

3 4 5 9 13 

Cheerfiiliw is preferable to mirth ^ 



* A word addvd to aootfaar by wtif •( •wfiumtioo, tad muniny Hm mim jUnf , ii nlA to bt to 

iwei to ii» 

tUBlm tht plural noon ooavvf a flQlkciiTC Mm; M, * Mtiy ais bmbUm,* 'iTirj buiijiij jmi, 

f !*»?< Md bil,/0rm«r ud lB/<«r, fiM Md «fA«r, cont^oftd io tte MUM UAMr. 



244 iwnyvLf: spelling-book- 

^ ^ ♦ 1 si »-«S 1 * 

This nay U ooDsidered an aet ; that a habit. 
RiTLB 34, Pronouns and pronominal adjectives must cor- 
•Mpond m person, number and gender with tbe nouna which 
my represent 

8 4 9 n 94 9-e 9 5 12 

Jane Mgmnf td Enn^e; she ip in bad healUi. 
Thecriore went to Canada : he was in h^h sptrito. 
Rule 35. When no nomina live comes between, the relative 
iAd the vterb, ttie relative is the nominative case to the verb. 

^ S5 4 & 4 s 

She who is V]rtiibi% W0I be happy. 

m» They who are idle, are discontented- 

nVLt 36. When a nominative comes between the relative 
tnU tbe verb, the relative is governed by the verb following, 
«r by a preposition preceding it. 

The friend whom I have chosen, is faithful. 
The Being whom I serve, is eternal. 

The Creator in whom we truift, is onmipoteat. 

_ , ^ {ttr#F»or«l»tettop«noM. ■', 

'598 35"3 4S 12 

^ Se gratefal to those who teach you. 

9^ fF%Mlb ntotM to toiflialL and inyn tT UfVf tU«n. . 
9 3 46 8 ♦•a, 4 5 

Tje anunal which we pursued, was sagacioot* 
The birds which we have taken, are beautifiU. 

- ^i^T'AoliiqfltotilBaManfaaiTtforwhotacrwbiBh. 
^ • » 4 6 4 

Men that are honest will be rewarded. 
Habits that, are vicious should be avoided. 

|gp WMb & ral(iti«» ■ in Um fomm^ oMe, it ii roi«md by th* nbitiMiM ftlnmct* 
_«• 71 S 8 ll-S 4 5 — '— »* 

' 5?^ ** * ^'^^^^*"^® "^bosf* feUowers are immoraL 
This is a religou whose origin is divine. . 

S 4-e 8 r:2 35-3 4 5 , 

I love such persons as are good. 

We may trust such men as are honest 

flucE 57. The answer must be in the same case as the ih« 
terrpgatcny. 

^9 U"9 4 8 $7 85 4-8 3 12 SI 

mose boAis.tlns ? Mine. Who took the hate ? She. 

Whose house is that? Henj. Wo kept the accounts ? He* . 

^RuLB 38. When a noun or pronoun is put absolutely, and 

t^Tth^''J^'^^^^ ^5".^^'*VF ^^^^' it remains inifepen^ 
dent on the participte, and is caifed the nominative absdute 



AMEBiciN SCHOOL class-boob; Ka L ^(k^ 

98 3 4 9 SI 13 

She faavins sirrired, ire retired to the countiy, 
HebeinffaianH^ed, ^ey returned t4^ the villaM, ^ > 

31 ' 3 4-4 8 11-19 ; 

Bdng^oooTiiicei, 1 confers my erronr. 

g^ A pxrtk^ hfctiey iL uHbm of > wbtttiitif» fwrw <» f oil M<i t»it» n4iyi<W 

Ml |ft« BoiBinitiv* «KM to a fo^wi«f T«rl». 

8 11-3 6j 4-6 9 }» 

His being pre^t, prevented the accident* 

O^^ A partkipit ii laiuftiiti B»td indtpwdwtly, ia flonMatioa with ■» aiwiK 
5 , 90 4 

.Falsehood, geferally speaking, is detested. 
Rule 39. Parti<iipial nouns are oft^n usj^d without aoTdlU 
iective case following them. 

* ^ 4 '9 8 Jl-39 

I knewbf his failing. 
KuLB 40. Partidples ofien stand without a noun on wbttti 
they immediately depend, being referable to either of the 
persons indlfinitelj. 

3 ao 4 90 40-13 8 H-12 

John coiAd not act otherwise, considering hit statioD, 

Rule 41» Active participles, connected with a noun lfld|p 

pendent, gpvem an objective ca^e after them. 

2 ■ 41 •• 10 2 12 3 4-16 10 5 

The sifi's dispersing the clouds, it began to grow warm. 
Rule 4t. Intransitive verbs are followed by the nilllt 4l 
Ihe act, vdbich the verb expresses in action. 

if 3 42 9 2 5 

TojUe the death of the righteous. . 
Rule 43. Passive verbs which smkifymmmgfkt mMf 
bave the same case before and after them 

S 43 3 S 4« 12 

liMner is stiled the prince of poets. « 

Alexaoder is acknowledged the emperour of RiMda^ 

Rule 44. Some vert)s appear to govern two words in tl^ 
bjective case. 

8 4"44 13 13 • It I|'13-10 

Did I request theei Maker from my day* 

« 13 12* 

To mould me man. 

Ru&E 46. Nouns of nufflber, we^ht and measure* staoi 
witlioat a governing word. ^ 

ir5«633S4lS 

A wall seven (Mthig^ and two feet Uttdc V 

1 3 6 4& 5 4"6 IS 

An anny five thousand strong invaded Canada* 

RirtB46.Theparlicl^ 03 when used by itielfiif«n»ial|| 
I coiQunctioiv 



t 

I 



2^6 



/UVENILE SPELLING-BMS. 



T* « , 1112 46 13 

Lore thy neighbour as thyselC " • 

r-6 (9)13 a 1113 46 3 4"t t U'lS 

Forgive us our debts as we forgive our debtora. 
RuLG 47. A noun or pronouq following the copjunctioo btU 
or ^n, and having the same construc^on as the noun 01 
pronoun preceding it, is in the same casoi 

8 4-t> 12 47 12 . 

I saw nobody but him. 

3 47 3 4 5 
Nobody but Charles wns present. 

R&LE 48. An interjection must be followed by the ob 

jective case of a pronoun in the fiAt person ; and by a nom- 

uative of tjbie second person. 

48 13 48 13 48^ 3 

Ohme! Ah me! 6 thou! 



PAUSES IN READING. 

Tb* kanwr ihould itop 
.AlllM«o«dit,(;;)ta)iMMaeoaQt om; | At ibt ooka, (:> till • • — •, 

At liM MiaieobD, ({) till - - - > two ; | At. the ftrioi^ (.) til > - bar. 
"^ (!) A aol* of iotarrogiition, ^ifiwi' — Thii iMrk » alwaj/pbced after a qnettiM. (!) A 
tt adininilie*^ U ~ued After any tbinf «voiid*rfaI or Mrprisiof ; and ia good proaupoiitiMk raqaIrM 
|MW KtiMtHbat longer Ifcaa tba period. ' (a) A earct (itMd oaly in (rritiag) deMtaa tbat a ktlir c | 

irord ia left out bjr mutafce ; a<« A« i» a a tehc/tar. — {-) A byphea to need to wpai^te «ynablc8, aaiil 
fte menbera at eovspound worda ; u, t»^k, •mmteh-mtti. — (') Ao apealrop^ <}'<"*«• tbe poMcanva 
; u, /aliii'* bopk ; or •b^wi that a letter or •ylUble is emitted : uMtftat'i krje«ni, 
V *) (** **) -^ quotation, or iiiigle.ur doable coiiuaa tnnwd, thowa that a pttng* ■ tahaa froEJ 
other aatfaor in fail Own werda. ^n^ Ao index pointa out a puMtg* m ramarknUa. (§) 4 
•cbtioD or dlvMoR, ia oaed to «ribdivi(Se obaptera. (IT) A parigraph ia oied ehwflj ia 1i» BiUe, ao^ 
Jenotea tbr hegiboiog of a new aubjcat. [ > Braddrta inclnde a word/or aaalraee, iutaided to es-i 
plain aometbiiti: tbat (irccedea of^folioWa. (*) Adtasteriak or atar, and theae narka (f ^ |() are all 
■aad to refjy to aome note ia tbe rnf/gin, or at the fool of the paga. Q An aeoeat pointa out thi 
qrUftbh oa wtaish Uw foiM of tfaa f0ioe ia to be placed c aa inbal'aaoe, dtf Ijy, aouyly', te. 



NUMERICAL TABLE;^ 



'JnMt, 


' 


Romaru 


Jnbbt, 




JM'IIUUU 


' Atmbit, 




Jfen«» 


Oae 


1 


I. 


SiKteen 


16 


xvi. 


8eT«nfy..fiva 


"» 


LXXT 


Two 


3. 


II. 


Sevetitaea 


17 


XVII. 


E^h^ 


80 


LXXX 


Threa 


3 


W: 


Eighteen 


13 


XVII I. 


Eighty4ra 


85 I.XXX^ 


Ffiur 


4 


Vineteca 


19 


XIX. 


Siaitf 


90 


xc 


.£!»• 


5 


V. 


Twenty 


'90 


XX. 


One handrcd 


IQfr 


c 


As 


6 


'' VI. 


Twetity-fiva 


35 


XXV. 


Two hondrni 


3B0 


C( 


•eraa 


1 


VII. 


Thirty 


30 


XXX 


Three hoadrad 


300 


ccc 


Sight 


8 


Fill. 


Thirty-«T« 


35 


XXXV. 


Four hundred 


400 


cccc 


Iviaa 


9 


IX. 


Forty 


40 


XL. 


Five hundred 


500 


D 


Tea 


10 


X. 


Forty-ire ^ 


45 


XLV. 


Sichundiad 


003 


DC 


JBlens 


11 


3U. 


SO 


L. 


Seven haodrvd 


TOO 


Dec 




12 


xn. 


SIrty ^ 


AS 


LV. 


E%hthaiMbcd 


800 


DCCC. 


TUrteu 


13 


XIII. 


€0 


LX. 


Nioehandiad 


900 


DCCCC 


Fovrteea 


% 


XIV. 


aiaty-firo 


6& 


LXV. 


Oa> thunni 


lOfiO. 


N. 


V^ftMl 


BtvaMif ^ 


n 


ULX. 









iimmom^m 






_/^ 



*-v^ 










r'- 



^ ' f-. 






->■■<.-. 









■■ ^v- ■?: ^- ■ ^" ,. \^<:-'^. V -% .^ -i^ vc-- ^^*^-' '"'V.' ':^-^"- 




-..^M^*:c^v ;^^7<.^--^ *^ xrV^^ A.^^v' ^^^^s^"'^ ^-""^ ■ ^ ■ ■ ■ 



.' , ,,\ * ./ «■ • V • 

• • 'V -J, '%_■ ^«* •